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Old November 17th, 2015, 11:22 PM   #1161
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Yes, Mantua is really gorgeous, and it's the Italian Capital of Culture 2016, so it definitely deserves a visit. I just love its historical skyline as seen from the lake:



Well, I love to consider Rome, Venice, Florence, Naples and Milan as the big five italian cities of art, but of course someone from Bologna or Palermo can see my bias here.
There are cities much more artistically dense than Milan, of course, Milan is not a "museum city", but at the end of the day Milan is fifth IMHO because of its size and its multiple historical layers: being so big and having been so many times an important city, the sum of its monuments is just enough to make it for the fifth position, at least considering the artistical/architectural heritage only. Of course, if you consider different elements, like natural settings or artistical density, then cities like Genova, Bologna or Palermo ranks higher. If you consider charme, then again Siena or Verona ranks higher.
Milan is a sum of jewels, too many and too beautiful not to make it for the top 5, but not always a postcard, not yet at least

Here you are another ranking, very complete I have to admit:

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=678

I don't always agree with the position expressed here, but it's and interesting and well done ranking anyway. For instance, Turin is sixth for me, then Bologna, then Palermo, then Genova and Verona. But the Top 10 cities are definitely these ones.
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Old November 18th, 2015, 09:39 PM   #1162
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommolo View Post
Yes, Mantua is really gorgeous, and it's the Italian Capital of Culture 2016, so it definitely deserves a visit. I just love its historical skyline as seen from the lake:



Well, I love to consider Rome, Venice, Florence, Naples and Milan as the big five italian cities of art, but of course someone from Bologna or Palermo can see my bias here.
We agree, my two candidates were Milan and Palermo. There are more scenographic cities but these two have been very important along two millennia.
Each of them with its heyday:
Islamic Palermo was the second most populated city in Europe in the tenth century after Cordoba. In Norman times it ranked first (not counting the megalopolis between two worlds that was Constantinople). A fabulous syncretism that reaches Federico II and the Sicilian school of poetry. More: Phoenician Palermo, late medieval (with Chiaramonte and Catalan Gothic), Mannerist churches, Baroque, the liberty of Florio...
Or the late medieval, the Quattrocento and Cinquecento splendor of Milan, the city of Leonardo and Bramante and best manufactures of Europe (the Leoni family, Filippo Negroli weapons, glass work ....), also: the Roman imperial capital with early Christian basilicas, Romanesque, Baroque, neoclassicism, the liberty ....
These two cities have heritage significance along various times.
Perhaps Bologna hadn't in the past the political or population importance of these two, but is full of monuments from different periods and with Western cultural lighthouse that was university.
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Old November 18th, 2015, 10:30 PM   #1163
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I love Bologna, I'm a northen man, you know, I'm not immune to the charm of red bricks and romanesque old-style Holy Roman Empire buildings!
Bologna risked at one stage to be the seat of the Pope, when the papacy returned from Avignon, Bologna was so rich as a city that was seen as a likely capital city of the cristiandom. They planned to build the biggest church of all Europe, the San Petronio basilica. Now, unfinished with no transept and no apse, is still one of the biggest churches in the world. The papacy then decided to move back to Rome instead of Bologna because violent riots broke out against this idea.
Beside its architecture, it has some great museums and great cultural institution, like the University, as wisely you pointed out.
Both Palermo and Bologna are great!
They both lacks of somewhat mind blowing like the Duomo, a masterpiece-pop icon like the "Last Supper" or a museum like Brera to reach the fifth position, but they are both very, very close!
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Old November 19th, 2015, 04:01 AM   #1164
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This is a small mannerist jewel in central Milan built in 1561 by the architect Galeazzo Alessi for the Barnabite religious order. It's called Santi Paolo e Barnaba, but it's commonly known as San Barnaba. It's very close to the very heart of the city centre, since it's located between the Justice Hall and the Central Hospital of Milan, very close to some 60 years ago flew the Navigli channels around the historical city centre.
In 1625, the early baroque painter decorated the vaul of the choir and the apse.
The interior of the main nave is a delicious knitwork of mannerist stuccoes that may remember us the Raphael's works on the hall of Cardinal Bibbiena in the Raphael Loggias in the Vatican. Pure deliciousness, a joy for the eyes!



Stunning - exquisite. Yes, it is a jewel.
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Old November 19th, 2015, 04:06 AM   #1165
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San Bernardino alle Monache church, we met this church in the post 1143, a couple of post above, and I promised you some better pictures as soon as I could go back inside there with a decent camera. Here you are the result!




All pictures are mine.
This is so beautiful and moving. I could visit this church every day and never get tired of it
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Old November 19th, 2015, 04:11 AM   #1166
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommolo View Post
Santa Maria alla Porta church, early baroque architecture by the master of lombard baroque architecture, Francesco Maria Richino:
Detail of the beautiful baroque sculptures:




All the pictures are mine.
Thank you so much for these excellent photos - these are two of my favorites of all the pictures in your thread.

I will not include all of the photos because of space. I chose these two because they are perfect.
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“The meaning of earthly existence lies not, as we have grown used to thinking, in prospering but in the development of the soul.”
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

"We are more closely connected to the invisible than to the visible"

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Old November 19th, 2015, 04:17 AM   #1167
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommolo View Post
San Gaudenzio basilica in Novara part III, the side chapels:

The magnificent polyptich of Gaudenzio Ferrari, the artistical masterpiece of the basilica, we'll see it in more detail later:





All pictures are mine.
A masterpiece indeed. Bravo
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“The meaning of earthly existence lies not, as we have grown used to thinking, in prospering but in the development of the soul.”
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"We are more closely connected to the invisible than to the visible"

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Old November 23rd, 2015, 02:09 PM   #1168
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Thank you my friend TimothyR for your very kind comments!
I'm trying to focus more on the artworks of the temples from now on, to show the little and ofter overlooked jewels that you can see there.
As we say in italian, "ogni chiesa è una piccola pinacoteca", "every church is a little art gallery"
Thanks again for your very welcome contributions and opinions, stay tuned for more post soon!
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Old November 23rd, 2015, 04:10 PM   #1169
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great view
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Old November 25th, 2015, 01:15 AM   #1170
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thank you very much!

San Lorenzo basilica in Mortara, called the "duomo", some 40 kilometers south west of the Duomo cathedral of Milan.
It is an interesting example of lombard brick gothic style, built between 13750 and 1380 by the architect Bernardino da Novara.

The Facade, quintessentially lombard brick gothic (from Wikimedia Commons):



The interiors, measuring 50 meters long and 20 meters wide, quite big for a relatively small city as Mortara (population: 15'000)





The main altar:



The full sight of the basilica at the main entrance:











The pulprit:



Renaissance painting by Gerolamo Giovenone (1490-1555), "Madonna with a Child with the Saint Roch and Saint Sebastian":



Side chapel with the the masterpiece "Madonna of the Rosary" by Bernardino Lanino, painted in the year 1579:





(this last one from Wikimedia Commons)



All the pictures without credit are mine.
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Old November 25th, 2015, 01:38 AM   #1171
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A little and delicious modern church I had the chance of visiting while today's "golden hour" (that is 4:45 pm these days haha!)
This is called the "church of glass", the Nostra Signora della Misericordia church in Baranzate, in the outskirts of Milan, very close to the former Expo 2015 area.
It's one of my favourite modern churches. So whimsical, so delicate. So beautiful.

Quote:
Architects: Mangiarotti e Morassutti, year 1958.







Golden hour:











Riflessi di luce nell'acquasantiera:











The exterior, a small jewel case full of light:

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Old November 25th, 2015, 01:56 AM   #1172
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Santa Maria di Piazza in Busto Arsizio, some 35 kilometers northwest of the Duomo cathedral of Milan. Built between 1515 and 1522 in perfect Renaissance style, this is one of the most important dome-central plan building in Lombardy. The architect is arguably Antonio da Lonate.





The (very dark, I know, sorry!) interiors:



The artistical masterpiece of this small and perfectly designed church is the "Polyptich of the Assunta", by the great Gaudenzio Ferrari, one of the biggest names in the Lombard Renaissance. This polyptich has been painted between 1539 and 1540. It has 500 years on its back!





From the website of the basilica:



The most important church in Busto Arsizio is the basilica of San Giovanni, built between the XIII century and completed in the year 1634 in baroque style:





The (dark again) interiors:





The moment when you realizes that your camera has a flash







The dome of the basilica of San Giovanni battista in a picture taken from Wikimedia Commons:



Other pictures of the interiors of the basilica from Wikimedia Commons:







All pictures without credit are mine.
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Old November 25th, 2015, 02:04 AM   #1173
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San Magno basilica in Legnano, some 30 kilometers northwest of the Duomo cathedral of Milan, very close to Busto Arsizio.
This is a delicious example of the Bramantesque architectonical school of the Renaissance. Donato Bramante, one of the most important architect and artist of the High Renaissance, worked for years in and around Milan, and he had lots of fellow architects that learned from him his style. This is the result: the basilica of San Magno in Legnano has been built between the years 1503 and 1514 as a beautiful domed central-plan building.







The most important piece of art of the basilica, and one of the most moving painting I've ever seen is the "Madonna with the child and saints and angels", painted in the year 1523 by Bernardino Luini, a Leonardo da Vinci follower. It's astonishing as a painting! Really divine!









