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Old May 18th, 2016, 10:26 PM   #1221
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Yes, indeed! Sometimes we exaggerate the negative opinions about the so called "barbarian populations". Often they were violent and distruptive, of course, but sometimes they were capable of building beautiful things and artistical products of high quality.
Do not forget that the reason for which the barbarian were pressing at the outside borders of the empire was the fact that they saw the roman way of living, with their commodities and its luxury and they "wanted it too"...they did not want to destroy, they wanted live that way too! And this is demonstrated by how fast the barbarians becomes "romanized" after the fall of the borders.
They tried to adopt the religion, the culture and the art of Rome. In Milan and in all the Alpine-Rhenan area this is quite clear to be seen: with the Longobards and then the Carolingian taking over, they become more and more Byzanthine.

Rome conquered Athens, but Athens conquered Rome.
And the Barbarians took over the (western) roman empire, but the roman empire took over the barbarians culture, too.

The same, exact way.

But luckily, to return back to topic, we have some excellent example of what I'm talking about, the "romanization" of the Barbarians, the Franks, or the Longobards (after whom the Lombardia region of Milan is named). We'll see now the sites of Lombardy inscibed in the UNESCO World Heritage Site "Italia Longobardorum", inscribed in the year 2011.

The sites are the ones of Castelseprio and Torba 39 kilometers north west of the Duomo cathedral of Milan, very close to Castiglione Olona. Castelseprio was the former capital of the Frank-Longobard County of the Seprio, that lived from the VII to the XIV century between the Alps and the Duchy of Milan.

What we see now is the Monastery of Torba, that was the defensive outpost of Castelseprio. We can see still now a Longobard defensive tower with some extremely interesting frescoes that some scholar point out to be the some of very, very few frescoes ever conserved by the Longobards, maybe from the VIII century.

The monastry of Torba: the defensive original function is clear.







The ancient romanesque church built at the time Torba became a monastery (originally it was a church from the VIII century):











The former monastery and the defensive tower:



The interiors of the church:



And now let's get inside the defensive tower, when we can see the Longobards frescoes from the VIII century:





























The bizanthine influence here is out of discussions, and this demonstrate how the Longobards became "romanized" fastly, as soon as they entered Italy they converted to Christianism and become influenced by the bizanthine iconography coming from Constantinople.

All pictures are mine.

It continue with part II about the "Italia Longobardorum" UNESCO World Heritage Site of Castelseprio and the basilica of Santa Maria Foris Portas.
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Old May 18th, 2016, 11:20 PM   #1222
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The Castelseprio Archeological Park part II, part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site named "Italia Longobardorum".

The Longobards archeological park of the V-VI century:



The Valley below, the Archeological park is the "Acropolis" of Castelseprio, dominating all the sourrounding area:



The apse of the destroyed church of Saint Paul:



The remainings of the interiors of what used to be the Church of St. John the evangelist, V-VI century:



The remaining of the walls of the St. John's the evangelist church:





The remainings of the baptistry:









A description of St. John the evangelist church:



The apse of the old St. John the evangelist church:





Archeological findings:



The exteriors of St. John the vangelist church:





If you use your imagination, this is the "frontal" view of the church, with the facade right in front of you and the sides of the nave opening beside of you, culminating in a major, central round apse and two round side apse:



The UNESCO Board declaration of 2011, inscribing the site to the World Heritage Site named "Italia Longobardorum":



_______

And this is the reason why we're here: the VII century Santa Maria Foris Portas little church, containing some of the most stunning things I've ever seen: frescoes dating back to the VII century probably made by an ellenistic artist, coming maybe from Constantinople. The incredible thing is that the frescoes, despite having been painted well into the Byzantine era, still have the extraordinary and "realistic" quality like the "old school" roman classical frescoes had. The unknown master still painted like the roman painted 300 years before! It may be seen as the joining link between the Classical Art and the Byzantine art. Please, look at the incredible technique of the unknown oriental master: look at the "Sfumato"! Incredible, simply incredible! This level of technique will be retrieved only 800 years later, during the Renaissance.

