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Old January 5th, 2016, 12:14 AM   #1181
franciscoc
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awesome this fantastic chapel
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Old January 5th, 2016, 04:30 AM   #1182
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Thanks Tommolo for guiding us throught the amazing architectural heritage of Milan and Lombardy. From the austere medieval churchs to the most baroque concoctions, this is definitely a place to visit once in one's lifetime!
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Old January 5th, 2016, 04:40 AM   #1183
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Thank you very much!
To you and to all readers (and lurkers ) my dearest wish for an amazing 2016,
may we all be blessed with a load of beauty and art! Art saves, I do believe in it!
(y tambien como es la Vispera, Felices Reyes Magos! )

Since you appreciated the small jewel that is the Oratorio di Santo Stefano in Lentate sul Seveso, I reply with a very similar little jewel, still very unknown, I don't know why sincerely...is such a treasure!
This little church was built in the second half of 1300 by will of the Lords of Milan, the Visconti, and shows on the inside some excellent medieval frescoes of gothic style made with a very strong Giottesque style, just like Anovelo da Imbonate did in the Oratorio Santo Stefano of Lentate sul Seveso. Here we do not know actually who the Giottesque painters are at the moment, but the frescoes depicting the history of Saint John the Baptist in 24 scenes are really a rare masterpiece of beauty! On the left side, the frescoes shows the life of Saint Louise of Toulouse, a very rare choice outside of Tuscany, and a very "european" choice.

It is called Oratorio Visconteo of Albizzate, some 41 kilometers north west of Milan. Quite dull exterior, you only see that this building is somewhat very ancient from the outside, nothing prepares you to what you will see on the interiors:



But when you go inside, what you see is really breathtaking! Whoa!













The counterfacade, frescoes are literally everywhere!











And if you want to see more about this amazing chapel, here you are a panoramical view of the frescoes inside...really a masterpiece!

http://gigapan.com/gigapans/146303
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Old February 14th, 2016, 04:37 PM   #1184
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Some pictures about the baroque interior of the gothic cathedral of Monza, north of Milan, very close to the city center:























The golden main altar:









Images published in Facebook by Massimo bertucci on the public group: "Antichi Borghi, Abbazie, Monasteri e Santuari d'Italia", which I would advice you to follow!
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Old February 16th, 2016, 01:58 AM   #1185
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Amazing updates, Tommolo!!
Monza's cathedral is major eye candy! Was the baroque ornamentation controversial?
I am currently reading a book on italian frescoes. It feels great to understand more of their historical background and motifs!
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Old February 16th, 2016, 03:25 AM   #1186
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Hi Aljuarez and thank you!
Well, in the Renaissance, Mannerism and Baroque era, they saw themselves as the highest point of art, not always overestimating themselves to be true, but that produced a wide consensus in the manipulation and modification of historical building that nowadays would never be touched. At that time, no, it was considered a "correction" of style towards a gothic (and therefore "primitive" as the baroque-era artists would say) product.
Fashon changes, and after baroque, came the late baroque with all its plethora of excess and horror vacui, and then came the neoclassicism, that opened the way to every kind of neohistoricism. Those excess, blending together multiple historical styles in one building, produced a strong, puritanist reaction, that had a huge influence in Italy, the movement of the philological restoration, removing (once again, sometimes in excess) the baroque, decadent, arrogant decoration, rediscovering the value of historical artifacts for themselves. Archaeology was born, many baroque-decorated churches were restored to the original elegant romanesque-gothic style, overall in Lombardy, where romanic is quintessential to the genius loci of our land. In many case, the restoration of romanesque building removing the baroque decoration, was seen as a sort of cultural revendication of the austere, ambrosian lombard heritage towards a roman-driven baroque.
Of course, this restoration movement loose spin after the firsts decade of XX century, and baroque was seen, as we see it today, as one of the highest movement in western art, and of course nowadays none would hipotize to touch of modify a baroque jewel.
The history of the frescoes in Italy is not only the history of art, but it's also the history of how art was seen culturally, and how was received by the generation that would come later.
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Old February 17th, 2016, 01:29 AM   #1187
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these examples of pre-romanesque goldsmith of Monza Cathedral are among the best of his time
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Old February 21st, 2016, 03:53 PM   #1188
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Thank you! Yes, they are, high medieval period has been a very creative era for applied arts and artisans in Lombardy, it has been maybe under the Carolingian rule that Milan discovered its quintessentially mitteleuropean spirit, the gateway to central Europe and the rhenan area!

