daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Photo Forums > Urban Showcase

Urban Showcase Show your selfmade photos



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old June 4th, 2012, 12:21 AM   #101
yubnub
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 830
Likes (Received): 448

Salisbury Cathedral is one of the most iconic and famous of all English cathedrals. Of particular note is that, unlike the majority of cathedrals featured in this thread, the cathedral in Salisbury was built almost entirely in a single style of gothic in a short peroid of time.

Salisbury's west front, the three huge lancet windows in the center are typical of Early English gothic architecture
image hosted on flickr

Salisbury Cathedral by barnyz, on Flickr

The famous spire is the tallest in the UK and is 123m high, not bad for something built 800 years ago
image hosted on flickr

Salisbury Cathedral by barnyz, on Flickr

The cathedral also contains a wonderful set of cloisters that are big enough to require their own buttresses
image hosted on flickr

Salisbury Cathedral by barnyz, on Flickr
yubnub no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old June 4th, 2012, 12:26 AM   #102
yubnub
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 830
Likes (Received): 448

Salisbury Cathedral is most famous for its iconic spire and exterior appearence but everyone who visits should make sure to go inside as it also has one of the finest interiors of any building in England

The nave is another lengthy example of Early English gothic. Unusally it does not contain an organ in the crossing so its one of the few cathedrals where you can easily see from one end to the other
image hosted on flickr

Salisbury Cathedral by barnyz, on Flickr

The cathedral is one of the more ornate of Early English cathedrals. As there is no easy access to real marble in England it is instead dressed with Purbeck Marble which is actually a limestone that is highly polished to look a little like marble
image hosted on flickr

Salisbury Cathedral by barnyz, on Flickr

Last edited by yubnub; June 4th, 2012 at 12:35 AM.
yubnub no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 4th, 2012, 12:31 AM   #103
yubnub
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 830
Likes (Received): 448

Salisbury, The Parish Church of St Thomas and St Edmunds

Salisbury has a few other gems to visit other than the cathedral such as the church of St Thomas and St Edmunds
image hosted on flickr

Salisbury church by barnyz, on Flickr

It is most known for a large medieval fresco above the crossing arch
image hosted on flickr

Salisbury church by barnyz, on Flickr
yubnub no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 4th, 2012, 12:54 AM   #104
openlyJane
Human Being
 
openlyJane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Liverpool
Posts: 31,633
Likes (Received): 43372

That is fabulous I don't think I've seen similar frescoes/ceiling painting in any other churches in England.
openlyJane no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 4th, 2012, 02:28 AM   #105
yubnub
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 830
Likes (Received): 448

Quote:
Originally Posted by openlyJane View Post
That is fabulous I don't think I've seen similar frescoes/ceiling painting in any other churches in England.
they are very rare (the only other one i can think of is in Coventry on the prevoius page). I think they must have been common at one point and then I assume destroyed during the reformation for being "too catholic" or something mad like that. TBH between reformations, dissolutions, wars and fires its a wonder that any medieval buildings survive at all (so glad they do, i can only imagine at what must have been lost over the years)
yubnub no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 4th, 2012, 11:49 AM   #106
openlyJane
Human Being
 
openlyJane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Liverpool
Posts: 31,633
Likes (Received): 43372

Quote:
Originally Posted by yubnub View Post
they are very rare (the only other one i can think of is in Coventry on the prevoius page). I think they must have been common at one point and then I assume destroyed during the reformation for being "too catholic" or something mad like that. TBH between reformations, dissolutions, wars and fires its a wonder that any medieval buildings survive at all (so glad they do, i can only imagine at what must have been lost over the years)
You would adore the Capella Palatina in Palermo ( Palatine Chapel) - my absolute favourite, albeit small, religious building - of those that I've seen. It is just exquisite - and has frescoes, gilding, wood carving, marble, tiling - every craft and art to the highest standard, uniting the best of Norman and Moorish design.
openlyJane no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 4th, 2012, 11:45 PM   #107
yubnub
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 830
Likes (Received): 448