This may be the last known document of classical roman art (yet with oriental-ellenistic influences) during the early Middle Ages! This is the proof that there is a strong countinuity, as we said before!

Let's go and see the Santa Maria Foris Portas church (in English: St. Mary outside the walls):







This is exactly how a VII century church looks like:



The main facade and the protyr before the entrance:



The amazing VII century high-quality frescoes conserved on the interior:



The frescoes are drawn from the Apocryphal Gospel:







The Christus Panthocrator fresco on the abse, of evident oriental style. Look at the face though, look at how the coulours they blends together in a wonderful Sfumato...



High contrast picture:











Beside the incredible frescoes, the interior of this little church looks amazing and extremely ancient:



VII century, 1400 years ago...



the church has no transept, just two round side chapels, one per side.

Left side transept-chapel:



Right side transept-chapel:



The counterfacade:



The scheme of the frescoes depictin the "Incarnation of Christ":



Another image of the interior of the church, with the incredible frescoes well visible in the apsis:



Some more picture of the beautiful exteriors:





The three round apses makin the little church a greek cross one:



The roman-technology like thick wall buttresses all around the transept-chapel:



(I must admit that these side chapels-transept have been rebuilt, but we can be sure that the original structure was reasonably like this)

The main apse, here you can see the authentical thich wall buttresses inspired maybe by the roman technology:







The classical view of the Santa Maria Foris Portas little church in Castelseprio:



All pictures are mine.
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Old May 21st, 2016, 07:35 PM   #1223
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The Santo Stefano Maggiore basilica is one of the oldest in the city of Milan, located just some 300 meters away from the Duomo cathedral.

The original basilica was built in the V century, but what we see nowadays is a delicate and very elegant baroque building, that would need some consistent restorations.

Here many important historical fact took place, like for instance the killing of the Duke of Milan, Galeazzo Maria Sforza in the year 1476, or the baptism of the painter Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, better known as the Caravaggio, in the year 1571.

We have already seen this church in other occasions.

The facade:







This is the remaining part of the portico of the gothic basilica of Santo Stefano where Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan, was killed:



The beautiful baroque bell tower, started in the year 1643 by the architect Carlo Buzzi and finished in the year 1674 by the architect Girolamo Quadrio. To me, this is the most beautiful baroque bell tower of the city:



(This picture is not mine, I found it on Wikimedia Commons)

















Side chapels:









The left side nave apse:









The Trivulzio chapel, the family chapel dedicated to the family Trivulzio, that was very important (for good and for bad) for the history of Milan.

Despite being so severe and unadorned, this chapel is perhaps the architectural masterpiece of this basilica. The archited, Giuseppe Meda, in this chapel -built in the year 1594 in the place of the right nave apse- experimented a language that is somewhat an anticipation of the baroque style: four free standing corinthian columns sustaining four suspended abacuses on wich insist four arches with a spherical vault ("Volta a vela") connecting them. This is a new language, made of suspended elements and the seek of innovative, unseen solutions that characterized the Baroque era.
The first actual Baroque church in Milan is San Giuseppe in Via Verdi, started from the architect Francesco Richini in the year 1607, so here in the Trivulzio chapel by Meda we're 13 years before the arrive of the Baroque style from Rome.













All pictures (except the one I mentioned I found on Wikimedia) are mine.
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Old May 23rd, 2016, 01:40 PM   #1224
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This is the Sant'Alessandro in Zebedia basilica in central Milan, very close to the Duomo cathedral, just some 450 meters away.

It's one of the city's outstanding example of Southern Italian Baroque.