The apse frescoes around the polyptich of Bernardino Luini have been painted by Bernardino Lanino between the years 1562 and 1564:





The (again) very dark interiors:



High definition picture of the "Madonna with a child" polyptich by Bernardino Luini from Wikimedia Commons:



All the pictures but the last one are mine.
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Old November 25th, 2015, 07:51 PM   #1174
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San Luigi Gonzaga church, one of the biggest revivalist churches in Milan.
It was built between 1892 and 1896 by design of the clergyman Locatelli and the engineer Casati. The bell tower, standing 50 metres tall, has been built in the year 1903, while the facade, inspired by the neoclassical architecture, han been built between the years 1906 and 1908.
The church has a typical basilical plan, with no transept and a wide, tall central nave with two side aisles.

The facade, picture from Urbanfile Milano ( http://blog.urbanfile.org/category/milano/ )



The interiors:

The interiors:



















All pictures but the first (credited to Urbanfile) are mine.
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Old November 25th, 2015, 08:58 PM   #1175
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The Madonna delle Grazie sanctuary all'Ortica, in the peripherical district of the Ortica, eastern Milan. The little church is also called Santi Faustino e Giovita sanctuary.
The first church is from the year 1182, then church was re-consecrated after presumably a rebuilding in the year 1370 and what we see today is the building that was "modernized" in the year 1519.

The birth of this church was followed by the destruction of Milan by Frederick Barbarossa, when the population of Milan moved into the external borough in order to escape the violence, this church also contains a scratching (or synopia) of the year 1182 dedicated to the Madonna delle Grazie to ask her to intercede and help stopping the violence. The year later, 1183, after the Peace of Costance, the synopia or scratching on the wall was completed with a beautiful fresco, still present nowadays.

The exteriors of this church show no particularly interesting features or decorations:



(picture from Wikimedia Commons)

The interiors are quite a surprise, with an explosion of colors and decorations:







The main apse:



The counterfacade:



The beautiful frescoes that decorate the vault:







The 1183 fresco made to thank the Madonna delle Grazie (Our Lady of Graces) for the Peace of Constance:



Details of the decorations of the vault:







Geometrical decorations on the vault of a side chapel:



Traces of frescoes of Leonardesque painters, artworks made after the 1519 restoration of the church:



look at these leonardesque faces:



Others leonardesque frescoes:



All the pictures (except the first one, credited to Wikimedia Commons) are to be credited to www.milanofotografo.it
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Old November 26th, 2015, 02:24 AM   #1176
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Santissimo Redentore church, in the Porta Venezia district of central Milan. This church is one of the most faithful example of philological neoromanesque church in Milan,
it has been built between the years 1898 and 1900 by the architect Luigi Macchi.

The facade, from Wikimedia Commons:



The main nave in a picture from Wikimedia Commons:



The interiors in HD pictures: (please scroll the picture ---------------------------->> )



The main altar:



The mosaics of the apse, representing Christ the Pantocrator, a typical romanesque subject for the apse of churches:





Details of the decoration of the apse, very neoromanesque:



A side chapel:



And the beautiful statue of the Christ the Redeemer on the altar, to whom the church is dedicated.
This statue is clearly modelled after the famous "Cristo Portacroce" by Michelangelo Buonarroti, the greatest sculptor and artist tourt court IMHO of Western World. The original statue of Michelangelo is now at the Santa Maria sopra Minerva basilica in Rome.



Except the first two pictures, all the other pictures comes from the website www.melloncelli.it

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Update: I add some more pictures of this beautiful church that I found on my archive.







the beautiful fresco of the apse:



Detail of the statue on the main altar:



The counterfacade:



A beautiful side chapel:



Detail of the decorations of this side chapel:

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Old November 27th, 2015, 04:13 AM   #1177
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Santa Valeria sanctuary in Seregno, some 36 kilometers north of the Duomo cathedral of Milan, one of the most interesting and daring neogothic church building of all the milanese area.
This big church (some 1'000 square meters big!) was built between the years 1922 and 1930 by the genial architect Spirito Maria Chiappetta, a very fascinating figure often overlooked.
I've always loved his creations!
This church has also one of the tallest bell towers in Italy, built later in the year 1965, some 81 meters tall!
It was consecrated in the year 1930 by the archbishop of Milan, the famous Ildefonso Schuster.