Quote:
Originally Posted by openlyJane View Post
You would adore the Capella Palatina in Palermo ( Palatine Chapel) - my absolute favourite, albeit small, religious building - of those that I've seen. It is just exquisite - and has frescoes, gilding, wood carving, marble, tiling - every craft and art to the highest standard, uniting the best of Norman and Moorish design.
yep no doubt of that, Sicily is very high on my list of places i must go as soon as possible
yubnub no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 5th, 2012, 12:16 AM   #108
yubnub
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 830
Likes (Received): 448

Rochester Cathedral, this is one of the lesser known cathedral's but is one of the few next to a castle so worth the trip. Although a bit of a mixed bag it offers good examples of many styles of medieval architecture

Viewed from the castle you can clearly see the Perpendicular great west window sitting in front of a very Norman (Romanesque) nave which is attached to an Early English gothic crossing and transepts. A little of everything
image hosted on flickr

Rochester Cathedral by barnyz, on Flickr

Looking west from the crossing you can clearly see where the older Norman part is linked to the later gothic part
image hosted on flickr

Rochester Cathedral by barnyz, on Flickr

One of the transepts, very typically Early English with its large lancet windows
image hosted on flickr

Rochester Cathedral by barnyz, on Flickr
yubnub no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 5th, 2012, 12:58 AM   #109
Mossy22
Registered User
 
Mossy22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Liverpool & Durham
Posts: 359
Likes (Received): 42

Excellent Thread I've just been through the whole thing! Pitty you saw Durham on a rainy day, I was at the Cathedral today and the place was stunning in the sunshine. I also managed to get some interior shots when no-one was looking You should definitely visit again, but I will post the photos of the interior tomorrow on my durham thread below! Amazing shots of Salisbury btw.
__________________
My Photo Threads:

DURHAM - Through My Eyes http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...1#post75818611

LIVERPOOL - Through My Eyes http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1424462
Mossy22 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 6th, 2012, 01:05 AM   #110
yubnub
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 830
Likes (Received): 448

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mossy22 View Post
Excellent Thread I've just been through the whole thing! Pitty you saw Durham on a rainy day, I was at the Cathedral today and the place was stunning in the sunshine. I also managed to get some interior shots when no-one was looking You should definitely visit again, but I will post the photos of the interior tomorrow on my durham thread below! Amazing shots of Salisbury btw.
thanks Mossy22! Yes I definitly must visit Durham again (its one of those places I would want to visit many times). After looking through your wonderful thread I have a certain amount of location envy. Durham is just amazing!!!
yubnub no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 6th, 2012, 01:16 AM   #111
yubnub
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 830
Likes (Received): 448

Beverley Minster, probably the largest and finest non-cathedral church in England and in my opinion one of the finest pieces of architecture in the UK. It outshines all but a few of Englands cathedrals. It's not too far from York but is far more beautiful (if a little smaller). Words cant do it justice imo so...

The length of the building is evident viewed from across the fields. Unusually it does not have a central crossing tower but does have double transepts
image hosted on flickr

Beverley Minster by barnyz, on Flickr

The Perpendicular west front with its twin towers
image hosted on flickr

Beverley Minster by barnyz, on Flickr

The soaring nave is near perfect and I know Ive gushed alot so far over this building but honestly the first time I stepped inside it really left me speechless!
image hosted on flickr

Beverley Minster by barnyz, on Flickr

The chior is mostly Early English and dressed in Purbeck Marble. The picture does not do it justice, everyone shoud visit to see for themselves
image hosted on flickr

Beverley Minster by barnyz, on Flickr

Last edited by yubnub; June 6th, 2012 at 01:31 AM.
yubnub no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 6th, 2012, 01:25 AM   #112
yubnub
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 830
Likes (Received): 448

Beverley, St. Mary's Church. So the small town of Beverly has two of Englands finest churches! St. Mary's Church, although not in the same league as Beverly Minster should not be missed

This mostly Perpendicular exterior has unusually positioned flying buttresses propping up the ends of the transepts
image hosted on flickr

Beverley, St. Mary's Church by barnyz, on Flickr

The simpler interior is deceptively large (just look at the tiny man compared to the massive central crossing arch)
image hosted on flickr

Beverley, St. Mary's Church by barnyz, on Flickr
yubnub no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 6th, 2012, 05:13 AM   #113
tpe
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Chicago & NYC
Posts: 3,554
Likes (Received): 3071

Quote:
Originally Posted by yubnub View Post
Salisbury Cathedral is most famous for its iconic spire...
I had always wondered this: had the tower of Fonthill Abbey survived, would it have diminished or enhanced the effect of the cathedral spire?