The church is inspired by the mannerist church of Santa Maria Assunta in Carignano, Genoa, by the architect Galeazzo Alessi.
Here the style evolves and reach almost a baroque style. The builting has been started in the year 1602 by the architect Lorenzo Binago and then, for the structural issues (the dome and the weights) the architect was assisted by the starter of the baroque style in Milan: the freat Francesco Maria Richini. The dome was finished in the year 1626, while the exteriors were finished in the year 1658 by Francesco Maria Richini.
The decoration of the interiors continued anyway until the early 1700s.

The plan of the church:



As you can see, this church has a Greek cross shape (equal sized transept and nave) and a central plan, with a huge, deep apse. The transept, the four side chapels and the nave are inscribed in a perfect square. At the crossing of the transept and the nave stands a huge, tall dome. Two twin bell towers crown the dome at both sides as seen from the plaza.

There is a story that the twin bell towers designed in Baroque style, the previous Basilica of Carignano in Genoa and the cathedral of Jaen in Spain migh have been the inspiration for the many similar Spanish colonial Baroque cathedral in Southern and Central America. I have no element to support or to refuse this hypotesis, all I can say is that in the early 1600s Milan was under Spanish rule too.

The facade:





The interiors:









The tall frescoed dome, with the fresco "Paradise", painted by Filippo Abbiati and Federico Bianchi in four years between 1693 and 1697:



Here it's evident the inspiration on Neapolitan models like Luca "Faipresto" Giordano and his many frescoed domes in Naples.

The apse:



The transept:





The apse. Not a single inch of surface has been left wothout a fresco. Incredible!



The counter facade:



The little spherical decorated vaults are everywhere:











The Sacristy of this huge basilica is a baroque marvel:



The wooden carved furniture is mind blowing!



Decorated vault too, of course:



Magic:

















The sacristy has also an amazing altarpiece painting, as soon as I get the credit of it I will tell you who is the author, I can anticipate you -considering the style- that's for sure a late 1500s author.















Details of the painting on the apse:





The apse:













The right transept:



The full view of the interiors as we enter the Basilica:



As you can notice, the church would deserve important works of restoration soon.

All pictures are mine.
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Old May 23rd, 2016, 07:40 PM   #1225
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Grazie per le segnalazioni... Fantastic.


Yesterday with friends, thanks to your recommendations, we went on a trip from Milan to Lodi Vecchio. Viboldone, Melegnano, Vizzolo Predabissi and Lodi Vecchio ... nice trip
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Old May 23rd, 2016, 08:39 PM   #1226
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Hahaha! Dai? Grande, son contento di avervi risolto la domenica, poi col tempo che c'era ieri, meritava una scampagnata!

Well done, Skymino! If you want, please feel free to share some pictures with us, we'll be glad to enjoy them!
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Old May 24th, 2016, 09:10 AM   #1227
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Originally Posted by tommolo View Post
There is a story that the twin bell towers designed in Baroque style, the previous Basilica of Carignano in Genoa and the cathedral of Jaen in Spain migh have been the inspiration for the many similar Spanish colonial Baroque cathedral in Southern and Central America. I have no element to support or to refuse this hypotesis, all I can say is that in the early 1600s Milan was under Spanish rule too.
Jaén Cathedral is one of the jewels of the Spanish Renaissance. It worked Andres de Vandelvira, who is also one of the architects of the Andalusian cities of Ubeda and Baeza, also renaissance and declared by UNESCO. This cathedral has been nominated for world heritage and one of its arguments is that served as a model to many cathedrals in America (Merida, Guadalajara, Guajaca, Puebla, Morelia, Mexico City, Lima, Bogota, Sucre, Cuzco and Antigua Guatemala). It is the same argument that was used for the declaration of La Laguna, city of the Canary Islands, which had a great urban influence in the cities of "new plant" that were founded in Latin America, or for the declaration of Alcala de Henares, the world's first planned university city. It was the original model for the Civitas Dei (City of God), the ideal urban community which Spanish missionaries brought to the Americas. It also served as a model for universities in América.
The argument tommolo is very possible. Obviously Italy was the origin and center of the Renaissance and Baroque and its influence in Europe was immense. Various Italian territories were part of the Spanish monarchy (Naples, Sicily, Sardinia, Milan) and artistic influence was very large: the facade of the cathedral of Jaén is baroque and has a strong Italian influence, genoese artists worked in the sevillian palaces (in Genoa were the main bankers of the Spanish Empire) or one of the great neapolitan baroque architects Cosimo Fanzago left a totally neapolitan work in Salamanca as the church of the Purísima.
This influences not only happened in Western Europe but also in Eastern Europe. Many Italian artists working in Poland, Hungary, Bohemia and Russia. From Krakow to Moscow kremlin through St. Petersburg where the main baroque or neoclassical architects were Italian or of Italian origin: Rastrelli, Quarenghi, Rinaldi or Carlo Rossi.
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Old May 24th, 2016, 11:59 AM   #1228
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Always very precise and extremely interesting to read! Thank you for your contributions!

