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Old June 11th, 2016, 04:20 AM   #1241
tommolo
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Sanctuary of Santa Maria del Fonte at Caravaggio, better known as the Sactuary of Caravaggio, 36 kms east of the Duomo cathedral of Milan.

The Sanctuary is dedicated to a miracle: the Apparition of the Virgin on May 26 of the year 1432 to the young peasant Giannetta de' Marchi.
It's something like a small Lourdes or Fatima, many people, overall ill people, try to get there to have their prayers fulfilled,
a small spring, said to be miraculous, is located under the Sanctuary.

The building of the Sanctuary started 1575 according the design of the architect Pellegrino Tibaldi, strongly wanted by the
Archbishop of Milan of that time, the famous Charles Borromeo. The building continued until the XVIII century.

The dimensions of the building are huge: 93 meters long and 33 meters wide, 22 meters under the vault and a tall dome 64 meters high,
making it one of the most impressive religious building in Lombardy.

The exteriors:





















The wonderful interiors:















The crypt:

















The tall dome:



All pictures are mine.
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Old June 11th, 2016, 04:28 AM   #1242
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Another Sanctuary, relatively close to the one in Caravaggio, is the Sanctuary of Santa Maria della Misericordia in Castelleone, located near Crema, 49 kms south east of the Duomo cathedral of Milan.

This church is a marvel of terracotta and brickworks decoration, a technique that here in Lombardy reached its highest artistical peaks.
The small but precious church is dedicated to a miracle: an Apparition of the Virgin to a peasant, Domenica Zanenga, in the year 1511.

This jewel of terracotta has been built by a terracotta master, the sculptor and architect Agostino de' Fondulis, between the years 1513 and 1525.
Agostino de Fondulis also worked (as a sculptor) on the Bramantesque basilica of Santa Maria presso San Satiro in central Milan., and both churches have a similar structure and overall design feeling. It may be meaning that Agostino de Fondulis maybe drew inspiration from the Bramante's basilica, or Bramante have designed this one in Castelleone too or even that Santa Maria presso San Satiro have been designed also by Agostino de Fondulis, we'll never know that. The interior frescoes have probably been painted by the pseudo Bramantino. We have a lot of important names working or having been used as an inspiration here: Agostino de Fondulis, Giovanni Antonio Amadeo, Bramante, the pseudo Bramantino...

What's important in this church are probably the exteriors. The dome is clearly inspired in the Renaissance architecture of Giovanni Antonio Amadeo or Bramante, and the abundant and regular, geometrical outside terracotta decorations seems to be an anticipation on the Mannerism.

What is out of question is the profound sense of harmony, proportion and balance that this small jewel of the Renaissance releases still today.
Equilibrium, elegance, style, in a word: beauty.

The exteriors:

























The interiors:









The very harmonious dome:



















[IMG]AAAAAAAAO1Y[/IMG]



























All pictures are mine.
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Old June 15th, 2016, 07:58 PM   #1243
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Let's continue with others churches from the peripherical districts of Milan.

San Michele Arcangelo church in Precotto, built in the years 1865-1866 by the architect and engineer Emanuele Odazio.



(picture found on Panoramio)

Quite great interiors:













The apse:







__________________________________________________

And this is another one, San Martino in Greco church, built at the end of 1500s in the peripherical borough of Greco, relatively near to the railway station of Milano Centrale.

The facade is actually beautiful:





(the two previous pictures are to be credited to www.comunitapastoralegorettigreco.it)

The interiors, in the typical artistical language of the late 1500s:







The counter facade:





All pictures without other credits are mine.
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Old June 15th, 2016, 08:23 PM   #1244
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Santa Giustina in Affori church, in the nice and well preserved historical borough of Affori.

This quite big neoclassical church has been built between the years 1853 and 1857 by the architect Giacomo Moraglia, one of the most
important architect in the mid-XIX century Lombardy, that still was under the Austrian rule.

The exteriors:



(from Wikimedia Commons)

Ok, this is not a "minor" church, it's only peripehrical, but it's quite great. With an hidden gem too, as we will see later!

The interiors with the beautiful frescoes, painted in the year 1927 by the artist Achille Albertazzi.















Lights entering from the transept:



















Quite great huh? And now the surprise I mentioned you before:
The best copy of the Virgin of the Rocks by Leonardo da Vinci in Milan! I've seen it live, and believe me, the quality it's stunning! Many would say that the best copy of the leonardesque Virgin of the Rocks in Milan is the Vergine delle Rocce del Borghetto, kept in a Monastery near the Sant'Ambrogio basilica. But I disagree, this is qualitatively even better! In the past years, many hipotized a direct intervention of the Master himself, Leonardo, and also the description of the artwork in the church actually mention it, overall in the face of the Virgin. Now, it's more likely attributed to another "king size" of the Milanese Renaissance, the Leonardesque artist Bernardino Luini. I would probably attribute to another great Leonardesque painter, Giovanni Antonio de Predis, because of the delicacy in the colours and the kind of "Sfumato" used here. What's your opinion?

Here you are, ready for your opinions:











_________________________________________________

And this is the last church that we'll see today.
This is the Beata Vergine Assunta in Bruzzano church, built in the 1930s in the peripherical district of Bruzzano. I'm not gonna lie to you, in the borough of Bruzzano, not much of its historical district has remained, compared to others peripherical districts relatively well preserved. But still, we will se an interesting artistical surprise too!

The facade of church of the Beata Vergine Assunta may be not a masterpiece of architecture:



(from Wikimedia Commons)

The church and the main plaza of the borough of Bruzzano:



(from the website: www.to.chiesadimilano.it)

The interiors, maybe not a marvel, but still nice. It's just a peripherical small church, not a cathedral after all.
They're OK.





What is absolutely surprising with this church, is that you'll find yourself face to face with a true Renaissance fresco! Oh yeah! Great quality artworks even in the apparently most uninspiring peripherical church! What a surprise!

The Baptism of Christ, dating back to the early 1500s, by the great Leonardesque artist Bernardino Luini (and/or a follower):



Ah, the delicacy and the elegance of the Renaissance! What a beautiful sfumato you can appreciate here!



These coulours are 500 years old and they're still so beautiful!



What a surprise, huh? So, now you know. When you're in Milan, even if you're in a peripeherical district, never underestimate the little church around the corner, because it may contain a little artistical jewel that will totally make your day!

All pictures without other credits are mine.
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Old June 20th, 2016, 12:43 PM   #1245
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A last one church from the outskirts of Milan is the very little and the really pretty Sant'Antonino in Segnano church, a church whose first notice recorded dates back to the year 1178. The Romanesque building has been since then altered and decorated, but the original structure still stands still.

The peculiarity of this chapel is that is very close to the Bicocca district of Milan (now a University), a place that in 1522 saw the Battle of Bicocca between the Imperial-Spanish troops of Charles V against the troops of Francis I of France, that believed to be the legitimate heir of the Duchy of Milan. The battle was fought on April, 27 of 1522, and was the starting point of rivalry that will bring to the huge field battle of Pavia in 1525, that will see the emperor-king of Spain Charles V win against the French troops of Francis I, conquering Milan to the Empire.

All these events are portrayed here in this small chapel, that was very likely used for spiritual assistance during the near Battle of Bicocca of 1522.

Ok, we're done now with the history, let's see the chapel, ok?

The exteriors:



(picture taken from Urbanfile.org)



(picture taken from Urbanfile.org)

In the exteriors, the original rural Romanesque structure is still somewhat readable.

The interiors:





The fresco representing the Battle of Bicocca of 1522:









The apsis, a "modern" adding to an ancient church:





The counterfacade:













The Battle of Bicocca:















The apse, added after Second Vatican Council of 1962-65, adding the ancient frescoes of two saints:





All pictures without credits are mine.
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Old June 20th, 2016, 01:30 PM   #1246
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Ok, after all these wonderful ancient buildings that we've seen in the last weeks, here you are a relatively "modern" church, this is the huge basilica of Santi Nabore e Felice, a quite big parish that stands in the southwestern part of Milan, in the district called Primaticcio.