And talkin' about the central european atmosphere in Milan, what's better than the Duomo? It has been built by the will of Gian Galeazzo Visconti calling german and northern european architects and engineer purposedly to be the grandest gothic building in Europe, and almost achieving, even if 5 centuries later!

Here you can enjoy a 360║ photo to see what's the Duomo cathedral like on the inside In Italy, is second only to St.Peter's in Rome (well, the Vatican) and is considered to be the second largest gothic building in the world, only after the Seville Cathedral complex (which comprises a larger structure outside the cathedral)

http://www.360visio.com/wp-content/u...put/index.html
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Old April 16th, 2016, 04:03 AM   #1189
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San Paolo Converso church, usually closed, it is open now in occasion of the Milano Design Week 2016, the biggest design fair worldwide (as you may guess, the city is extremely overcrowded right now hehe!)

The church has been built between 1549 and 1580, in a mannerist style. The facade is early baroque, designed by the great artist Giovan Battista Crespi, called "Il Cerano", in 1619.

The church is now deconsacrated and have been given to an architural firm as office/showroom, and for the Design Week the main nave is open to show some modern design furniture and installation. This church is very important from an artistical point of view, and we hope to see it restored anytime soon, because as you can see there are a lot of "white spot" that covers the frescoes (saline efflorescences) and needs to be removed.
When the church will be completely restored, it will surely be an amazing marvel, still more than it already is today!



The frescoes on the inside have been painted in mannerist style by Giulio Campi, the main exponent of the counter-reformation movement in late Renaissance Lombardy.

The interior reminds a lot the dimension and the structure of San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore:









Excellent paintings on the side chapels:















Details of the beautiful fresco decoration all around the vault, artworks by the Campi family:

















The trompe-l'oeil fresco on the vault. If you place yourself in the middle of the hall and look up, you'll all the painted architectures perfectly aligned. Amazing!























The focal point of all the vault: the Christ ascending towards the skies. Soo beautiful!



Detail fo the amazing fresco representing the Christ:



All pictures except the very first one (which have been taken from Wikimedia Commons) are mine.
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Old April 18th, 2016, 10:59 PM   #1190
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This church is really an artistic jewel, has a suggestive atmosphere, similar to the temples of southern Italy. Interesting contrast to the design objects.
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Old April 20th, 2016, 02:57 AM   #1191
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ARE saline efflorescences easily removable or will this entail major restoration work?

Also, what are the chances that this will be open to the public soon? Does the state own the churches? the Catholic church?
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Old April 20th, 2016, 03:14 AM   #1192
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Thank you my friends for your kind comment and your sincere interest!

Yes, when asked about the saline efflorecences, they said that they were not a major damage, yet not something "fast" to remove, when they'll decide to start the restoration process, we'll have to wait years to see it completely restored like what happened to San Maurizio, whose restoration works lasted some 15 years (with many stops and gos, since in that case restorations were promoted mainly by single private donors).
The owner of this (deconsecrated) church is still the Diocesis of Milan, but in this case the times have changed, and restorations would involve the owner (the church), the public sector (region and state), and hopefully also the private sector (sponsorship of the restorations, corporates, donations).
Let's hope in a fast restoration!
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Old April 21st, 2016, 12:01 AM   #1193
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The neogothic Sanctuary of Our Lady of Santa Valeria in Seregno, north of Milan (Brianza district, some 20 kms north of the Duomo cathedral of Milan), designed by the "milanese Gaudý", the architect Spririto Maria Chiappetta between 1922-1930 in a very original and "his own" late neogothic style. The bell tower (81 meters tall) has been built in 1965 in modern style, though.

The exteriors, in a pictures taken from Wikimedia Commons:

































End of part I, follows part II
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Old April 21st, 2016, 12:05 AM   #1194
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Sanctuary of Our Lady of Santa Valeria in Seregno, Part II:













































All pictures are mine.
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Old April 21st, 2016, 10:53 AM   #1195
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Peccato per il campanile un po' bruttino...
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Old April 21st, 2016, 12:06 PM   #1196
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Si, il campanile Ŕ molto moderno, peccato...per˛ Ŕ stato realizzato nel 1965, nel dopoguerra e lo stile dominante Ŕ quello, Ŕ alto 81 metri comunque, uno dei pi¨ alti d'Italia.

GiÓ che ci sei, ti volevo proporre un articolo sull'architetto della chiesa su Urbanfile, Spirito Maria Chiappetta, a parte il nome buffo, Ŕ stato per me un genio del tardo neogotico, una specie di -esagerando- Gaudý alla milanese. Il suo stile Ŕ riconoscibilissimo, ha realizzato per esempio il santuario di San Camillo de Lellis in zona centrale...
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Old April 22nd, 2016, 11:38 PM   #1197
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Abbey of Viboldone, in San Giuliano Milanese, 11,5 kms southeast of the Duomo cathedral of Milan (part 1).