Yes, the influence of the wonderful cathedral of Jaén is out of doubt for the whole Latina Americas (I never saw it in person but I hope to do so anytime soon! By the way I love the Jaén accent, it's so musical!). In particular, the Puebla cathedral is clearly modeled upon Jaén cathedral.

What I meant in my post is that I'm not able to bring on any proof that the basilica of Sant'Alessandro in Milan was a later influence too for the Southern-Central American Baroque...I'm still investigating but there are hardly any evidence between Milan and the Colonial Spain overseas...the only possible link that I'm investigating was through the missionaries. Lorenzo Binago was the first architect of Sant'Alessandro, and he was a Barnabite priest, whose positions are somehow very close to the Jesuite order that at the time (early 1600s) had many misiones in Mexico. We know that Milan was a very important centre for the Counter reformation and the early Baroque era, exactly when the missioners started to go to Americas and Asia. As far as I know, Barnabites like Binago in the early 1600s were headed to missions in Asia and not latin America. I'll try to learn more about this issue.

What is striking is for example the analogy between the Old Cathedral of Guadalupe (1682-1702) and the Sant'Alessandro in Milan (1602-1658):



What king of connection may have been there? (if any, as it could perfectly have been just a chance)
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Old May 24th, 2016, 12:36 PM   #1229
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Certainly has to be some kind of influence, either directly or indirectly. Jaén Cathedral is Renaissance but its façade is Baroque and strong Italian imprint, analogies with the Basilica of genoa or the example of Milan are obvious, just look at pictures.
The influence can also be direct, when the dynastic union between Spain and Portugal (1580-1640), many Italian religious, through the Congregatio de Propaganda Fide, carried out missions in Asia, America or Africa, very prominent examples were the Jesuits: Alessandro Valignano, Michele Ruggieri and Matteo Ricci in China and Japan (they got to use Chinese dresses, similar to those wise followers of Confucius) or Roberto Nobili in Madurai (India).
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Old May 26th, 2016, 11:53 PM   #1230
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Yes, there are many common features between the baroque styles gathered around the world not only through colonization, but also through missionaries, for example many buildings in Philippines are somewhat related to Churringueresque baroque very popular in Central and Southern America...Thank you for your comments, always very welcomed!

This is the Cathedral of Pavia (31 kms south of Milan), better known as the "Duomo".
It is one of the finest Renaissance architecture in Northern Italy, it has been designed by the genius of the architect Giovanni Antonio Amadeo (but some says it's the Bramante), and the building of the Cathedral begun in the year 1488. What strikes most of the interior is its elegance and its shining light, an effect gave by the white marbles and the huge circular windows everywhere in the church. The dome is incredibly tall and wide at once, it is one of the tallest in italy (92 meters tall!) and 30 meters wide. The cathedral should have been somewhat longer, but was never completed. The exteriors today still waits for its marble covering.

This cathedral was a monument wanted by the brother of Ludovico il Moro, the last of the Sforzas, Dukes of Milan: the Cardinal Ascanio Sforza, at that time in Rome. We say that because some years later Bramante will start working to another big dome in Rome, the dome of Saint Peter in the Vatican. There are many common points between the two projects, for example in the shape of the pillars sustaining the dome, or in the mixed central/latin cross design. The Amadeo, with a likely help by Bramante, designed an interesting church crowned by a huge dome, following an idea that will be developed later by the Bramante in Rome, in the huge canteer of the new Saint Peter in the Vatican.

In the years 1487, a project of the new cathedral of Pavia were showed to the Cardinal Ascanio Sforza, comparing the new building to nonetheless than the Hagia Sophia in Costantinople, now Istanbul. The definitive design was undoubtedly influenced bu the Hagia Sophia, for instance in the lightning scheme of the windows and the many arches and pillars sustaining the huge dome.

So, the reference for the cathedral of Pavia were Saint Peter in the Vatican and Hagia Sophia in Costantinople...not bad huh?

The original plan of the Amadeo, only half of the spans of the main nave have been actually achieved. The building now has a pefect greek cross, and it measures 83 meters at the transept and 83 meters from the apse to the main entrance, with some 3000 square meters of surface, one of the biggest in Lombardy. The vault of the main nave is very high too, 30 meters high!

As you enter, this is what you see:



Seriously, every single time I enter this cathedral, I remain in awe of this amazing, delicate marble beauty, a real marvel of Lombardy.



The huge dome that dominates the interior:



No words, a true masterpiece:







The main apse and a side apse on the right:



Detail of the Baroque side apse on the right of the main apse:



A Renaissance side apse on the left of the main apse:



The light, the quintessential element of this church:







Pure Renaissance:



The short nave that leads to the huge dome:



The tall dome:



This shows the forest of arches, pillars capitals that sustain the huge dome, a delicate and complex marvelous mechanism of aequilibrium and proportions:





The main nave:



The pillars are very geometrically shaped and proportioned, they looks like sharp "crystals" of marble:











The counter facade as seen from under the dome:













Right under the dome. Amazing!



The main apse:



And the counter facade:



The left transept:















An amazing masterpiece in a side chapel of the transept, the "Madonna del Rosario", painted by the pavese artist Bernardino Gatti, called "Il Sojaro", in the year 1531 :





The right transept chapel:



This chapel has a true masterpiece of sculpture, a basrelief that seems made with ivory:



The main apse decoration:









The wooden carved pulprit:





The counterfacade:



Just two more pictures:



Renaissance is all about the perfect proportion:



The tall dome as seen from the Piazza della Vittoria:







The 92 meters tall dome (or 97 meters, depends from the source) as seen from the plaza:











The two symbols of the beautiful Pavia, the "Ponte Coperto" (covered bridge) and the dome of the Duomo:



All pictures are mine.
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Old May 27th, 2016, 10:26 PM   #1231
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Originally Posted by tommolo View Post
A little, unknown jewel from the outskirts of Milan, in the city of Melzo, 19 kms east of the Duomo cathedral of Milan.
Here you can see the very small church of Sant'Andrea, which has some surprise on the inside, even if the exterior may be somewhat dull and only the use of the bricks connotate this building as an actually ancient building.-andrea-lampugnani.jpg[/IMG]

Detail of the beautiful Leonardesque fresco on the apse of the church, by the Moietta:



Look at the beautiful and sweet face of the enthroned Madonna...wow! It reminds me of Leonardo, of Cesare da Sesto, of Bernardino Luini and so on!