This church has been started in 1931 by the will of the Archbishop of Milan, Ildefonso Schuster. Its tall facade stands just in front of the biggest Barracks of Milan, the Caserma Perrucchetti. So it is nowadays somewhat related to all the celebrations and events that involves militaries.

The exterior is imposing in dimensions, but rather plain to me. Nevertheless, you can easily guess that this church is from the 30s just looking at it, for its "symplificated neoclassical" style of the Novecento, a kind of Art Deco related movement that was developed in Italy in that period.



(picture from Panoramio user Ilda Casati)

The interiors:











The apsis is really interesting, overall the windowed dome right above the altar:







The counter facade:



There are no transept, just two apsis at the end on two side chapels right and left of the main apse.



Detail of the beautiful and tall stained glass dome above the altar:



Detail of the beautifuul apse and of course of the monumental baldachin (or ciborium, as it is called in here) above the altar, very typical of the early Romanesque churches of Lombardy.



Another image of the side chapel in the left of the main apse, in an image taken from the Panoramio user Ilda Casati.



All pictures are mine, except the first and the last one, credited to Panoramio user Ilda Casati.
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Old June 22nd, 2016, 12:28 AM   #1247
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Santa Maria Assunta in Vigentino church, a small church now under restoration.
This church is located in the peripherical Milanese district of the Vigentino, 3,5 km south of the Duomo.
This church has been built in the 1600s, but scholars believe that in the place of the Baroque church, once stood a small church built
probably in Carolingian era. In the year 1162, when Milan was destroyed by Frederick Barbarossa, here at the Vigentino a community
of refugees from central Milan, from the destroyed walled city, found hospitality, help and medical cares.
Just to remind that not long ago, Europeans too were refugees.

Here you are the exteriors, in some pictures taken by the photographer Stefano Gusmeroli:











(all the previous pictures have been shot by Stefano "Gusme" Gusmeroli)

Now, actually the church is obviously closed, they're doing the floors, but if you kindly ask to the bricklayer, chances are that they'll let you in he he!

So, here it goes a sneak preview of the church under restoration. Hopefully, in some months the works will be finished and I hope to shoot better pictures of the beautiful Baroque interiors:









(all pictures of this batch are mine)

By the way, the church is a small jewel, but it definitely needed restoration! I hope that the works will continue not only for the floors but also for the rest of the interiors and the stuccoes and decorations.
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Old June 22nd, 2016, 01:07 AM   #1248
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Thank you tommolo, very interesting, especially the church of Santa Maria della Misericordia in Castelleone, very beautiful. I did not know. Another gem I did not know is the copy of Leonardo in Affori.
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Old June 22nd, 2016, 04:21 AM   #1249
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommolo View Post
A last one church from the outskirts of Milan is the very little and the really pretty Sant'Antonino in Segnano church, a church whose first notice recorded dates back to the year 1178. The Romanesque building has been since then altered and decorated, but the original structure still stands still.

The peculiarity of this chapel is that is very close to the Bicocca district of Milan (now a University), a place that in 1522 saw the Battle of Bicocca between the Imperial-Spanish troops of Charles V against the troops of Francis I of France, that believed to be the legitimate heir of the Duchy of Milan. The battle was fought on April, 27 of 1522, and was the starting point of rivalry that will bring to the huge field battle of Pavia in 1525, that will see the emperor-king of Spain Charles V win against the French troops of Francis I, conquering Milan to the Empire.

All these events are portrayed here in this small chapel, that was very likely used for spiritual assistance during the near Battle of Bicocca of 1522.

Ok, we're done now with the history, let's see the chapel, ok?

The apse, added after Second Vatican Council of 1962-65, adding the ancient frescoes of two saints:





All pictures without credits are mine.
I love this wonderful chapel. I love it.
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“In keeping silent about evil, in burying it so deep within us that no sign of it appears on the surface, we are implanting it, and it will rise up a thousand fold in the future. When we neither punish nor reproach evildoers we are thereby ripping the foundations of justice from beneath new generations.”

“The meaning of earthly existence lies not, as we have grown used to thinking, in prospering but in the development of the soul.”
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Old June 22nd, 2016, 12:48 PM   #1250
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skymino View Post
Thank you tommolo, very interesting, especially the church of Santa Maria della Misericordia in Castelleone, very beautiful. I did not know. Another gem I did not know is the copy of Leonardo in Affori.
Eh eh! Thank you for your comments, Skymino and TimothyR!
The countryside in that region is extremely well preserved, I grew up in Abbiategrasso, and in the vast fields of rice and wheat of Treviglio, Caravaggio and Castelleone i find myself at home!

By the way, the Santuario della Misericordia is amazing, but there was another church in Castelleone absolutely worth a mention: the Santa Maria in Bressanoro! Unluckily the battery of my camera decide to die right before visiting it so I could not post any picture, but it's really amazing!

The Santa Maria in Bressanoro is one of the most ancient churches around Crema, the earliest mention of it dates back to the year 842.
The church we see today, with its early Renaissance architecture, dates back to the year 1461 by the will of Bianca Maria Visconti, the Duchess of Milan and wife of Francesco Sforza. And most important of all, Bianca Maria was born in Abbiategrasso too eheh!

The structure has a greek cross plan with a dome at the crossing, and it is considered one of the earliest proto-bramantesque architectures in Lombardy. We do not know the name of the architect, unluckily, but we know that the artists that worked inside in the decorations are of the school of the Malosso.

Interesting how both in Santa Maria della Misericordia and in Santa Maria in Bressanoro we can appreciate a strong Bramantesque influence.

Here you are what it looks like:





The interiors are incredibly beautiful, completely covered with frescoes:







And all this beauty just 48 kilometers east of the Duomo! Definitely worth a visit!
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Old June 23rd, 2016, 08:52 PM   #1251
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tommolo fantastic explanations, mixture of erudition but also of pedagogy
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Old June 24th, 2016, 07:19 PM   #1252
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Thank you dear Franciscoc! I'm just passionate about art, history and landscapes, and I try to share my interest here!

This one I'm about to present you now it's an absolute masterpiece to me, so I will present you very quickly and let images tell you everything. Words are not necessary here.

This is San Pietro al Monte in Civate, near Lecco, a city on the Lake Como. This abbey is located at the top of Mount Cornizzolo, in the Prealpi Lombarde, the Lombard Alps,
some 42 kilometers north of the Duomo cathedral of Milan. It's easily reachable by train in 1 hour trip from Garibaldi railway station, but to get on top of the 662 meters high
mountain, you at least need one hour. But what you see after totally deserves the effort.
The San Pietro al Monte in Civate church dates back to the half of XI century and it's one of the most interesting monuments of the First Romanesque Style,
also called Lombard Romanesque style.

I hope you enjoy these pictures as I enjoyed the place, it's a real Paradise!

























The romanesque apsis:







The semicircular atrium:









Detail of the fresco above the main entrance:











The main entrance:





The lower church of San Benedetto, a small Romanesque building:











(all pictures are mine)

Continues with part 2
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Old June 24th, 2016, 07:47 PM   #1253
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San Pietro al Monte in Civate abbey, part 2, the interiors:











The early Romanesque frescoes above the main entrance, that once was the apsis:









The fresco representing Saint Peter, to whom the church is dedicated:



Frescoes on the walls of the church:



The counter facade, that once was the main apsis:







Renaissance and Baroque frescoes:





















At the entrance, in the lower part, the griffin and a chimaera, they represent the evil, and they won't enter the church:





Frescoes on the entrance:















Detail of the beautiful Renaissance fresco of the Virgin Mary:





(All pictures are mine)

Continues with part 3
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Old June 24th, 2016, 08:26 PM   #1254
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San Pietro al Monte in Civate abbey, part 3.

Here it goes the masterpiece of this marvellous church, the Romanesque ciborium (or Baldachin) above the main altar. It's stikingly similar to the Ciborium of Angilbertus in the Sant'Ambrogio basilica of Milan, the mother of all Lombard Romanesque churches.
It's unknown if the two ciboriums have been realized by the same team of artists,
but it sounds very likely to me to tell you the truth.

















The beautiful Romanesque balaustrade with decorations in stucco, a masterpiece to me! from here you can take the stairs down to the crypt:



The crypt is truly amazing, with its delicious stucco decorations still there after 900 years! Incredible! They represent a "Dormitio Virginis", the death of Our Lady and her assumption to Heaven.















The "Dormitio Verginis", or the death and assumption of the Virgin Mary:



Early Romanesque frescoes, still with Byzanthine influence:





All pictures are mine.
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Old June 26th, 2016, 02:39 AM   #1255
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Let's continue with a few more churches that we haven't seen before from the outskirts.
These I'm gonna show you here may not be masterpieces, but represent anyway interesting peripherical revivalist examples, built when Milan was booming. They tried to build a "community" also with this kind of revivalist architecture and public structures.

The first one is actually one of the most interesting late neo-romanesque building in Milan, it's San Giovanni in Bicocca church, built in 1928.

Unluckily, the very modern and ugly facade makes it looks like a recent church, but it is actually almos 100 years old. It would deserves a better facade to me.



(From the webside www.quotidiano.net)

If you check it out here, you will surely notice how the modern facade has been unhappily been build later above a previous, neo Romanesque building.

The very elegant, simple and beauty neo-Romanesque interiors are evident just entering inside the church:



(Picture by Flickr user Renagrisa)

A side chapel:



(Picture by Flickr user Renagrisa)

Another, specular side chapel on the other side of the nave:

image hosted on flickr


(Picture by Flickr user Renagrisa)















- The second church is San Nicola Vescovo in Dergano, this time the Revivalist style chosen for this peripherical church is the Neo-Renaissance.

Unluckily, the high facade is unfinished:



(From the website www.chiesadimilano.it)

The interiors are in sober neo-Renaissance style, and the dimensions of the church are grandiose for a church in the peripherical borough of Dergano:







Frescoed side chapels:





- The third church I'm gonna talk about here is the little chapel of Santa Maria Assunta in Città Studi, the University district of Milan, in the north-east part of the city. This small church has been built between 1950 and 1951 by the architect Giovanni Maggi, that we know for having designed one of the biggest churches of the XX century in Milan, the huge Basilica dei Santi Nereo e Achilleo. Here the exterior style is the same, even if much smaller:



(Image found in Wikimedia Commons, picture taken by Friederichstrasse)

The interiors shows a perfect and elegant neo-Romanesque style instead:












(Image found in Wikimedia Commons, picture taken by Friederichstrasse)

(All the pictures without credit are mine)
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Old June 27th, 2016, 11:56 AM   #1256
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Fantastiche
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Old July 1st, 2016, 01:28 AM   #1257
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Thank you!

Madonna delle Lacrime sanctuary in Treviglio, Between Milan and Bergamo, some 32 kms east of the Duomo cathedral of Milan.

This Sanctuary is dedicated to a miracle of an image of the Virgin Mary that started to cry during the war in 1522 betwenn the Spanish-Imperial troops of Charles V and the french troops of Francis I. Treviglio was destined to be tore down by French troops, but the miracle of the Virgin Mary moved the soul of the french General Odet de Foix, very devoted to the Virgin Mary, and this saved the whole city of Treviglio.

Under the influence of Charles Borromeo, the miracle was recognized in year 1583 and the building of the Sanctuary started in the year 1594, under the direction of the architect Tolomeo Rinaldi. The Sanctuary of the Madonna delle Lacrime of Treviglio was finished in 1619 and dedicated on June 16, 1619 by the cardinal Federigo Borromeo.

The exteriors:





The amazing baroque interiors:













The main apse:



The tall dome:











A side chapel huge painting:





The counter facade:





The frescoed vaul of the main nave:



The tall dome as seen from behind the apse. As you can see, also this sanctuary is under restoration, like half of Lombardy's monuments right now



All pictures are mine.
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Old July 1st, 2016, 01:58 AM   #1258
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San Martino basilica in Treviglio, some 32 kms east of the Duomo cathedral of Milan.

The first church in this place was a pre-romanesque temple dedicated to the Assumption of the Virgin. In the year 1008, the basilica
was dedicate to Saint Martin of Tours. In the year 1482 the basilica was trasformed and heavily modified in the typical Lombard brick gothic style, using the previous civic tower as the new bell tower of the basilica. The facade was modified in an exhuberand late baroque style in the year 1740 by the architect Giovanni Ruggeri.

The exteriors:



The 65 meters high bell tower is one of the tallest in Lombardy. It was built around year 1000 as the civic tower of Treviglio.







The baroque interiors:











The counter facade:









The main apse:



The absolute masterpiece of this basilica, and one of the highest peak of all early Renaissace art in the whole Northern Italy, the Polyptych of San Martino, by Bernardo Zenale and Bernardino Butinone, located at the right looking at the main altar. This absolute masterpiece has been created between the year 1485 and the years 1505. The dimensions are really impressive and monumental: 594x363cm, almost 6 meters per 4!

The polyptych is composed by 10 paintings, and the model for this masterpiece is probably the San Zeno Altarpiece, created by Andrea Mantegna for the San Zeno basilica in Verona between the years 1457 and 1459.





Details of this amazing, incredible masterpiece:













All pictures are mine.
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Old July 1st, 2016, 02:30 AM   #1259
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Madonna della Bozzola Sanctuary in Garlasco, near Pavia, some 34 kms south of the Duomo cathedral of Milan.

This sanctuary is known as "Madonna della Bozzola" because in lombard dialect "busslà" means hawthorne, so the name of this sanctuary in English
would be translated in something like "Our Lady of the Hawthorne".

The sanctuary is dedicated to remebember a miracle happened on September 1 of the year 1465.
During a storm, a young mute girl called Maria recovered under a small chapel with a fresco (the one now in the altar), here saw a light globe leaning on a hawthorne bush.

The Virgin Mary would have appeared and told to the young Maria to build a sanctuary above the thorn to protect all the surrounding area of Garlasco, Mortara and Vigevano, known as Lomellina. The girl was extremely surprised when, once arrived at Garlasco to tell the people the news, completely recovered her voice. She was no longer mute! Since then the sanctuary gained a lot of devotions, a sort of small Lourdes of the Lomellina.

The sanctuary has been built in different stages between 1565 and 1860. In the year 1600 the sanctuary was enlarged for the first time. In the year 1662 the bell tower was built. In the year 1720 the building of the octagonal dome begun. The definitive, greek cross plan of the sanctuary was achieved in the year 1860, when the main nave was extended and the equal-sized right and left transept were built. In that occasion, the interiors were completely redecorated in an elegant neo-Mannerist style. The facade that we see nowadays has been built in the year 1897-1905 by the engineer-architect Cesare Nava.

Ok, let's see the pictures!

Approaching the sanctuary, in a very rural and well preserved landscape:







The main facade:









The interiors:









The beautiful dome:



The main apse:



The main altar:



The fresco of the Virgin Mary, painted in the year 1456 from Agostino da Pavia. This is the fresco that the young mute girl Maria saw in the year 1465:



The left transept:



The barrel vault of the right transept:







The counter facade:



The view from right under the dome:





Detail of the decorations of the barrel vault:











In Garlasco there is also another important church, the main parish of the town, the Santa Maria Assunta church, built in late Baroque style from the year 1715 to the year 1783.



(Picture found on Wikimedia Commons, picture shot by Alessandro Vecchi)

The interiors:



The tall dome:



The dome and the counter facade:



The left transept:







The right transept:





All pictures without credits are mine.
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Last edited by tommolo; July 2nd, 2016 at 02:31 AM.
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Old July 1st, 2016, 02:42 AM   #1260
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The small but delicious neogothic church of San Marco in Trecella, near Pozzuolo Martesana, some 23 kms east of the Duomo cathedral of Milan, very close to Treviglio.
The church has been built in the year 1914 and the interior frescoes and decorations have been realized by the artist Rinaldo Casanova.

The exteriors:









The interiors:

























The left transept:



The right transept:



Other views of the beautiful exteriors:





The gothic apse:









All pictures are mine.
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Last edited by tommolo; July 1st, 2016 at 04:00 AM.
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