It is clearly one of the most important medieval and gothic monument in all lombardy, and maybe in the whole northwestern Italy. The abbey itself has been built between the year 1176 and the year 1348. But its magnificence and importance is not related to its architecture, but the artworks that shows inside, the frescoes are amongst the best in Lombardy, and are all related to the successful workshop that Giotto, the father of all the Western painters and the very one that paved the way towards the Renaissance, created in Lombardy during his visit. The frescoes, which dates back to the year 1370 (or 1350 for some other scholar) and particularly the Universal Judgement, are attribuited to Giusto de' Menabuoi.

We're approaching the Abbey, we see first the tall bell tower in the distance, a very quiet and peaceful rural agricultural area very close to central Milan:



The facade, a very moderate typical lombardesque brick gothic, with the typical hollow windows that let the sky in the facade:





Detail of the decorations of the facade:













[IMG]httphttps://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-br9BDKVXV6w/VxpnOU2r7xI/AAAAAAAAreY/__lVJPc8SaUwS7-SF0iEKD2-XawgK23iQCL0B/w575-h766-no/DSCN0106.JPG[/IMG]











The beautiful first chapel on the right:





























The counterfacade and the main nave as seen from the chorus:









Look at these Giottesque gothic frescoes! Amazing!



The masterpiece, the "Last Judgement" and the Christ in Throne by Giusto de' Menabuoi (with the typical still romanesque almond-shaped halo around him) is a true masterpiece! On the right of Christ stands the saved ones, and on the left the damned.





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Old April 22nd, 2016, 11:52 PM   #1198
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Abbey of Viboldone, in San Giuliano Milanese (part 2):

The frescoes of the saints, the language is gothic, but they seem to foresee something of the incoming Renaissance:











That image of the Christ is amazing! So human, so true! Renaissance is definitely coming around! The artist, Giusto de' Menabuoi, have achieved one of his masterpiece in this Christ!



And now, we're entering in the most beautiful part of the abbey, the choir, filled with gothic Giottesque frescoes of excellent quality!







The fresco known as "Madonna in MaestÓ con santi", or in english "Our Lady in Majesty with saints", painted for sure in the year 1349. 667 years old!







Again, the AMAZING fresco of the Last Judgement by Giusto de' Menabuoi, at the center of the image:













Look at the colours of the incredible Last Judgement by Giusto de' Menabuoi, on the left in this picture. You can find also another Giottesque masterpiece by him in the amazing Baptistry of Padua, near Venice, in one of the best preserved medieval cycle of frescoes.



























All pictures are mine.
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Old April 23rd, 2016, 01:13 AM   #1199
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Stupenda
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Old April 23rd, 2016, 05:00 PM   #1200
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Thank you!

Now time for some archaeology, this is the recently opened crypt of the Santo Sepolcro church, a very ancient church that stands exactly above the ancient roman forum of Mediolanum, the main plaza of the roman city. The church is very centrical, very close to the Duomo cathedral of Milan, and just in the rear of the Pinacoteca Ambrosiana of Milan, where paintings by authors like Caravaggio, Raphael or Leonardo da Vinci are to be found. The church and the crypt were built in romanesque style in the year 1030 as the church of the Holy Trinity, but was renamed in the year 1100 as the church of the Santo Sepolcro (holy sepulchre) by the then archbishop of Milan Anselmus from Bovisio, in occasion of the Second Crusade. The floor of the crypt of the Santo Sepolcro church still has the roman era marble floor of the forum, very interesting. We have also plans of this church (both the upper and the lower churcher, that is the crypt) by Leonardo da Vinci, that regularly visited this interesting church during his 20-years long milanese period at the court of the Sforza. This is how the crypt looks like, very interesting!



The roman marble floor of the Forum Mediolani, the central plaza of the city:



















The main altar of the crypt:











The statue of Saint Charles Borromeo, that used to go to this church to pray when he was archbishop:













In a side chapel of the crypt, you find a small circular opening on the wall, that let you see inside a small room with an ancient roman tomb and two vases:



Ancient frescoes ruined but still visible:







And also a beautiful, better preserved renaissance frescoes:







Details:



That eyes are sooo Leonardesque, aren't they?



Symbol on the original roman paved Forum, traces of the roman carriages running through the trafficked plaza are still visible too!

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