More pictures with higher definition:



These last 4 pictures with higher details have been taken from the JuzaPhoto's profile of the user Valerio74
So beautiful - a treasure in that small exquisite church.
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Old May 27th, 2016, 10:31 PM   #1232
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Santissimo Redentore church, in the Porta Venezia district of central Milan. This church is one of the most faithful example of philological neoromanesque church in Milan,
it has been built between the years 1898 and 1900 by the architect Luigi Macchi.Detail of the statue on the main altar:

Marvelous.
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“In keeping silent about evil, in burying it so deep within us that no sign of it appears on the surface, we are implanting it, and it will rise up a thousand fold in the future. When we neither punish nor reproach evildoers we are thereby ripping the foundations of justice from beneath new generations.”

“The meaning of earthly existence lies not, as we have grown used to thinking, in prospering but in the development of the soul.”
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

"We are more closely connected to the invisible than to the visible"

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Old May 27th, 2016, 10:42 PM   #1233
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This is the Sant'Alessandro in Zebedia basilica in central Milan, very close to the Duomo cathedral, just some 450 meters away.

It's one of the city's outstanding example of Southern Italian Baroque.

The church is inspired by the mannerist church of Santa Maria Assunta in Carignano, Genoa, by the architect Galeazzo Alessi.
Here the style evolves and reach almost a baroque style. The builting has been started in the year 1602 by the architect Lorenzo Binago and then, for the structural issues (the dome and the weights) the architect was assisted by the starter of the baroque style in Milan: the freat Francesco Maria Richini. The dome was finished in the year 1626, while the exteriors were finished in the year 1658 by Francesco Maria Richini.
The decoration of the interiors continued anyway until the early 1700s.

The plan of the church:


As you can see, this church has a Greek cross shape (equal sized transept and nave) and a central plan, with a huge, deep apse. The transept, the four side chapels and the nave are inscribed in a perfect square. At the crossing of the transept and the nave stands a huge, tall dome. Two twin bell towers crown the dome at both sides as seen from the plaza.

There is a story that the twin bell towers designed in Baroque style, the previous Basilica of Carignano in Genoa and the cathedral of Jaen in Spain migh have been the inspiration for the many similar Spanish colonial Baroque cathedral in Southern and Central America. I have no element to support or to refuse this hypotesis, all I can say is that in the early 1600s Milan was under Spanish rule too.

The transept:





The apse. Not a single inch of surface has been left wothout a fresco. Incredible!
As you can notice, the church would deserve important works of restoration soon.

All pictures are mine.
One of the most magnificent churches on your wonderful thread.

The apse by itself makes the church worth seeing and spending time.
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“In keeping silent about evil, in burying it so deep within us that no sign of it appears on the surface, we are implanting it, and it will rise up a thousand fold in the future. When we neither punish nor reproach evildoers we are thereby ripping the foundations of justice from beneath new generations.”

“The meaning of earthly existence lies not, as we have grown used to thinking, in prospering but in the development of the soul.”
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

"We are more closely connected to the invisible than to the visible"

-Novalis

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Old May 27th, 2016, 11:13 PM   #1234
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Now we're about to go to see the beautiful and full of light church of San Giorgio in Bernate Ticino, 29 kms west of the Duomo cathedral of Milan.
The architect of this chuch is Martino Bassi, who completed this church in late Renaissance style in the year 1582. The frescoes and the decoration have been made in the early XX century though. There is also an interesting palace beside of this church, the so-called "canonica", that is from the 1500s. On the inside of the canonica, you can see the beautiful cloister showed at the bottom of this post.
The amazing dome:



All pictures are mine.
Glorious and so filled with light pouring in on the beauty.
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Old June 2nd, 2016, 02:05 AM   #1235
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Thank you Timothy for your always appreciated comment!
It's a pleasure for me to share the things I'm passionate about with a small but interested community!

This is a small jewel I recently discovered in Pavia (30 kms south of Milan), the Santissimo Salvatore church, somewhat outside the city centre. I actually did not knew it! But when I walked into the church, my jaw dropped, so much beauty and I did not know! This pretty much did my day!

Quite plain Renaissance exteriors, unachieved. Later I discovered that the design of this church is probably to be attributed to the Giovanni Antonio Amadeo, the architect of the Duomo of Pavia.