It may sound counter-intuitive, but I suspect that it would have been the latter...

Great thread.
tpe no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 7th, 2012, 01:04 AM   #114
yubnub
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 830
Likes (Received): 448

Quote:
Originally Posted by tpe View Post
I had always wondered this: had the tower of Fonthill Abbey survived, would it have diminished or enhanced the effect of the cathedral spire?

It may sound counter-intuitive, but I suspect that it would have been the latter...

Great thread.
Possibly too far away although they would have been visible to each other from the tops. If it survived it would certainly have enhanced it I think, in fact its a real shame it didn't survive. There is Beckford Tower on a hill near Bath that has survived that certainly enhances the area it is in
yubnub no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 7th, 2012, 01:31 AM   #115
yubnub
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 830
Likes (Received): 448

Westminster Abbey, London's famous royal abbey and one of the largest medieval gothic buildings in the world. You are not allowed to take photos inside sadly and its really expensive to go in but most certainly worth it

The twin towers on the west front are newer having been designed by Hawksmoor and built in the 18th century. Victoria tower from the Palace of Westminster (aka the houses of parliment) is visible in the background. You can just about see the tiny church of St Margaret's on the left side being over shadowed and dwarfed by the abbey
image hosted on flickr

London Westminster Abbey by barnyz, on Flickr

Last edited by yubnub; June 7th, 2012 at 01:37 AM.
yubnub no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 7th, 2012, 01:34 AM   #116
yubnub
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 830
Likes (Received): 448

grr I cant find any of my photos from London's Southwark Cathedral which is odd as I lived near it for many years and must have gone in and taken photos on numerous occassions. Hopefully they will turn up somewhere so I will save this post in case I find them
yubnub no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 7th, 2012, 05:55 AM   #117
tpe
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Chicago & NYC
Posts: 3,554
Likes (Received): 3071

Quote:
Originally Posted by yubnub View Post
Possibly too far away although they would have been visible to each other from the tops. If it survived it would certainly have enhanced it I think, in fact its a real shame it didn't survive. There is Beckford Tower on a hill near Bath that has survived that certainly enhances the area it is in
Although much smaller in scale, Lansdown Tower is "integral" to Bath, as Beckford certainly envisioned it to be. And it is as much a testament to Beckford's ideas as Fonthill.

Fonthill was built with an eye towards the Cathedral Spire. And yet, in his later years, Beckford would reluctantly agree with Thomas Hope, in that a comparison between the two towers would put Fonthill at a disadvantage, in spite of it being better and more prominently situated.

Last edited by tpe; June 7th, 2012 at 06:02 AM.
tpe no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 7th, 2012, 10:40 AM   #118
aarhusforever
EU citizen
 
aarhusforever's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Aarhus/Europe
Posts: 7,078
Likes (Received): 9117

Thank you for the updates, yubnub
__________________
EUROPE - many states - one nation

Aarhus - the second largest city in Denmark

Aarhus...my Aarhus
aarhusforever no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 8th, 2012, 12:16 AM   #119
yubnub
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 830
Likes (Received): 448

Quote:
Originally Posted by tpe View Post
Although much smaller in scale, Lansdown Tower is "integral" to Bath, as Beckford certainly envisioned it to be. And it is as much a testament to Beckford's ideas as Fonthill.

Fonthill was built with an eye towards the Cathedral Spire. And yet, in his later years, Beckford would reluctantly agree with Thomas Hope, in that a comparison between the two towers would put Fonthill at a disadvantage, in spite of it being better and more prominently situated.
Well to be fair Salisbury puts almost every other building in the country to a disadvantage!!!
yubnub no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 8th, 2012, 12:17 AM   #120
yubnub
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 830
Likes (Received): 448

Quote:
Originally Posted by aarhusforever View Post
Thank you for the updates, yubnub
thanks aarhusforever, glad you like the thread
yubnub no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 06:33 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium