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Old September 29th, 2016, 11:33 AM   #681
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Zamosc











https://www.flickr.com/photos/poland...57658954023250
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Old September 29th, 2016, 11:51 AM   #682
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Lublin
















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Old September 29th, 2016, 03:36 PM   #683
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Originally Posted by RS_UK-PL View Post
Torun would've been nicer place if more Renaissance and Baroque architecture had been preserved (e.g. Jesuit Collegium, Marian Column and Artus Court)



http://www.turystyka.torun.pl/art/24...stniejacy.html
What happened to these buildings?
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Old September 29th, 2016, 04:27 PM   #684
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Jesuit Collegium - has been converted into a military barracks after the Second Partition of Poland (1793).



Artus Court - the original building was demolished in 1802 and replaced by a new construction.



Marian Column - demolished in 1817.



St. Nicholas Church - demolished in 1834.



http://www.turystyka.torun.pl/art/29...inikanski.html & http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...48&postcount=6
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Old September 29th, 2016, 06:19 PM   #685
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you obviously never saw Poland in the 80's and 90's.
...
and in 1945

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Old September 29th, 2016, 07:22 PM   #686
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and in 1800's

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Old September 29th, 2016, 08:22 PM   #687
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I don't consider Polish cities to be beautiful as a whole. most of each city's urban landscape looks like either some Soviet urban nightmare or WW2 ruins is really depressing. but it's rather disappointing that what you see on these forums are images of carefully selected areas rather than a general overview of each respective city.
So your response to previous posts is to carefully select the worst parts of Polish cities? I could make Paris or Vienna look like a hell hole if I wanted to.
Considering the last 200 years - of the most devastating and destructive history in Europe - exactly what were you expecting? Were you expecting a very rich country with many years of dense uninterupted squeeky clean development? A country enriched by many years of free trade and visiting business and investment? Did they teach history at your school? Maybe not - that's why you seem to be depressed? The default obvious answer to this thread is Krakow - however as I keep saying there can not be one answer because beauty can be found in every city. Every city has good and bad parts. I'm English but I think overall Polish cities are more beautiful than UK.
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Old September 30th, 2016, 02:45 PM   #688
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For example Kreutzigerstraße in Berlin - https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@52.51...7i13312!8i6656

"Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg is suffering from a surge in crime since early 2015, most notably around the former Reichsbahn ground (RAW) and the ASTRA club, resulting in the police advising on Facebook for nightly visitors of the area not to wear any jewellery."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friedr...zberg#Overview

Kotti - http://www.vice.com/en_uk/read/24-ho...tor-berlin-876

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Old September 30th, 2016, 11:37 PM   #689
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when I was in Berlin last, I saw the non-touristy areas and I must say with all due respect to the destruction Berlin saw, these areas were dirty and reminded me of some not so nice part of Istanbul in many ways. But of course I know there are many stunning parts too. The Unter den Linden was all under construction and covered in scaffolding. If this was my first time in Berlin, I would have a very negative impression. So this is the point we're making, it takes time to get to know some cities. Some cities we fall in love with from the start, like Paris or Florence or Krakow, others like Warsaw take time and can in the end be much more charming and engaging. I will be back in Berlin btw
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Warsaw Post-War Reconstruction to Present
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Old October 3rd, 2016, 12:58 PM   #690
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Kalisz














Tomb of Mieszko III the Old


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Old October 3rd, 2016, 05:11 PM   #691
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no one ever thinks of Kalisz as a great destination, but from what I see it is definitely worth a visit. It's history is certainly very interesting, hopefully something is left of this.
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Old October 3rd, 2016, 07:43 PM   #692
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Quote:
...
With the outbreak of World War I, the proximity of the border proved disastrous for Kalisz; it was one of the first cities destroyed in 1914. Between August 2 and August 22 Kalisz was shelled and then burned to the ground by German forces under Major Hermann Preusker, even though Russian troops had retreated from the city without defending it and German troops – many of them ethnic Poles – had initially been welcomed peaceably. Eight hundred men were arrested and then several of them slaughtered, while the city was set on fire and the remaining inhabitants were expelled. Out of roughly 68,000 citizens in 1914, only 5,000 remained in Kalisz a year later.
...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalisz



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Old October 4th, 2016, 01:53 AM   #693
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I think we have to distinguish the historic city cores from most of the residential areas. Preserved or rebuild city cores are as beautiful as in almost any other european country. But due to its demographic boost after 1945 and the extent of destruction, many residential areas especially in the big cities are really dull and dominated by commie blocks.
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Old October 6th, 2016, 06:37 PM   #694
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I think Lodz is the most fascinating place on Poland. It has no river - but this is not a minus. It evolved in the centre of Poland so people from all over could come and trade. Is has great old architecture and factorys which are all being renovated. David Lynch fell in love with Lodz and has a studio in the new 20 hectare centre which is now being developed. The 5 billion zl train station is only a fraction of what will happen. New roads - alleys - whole districts being renovated and converted. New residents are being attracted from all over Poland. A new rail trade link is also planned direct from Beijing China promising Lodz to be one of the richest cities in Europe. Buy your appartment now and make lots of money in 10 years. Lodz is also bidding for expo 2022. If it wins it will become known world wide
Hahahahaha nonsense

From Łodź who only can it escapes. Typical industrial city, which was created too quickly from a small village only for staff accommodation. After the collapse of the old-fashioned industry, and thus the lack of work in the city very quickly be depopulated.
In 1988 Łódź hit a record in its history the population of 854 003, a year later they toppled communism and the people began to flee from Łódź. At the end of 2015 in Łódź lived 700 982 persons. In 27 years the population of Łódź was reduced by 153 021 people. On average per year from the city wanes 5667 people.

Łódź despite recent investments in infrastructure road and rail will continue to depopulate because it is a town without a future and without a history.

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Old October 6th, 2016, 07:37 PM   #695
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I completely disagree with such defeatist thinking. I have been there twice, took friends from Ireland, Canada and the US and they were very impressed. It needs much more work but they will do it. So you are saying Manchester and Bilbao not to mention Detroit has and will revive but Lodz will not? Why do you say this? Lots of start-ups are moving into old factories. Rome was not built in a day, have patience and optimism and good things will come. The approach of negativism and escape is cowardly and self-destructive ultimately.
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Old October 6th, 2016, 08:05 PM   #696
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And to be honest, a population decline of 150.000 since 1990 in the case of Lodz is not really exceptional. From 1986 to the big incorporations in the late 90s, Leipzig schrunk from ~550.000 people to only 437.000 in 1998 (a loss of about 20% in less than 12 years, the peak were 718.000 in 1930 btw.) After the enlargements in 1999 it had 490.000 and today it has over 570.000 inhabitants while being among the fastest growing cities in Germany.
So I think Lodz has a good chance to recover. It's central position in nowadays Poland will sure be helpful. Especially when Cracow or Warsaw become too expensive and companies look for alternatives.
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Old October 6th, 2016, 09:26 PM   #697
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Lodz (exactly using pl letters Łódź) means boat, but this city has no river, no lake. Was the name given as something like joke, or there was other reason?



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Old October 7th, 2016, 07:22 PM   #698
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Łódź has a lot of them, just a small ones. See this:



Without rivers such explosion of textile industry wouldn't be possible.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Lower Silesia View Post
it is a town without a future and without a history.
If you don't know the history of Łódź, it doesn't mean it has none. Fortunetely nobody cares what you know. On the other hand you are spreading your incompetence and idiotic prejudices, so please, just stop.
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Old October 7th, 2016, 10:01 PM   #699
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Hahahahaha nonsense
Ok lets go through this. I say fascinating because Lodz has probably fhe largest potential/space for modern change and yet has the largest amount of pre-war architecture (appart from Krakow). Lodz has it all to come. The city is currently beginning a comlete renovation. Have you not heard about this? The government has restarted plans for a large airport between Lodz and Warsaw. The high speed rail link. It will soon be viable to live cheaper in Lodz and work in Warsaw. I know so many people from Spain Italy Portugal who live and work in Lodz. They have purchased property and will make money on that. They enjoy life in Lodz - and more are coming. This will cause a chain reaction. I am currently investing in property in Lodz. Yes people are leaving - but other people are replacing them. I have been to Lodz 9 times this year.

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Originally Posted by Lower Silesia View Post
Lodz despite recent investments in infrastructure road and rail will continue to depopulate because it is a town without a future and without a history.
You say without a future - completely blindly - based on nothing but your own bias.

Lodz has more history than most American cities. New York's grid road system was influenced by Lodz
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Old October 7th, 2016, 10:30 PM   #700
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Originally Posted by borubar7 View Post
Lodz (exactly using pl letters Łódź) means boat, but this city has no river, no lake. Was the name given as something like joke, or there was other reason?


From Wikipedia: https://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C5%81...A#Nazwa_miasta

No one has ever found certain explanation. There are few hypothesis:

- from noble surname "Łodzic"
- from old name "Wodzisław"
- from old name for Salix cinerea "łoza"
- from river "Łodka" (little boat), but probably it was the river that took name from the city
- from boat, but probably wrong, even though the city has 18 minor rivers and streams (nowadays underground) and they played a huge role during industrialisation, but there were too small for any kind of boats.

According to prof. Jan Miodek, a famous Polish linguist, geographical names (eg. mountains, rivers, cities) are the oldest names created by humans, and there is often very hard to track their origin. This is what he says about Łódź (http://vod.tvp.pl/24651013/lodz-i-lask). More or less, till XVII century the city was named "Łodzia" and there is no doubt it is from common word "łodz" (previously also "łodzia", old name for boat). Also from XVI century there is a boat in the emblem of Łódź. But we cannot explain why the city was assiociated with boats.
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