The building begun in the year 1467 and continued until the year 1511. The church has been built in a late Gothic/early Renaissance style.



(sorry for the car, there was a very unappropriate parking in front of the church, as I said, this church is outside the main touristical routes)

The interior is really amazing! The Renaissance decorations and frescoes have been painted by Bernardino de' Rossi and Bernardino Lanzani, two pavese artists from the late 1400s/early 1500s.













The beautiful stuccoed dome:



The magnificent organ:



The counterfacade:









The side chapels seen though the passage from one chapel to another:



The view from the entrance:







All pictures are mine.
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Last edited by tommolo; June 2nd, 2016 at 11:25 AM.
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Old June 5th, 2016, 01:58 AM   #1236
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This is the Sant'Angelo church, in central Milan, in the lively and dynamic district of Porta Nuova, very close to the Milan financial district.

For some reason, this huge monument, built half in Mannerist style and half in Baroque style, is not very known by the tourists and the milanese people too.
It's hidden in a very nice plaza, quiet and hidden by tall trees. No one seems to notice it, but it's definitely worth a visit, and two and three too!

This is actually one of the biggest churches in Milan! When you enter you just think: "Hey! What a spacious church!"
It's 82 meters long from the facade to the apse and 32 meters wide. The nave is a single barrel-vaulted hall that measures 45,5 m x 19,5 m.
The church covers an area of almos 2200 square meters, by far one of the biggest churches in Milan and surrounding area.

The church of Sant'Angelo has been built between the year 1552 and the year 1630, exactly halfway between Mannerism and Baroque.
The architect who designed the church was Domenico Giunti, a tuscan architect that was called by the then Spanish governor of Milan, Ferrante Gonzaga from Mantua. Ferrante Gonzaga was a man of close confidence for the Empereor Charles V, and the fact that he was from Mantua is very important, because the architect Domenico Giunti in the interiors of this church probably drew inspiration from the famous Sant'Andrea basilica of Mantua, designed by the Renaissance genius Leon Battista Alberti: both churches have a huge, single nave and a tall barrel vault.

Now, the church has a "T" shape, with a long and wide nave, built in mannerist syle, closed by a frescoed triumphal arch, and a short and narrow transept and an apse with a choir, decorated in an excellent Baroque style. The one who visit this church, will have the impression of visiting two different churches, built and decorated in two different times. But it isn't so, is the church that has been built in a period of huge changes in art history.

The facade:



(pictures from the webside Whereinmilan.com)



(picture from Wikimedia Commons)

Now let's go with my pictures of the huge interiors:













The frescoed triumphal arch, with the frescoes by the Legnanino, dedicated to the Crowning of the Virgin Mary:



The counterfacade:



Some side chapel:



The triumphal arch and behind it the huge transept and the apse:



The marvelous transept and the apse:



The main entrance as seen from the transept:





This is by far the most beautiful part of the church:







a chapel at the end of the left side of the transept:



The apse:













The interior is very rich of paintings too, even though this church has been greatly damaged by the spoliations of Napoleon when he came to Milan.
The masterpiece is perhaps the painting by Gaudenzio Ferrari, a great Old Master of the Italian Cinquecento (1500s), entitled "The martyrdom of St. Catherine of Alexandria. As a side notice, there is some who thinks that St Catherine of Alexandria would be the "cristianization" of the great philosoper and mathematician Hipatia of Alexandria, one of the most important woman of her time.
Here's the masterpiece by Gaudenzio Ferrari dedicated to her:



(from Wikimedia Commons)

All pictures but the first two and the last one are mine.
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Last edited by tommolo; June 5th, 2016 at 03:00 AM.
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Old June 5th, 2016, 04:07 AM   #1237
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San Bartolomeo Nuovo church in central Milan, Porta Nuova district, very close to the previous church of Sant'Angelo. Both churches are on Via della Moscova street.