The main facade (from Wikimedia commons):



Another picture of the main facade:



The beautiful neogothic interiors:





The stained steel glasses:













The exteriors, the side:





The tall bell tower:



The apse:





And again, here you can actually appreciate the very tall bell tower:



All the previous photos are mine, now some more picture from the official webpage of Santa Valeria sanctuary in Seregno (www.parrocchiasantavaleria.it):



[IMG][/IMG]

The counterfacade in panoramical picture:





The statues decorating each pillar:





The counterfacade:











The altar of the transept:



The main altar:

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Old December 7th, 2015, 05:14 PM   #1178
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Happy Sant'Ambroeus everyone! As you may already know, December 7th is the patronal feast of Milan, whose patron saint is St.Ambrose. To celebrate this feast, here you are some imagesof the beautiful light effects that you may appreciate this time of the year inside the basilica of Saint Ambrose, the archetypical building of the so-called "Lombard romanesque", or "First Romanesque". This style later on the Middle Ages traveled throughout Europe, creating the first pan-european style.



The golden altar of Vuolvinius, one of the biggest masterpieces of Carolingian goldsmith, an absolute masterpiece I could spend hours and hours and hours staring at in awe, really!



The light gets dimmer and dimmer each span, a play with light. It's not the apse that captures your attention, but it's the main entrance instead. Here it enters the light, with the people, with the community. Saint Ambrose was a archbishop and a "civil servant", a public administrator. Outside, before the facade, there is a portico that has the same exact dimensions of the basilica: the public area is as important as the cultual interior area is. This basilica is a treaty of philosophy an theology, really.



























And the beautifully classical romanesque facade:



Happy Sant'Ambrogio everyone! Time to decorate the Christmas tree!
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Old December 17th, 2015, 04:16 AM   #1179
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A little, unknown jewel from the outskirts of Milan, in the city of Melzo, 19 kms east of the Duomo cathedral of Milan.
Here you can see the very small church of Sant'Andrea, which has some surprise on the inside, even if the exterior may be somewhat dull and only the use of the bricks connotate this building as an actually ancient building.



When you enter the door, you see a very simple medieval structure, with an apse still in gothic style with some interesting frescoes:



The frescoes (sorry for the bad quality of the images) have been painted in a Leonardesque style, and some scholar in the past even hypotized the direct hand of the Master.



Later on, the scholars seemed to have identified the author of these most delicate renaissance frescoes: they're from one of the most important leonardesque autor of the so-called second generation, Nicola da Caravaggio, better known as the Moietta.
We have already found the Moietta in the past, because he's the Leonardesque author of the beautiful leonardesque frescoes of the Annunciata church in Abbiategrasso, my hometown. He also painted a very interesting fresco in his hometown too, Caravaggio, in the church of San Bernardino. I hope to see these three cities around Milan (Melzo, Abbiategrasso and Caravaggio) to promote their heritage and the mastepieces painted by the Moietta, one of the best second-generation Leonardesque painter of Lombardy.

Now Sant'Andrea in Melzo offers guided tours to schools and tourists to let them enjoy the beautiful renaissance fresco:



On the left, in the apse, an interesting fresco of Sant'Andrea captures the immagination of the visitors: the saint is painted (as usual) crucifixed with an "X" cross. But the proportions are very similar to the one shown in the famous "Vitruvian man" by Leonardo da Vinci, now in Venice.



Comparation:



Detail of the beautiful Leonardesque fresco on the apse of the church, by the Moietta:



Look at the beautiful and sweet face of the enthroned Madonna...wow! It reminds me of Leonardo, of Cesare da Sesto, of Bernardino Luini and so on!

More pictures with higher definition:







Details of the famous fresco of St. Andrew crucifixed with the "X" cross with strong leonardesque influence:



These last 4 pictures with higher details have been taken from the JuzaPhoto's profile of the user Valerio74
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Old January 3rd, 2016, 04:24 PM   #1180
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The Oratorio of Santo Stefano chapel in Lentate sul Seveso, even if quite typical and not so spectacularly decorated on the outside, have some amazing medieval frescoes on the inside, built in the year 1369. The gothic frescoes have been made by Giottesque artist, like the famous Anovelo da Imbonate, whose Crucifixion is probably the masterpiece of this little jewel just oustide of Milan's urban area, 24 kilometers north of the Duomo cathedral of Milan. The building of this little church was decided by the Count Stefano Porro, who was a man of confidence of the brothers Gian Galeazzo and Bernabò Visconti, Lords of Milan. Stefano Porro was sent as an ambassador at the court of the emperor Charles IV of Bohemia, a land at the time very devoted to Saint Stephen.







And the interiors! Ready? BAM! Here you are!















The lower part of the Crucifixion by Anovelo da Imbonate:















The masterpiece of this little chapel, the frescoes dedicated to the Life of Saint Stephen, it is the world's most complete cycle of frescoes dedicated to Saint Stephen known.





















And last, the death of Saint Stephen:



View of the chapel of Saint Stephen in the small town of Lentate sul Seveso:



All pictures are from Wikimedia Commons.
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