This is a "new" church, built in neo-Renaissance, revivalist style in the year 1864 in substitution of a previous church that was destroyed in 1861 in the operation for demolition of the narrow medieval Porta Nuova after which all the district is named.

The neo-Renaissance church was built by the architect Maurizio Garavaglia, who designed it with a mixed greek cross with a deep apse, crowned by a small dome.



(picture from Wikimedia Commons)

The austere yet luminous interiors:



The dome:



The apse:



The counterfacade (sorry it's blurry):



The right transept:



Detail of the painting:



(Picture from Wikimedia Commons)

The left transept:



This is one of the artworks that were in the previous church of San Bartolomeo and was brought in the new church. This is the funerary monument dedicated to Carlo di Firmian, the plenipotentiary of the Austrian regime in Lombardy. The beautiful neoclassical sculpture was created by the artist Giuseppe Franchi (that also realized the facade decorations of the Royal Palace of Milan). The tomb was removed during the Napolenic rule and then was brought back during the Restoration.



(Picture from Wikimedia Commons)

All pictures without credits below are mine.
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Old June 8th, 2016, 01:51 AM   #1238
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In this thread we are used to see the many wonderful churches in the city center of Milan or in the historic centres of the many cities and towns around it, but we seldom see what the Milan's ouskirts looks like in terms of ancient religious architecture. Are Milan's peripherical districts dulls and pointless for the topic of this thread? There are just commie-blocks and tall apartment buildings? Well, if you think so, you actually might be quite wrong. Outside Milan there are a plethora of small, ancient former agricultural borough that once stood on its own, faraway from the metropolis, each one with its church, its history and its monuments. In a number of cases, those small, isolated monuments are still there.

A quite interesting exampe might be the ancient parish church of San Giovanni Battista in Trenno, a small church built by the architect Aurelio Trezzi between the years 1635 and 1655 in a classy, elegant Baroque style.

The exteriors, in pictures taken from the professional pjotographer Stefano "Gusme" Gusmeroli:









Here you are the interiors:







The counterfacade:



Here you are the surprise of this church, you can start to see it clear here!



In Milan and in Lombardy, classical art is so deeply rooted that you can easily find a masterpiece even in a remote, small church of the periphery! This is the huge painting "Adoration of the Magi", painted before the year 1657 by the baroque German painter Johann Christoph Storer. The painting is really huge, some 2,7 m X 3,2 m, and here the Storer show us all the influence that painters like Rubens had on him. This painting is so "Rubenesque" that prior to the restorations, the scholars thought it was a painting created by the school of Rubens.

Storer, one of the main german baroque painters of the 1600s, lived in Milan from the year 1640 to the year 1657, and studied with the great artist Ercole Procaccini. The storer painted many frescoes in Milan (in the Sant'Eustorgio basilica) and also in the splendid Charterhouse of Pavia.





Another one, with an higher definition:



Surprisingly beautiful for a small church from the outskirts, huh?

Except the first four photos by Stefano Gusmeroli, all the other pictures are mine.
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Old June 10th, 2016, 04:00 AM   #1239
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Another interesting example of a small, rural district in Milan is the case of Figino, that still have a sort of a mini-historical district, separated from the suburbs of Milan but still part of the municipality.

It has a very small and very low church that has been built at the beginning of the XX century in an ecleptic style. Despite its size, it's quite interesting to notice how even the smallest communities wanted a beautiful and appropriate symbol as a parish church back in the early 1900s.
Today, this is by far the smallest and most isolated district of the Municipality of Milan, with just 1598 inhabitants and a distance of some 9 kms from the Duomo cathedral of Milan.



(picture by Panoramio user Luigi Petrazzoli)



(picture by Panoramio user Ilda Casati)

And now my pictures about the small interiors:

















All pictures without mentioned credits are mine.

Last edited by tommolo; June 10th, 2016 at 04:08 AM.
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Old June 11th, 2016, 12:17 AM   #1240
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