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Old June 16th, 2012, 05:07 PM   #141
yubnub
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the golden vision View Post
I'm really enjoying this thread, great work. What is it you find most interesting about the great cathedrals? I see them more as great feats of medieval engineering than places of beauty,although obviously some are incredibly beautiful, although I'd never describe the huge romanesque piers of some Norman cathedrals as beautiful added to that they grossly over-engineered. The gothic cathedrals however are masterpieces of engineering, though even here , I personally find them overpowering(haven't been to that many) and I suppose that's what they are meant to do isn't it.
Well I think you hit the nail on the head so to speak. I find the great gothic cathedrals to be an almost perfect expression of architecture in contrast to more modern architecture where recently there has been much theory about "form follows function", "the house is a machine for living in", "less is more" etc etc where always the functional aspect is deemed more important. In contrast gothic cathedrals seem to be the perfect synthesis between both form and function where all elements combine in a balanced way to produce something that is both art and struture where one cannot be easily seperated from the other. Norman cathedrals while not being as perfect still have many elements that combine perfectly but they also have a certain solidity about them as well that is awe inspiring considering how old some of them are.

With English cathedral's in particular I also enjoy the historic transistion of styles that are evident in some cathedrals where you can almost see the heavy romanesque elements gradually evolving over the ages into the lighter and more brittle looking gothic stone cages of later buildings.
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Old June 16th, 2012, 05:23 PM   #142
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Worcester Cathedral is another famous English cathedral that has elements from many different styles of medieval architecture

This is similar to the famous view of the cathedral from the £20 pound note with its perfect perpendicular crossing tower
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Worcester Cathedral by barnyz, on Flickr

Early English Gothic lancet windows
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Worcester Cathedral interior by barnyz, on Flickr

The nave is another lengthy English affair
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Worcester Cathedral interior by barnyz, on Flickr

Last edited by yubnub; June 16th, 2012 at 09:12 PM.
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Old June 16th, 2012, 11:46 PM   #143
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Originally Posted by yubnub View Post
Well I think you hit the nail on the head so to speak. I find the great gothic cathedrals to be an almost perfect expression of architecture in contrast to more modern architecture where recently there has been much theory about "form follows function", "the house is a machine for living in", "less is more" etc etc where always the functional aspect is deemed more important. In contrast gothic cathedrals seem to be the perfect synthesis between both form and function where all elements combine in a balanced way to produce something that is both art and struture where one cannot be easily seperated from the other. Norman cathedrals while not being as perfect still have many elements that combine perfectly but they also have a certain solidity about them as well that is awe inspiring considering how old some of them are.

With English cathedral's in particular I also enjoy the historic transistion of styles that are evident in some cathedrals where you can almost see the heavy romanesque elements gradually evolving over the ages into the lighter and more brittle looking gothic stone cages of later buildings.
Interesting, thanks. What I find fascinating is the replacement of one type of arch by another(pointed for sem-circular) led to a revolution in construction and form that transformed these building's interiors from masses of stone and gloom to space and light. Gothic
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Old June 29th, 2012, 04:15 PM   #144
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The Collegiate Church of St Mary in Warwick

A large and odd church with its pointed gothic windows surrounded by classical style detials
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Warwick Church of St Mary by barnyz, on Flickr

One of the many chapels inside
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Warwick Church of St Mary by barnyz, on Flickr
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Old July 14th, 2012, 04:18 PM   #145
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London, Southwark Cathedral. London's smaller and lesser known gothic cathedral. The building has undergone many drastic changes including the demolition and rebuilding of the nave in the 19th century. The bulk of the building was constucted in 1220 making it one of the first gothic buildings in London

The building sits in a very cramped site near London Bridge and its hard to get an overall view of the shape and style of the building. It's one of those places that tourists are likely to stumble on by mistake
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London, Southwark Cathedral by barnyz, on Flickr

It's many pinicles are now complemented by the latest pointy thing in London
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London, Southwark Cathedral by barnyz, on Flickr

The nave was rebuilt in the 19th century. There always seems to be an organ recital or chior session going on so if you have spare time in London then pop as unlike many other cathedral this one is still very active
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London, Southwark Cathedral by barnyz, on Flickr
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Old August 13th, 2014, 12:31 AM   #146
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Bump.....

Pictures: Birmingham Cathedral restoration experts get stunning views of city centre

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Aug 12, 2014 16:00 By Stacey Barnfield Birmingham Post

The weather vane is almost 200 feet above ground, giving workers unique views across Birmingham city centre

Restoration works to the highest part of Birmingham Cathedral have created rare views across the city centre.

A giant ‘cherry-picker’ crane on a special reinforced support is being used to give specialist workers access to the orb and weather vane for the work of re-gilding.

The weather vane is almost 200 feet above ground, giving workers unique views across Colmore Row and Birmingham city centre.

Dean of Birmingham Cathedral, the Very Revd Catherine Ogle, said: “We’re really looking forward to seeing this part of the restoration work.

“The re-gilding of the weather vane and orb is going to be a remarkable sight and well worth witnessing and documenting. When the re-gilded vane and orb are restored, the highest and crowning point of the Cathedral will be worthy, once again, of the Cathedral in the nation’s second city.”

The work has been highly visible throughout the Colmore Business District during August.

The main building was completed in 1715 but the tower, dome, orb, weather vane and cross were added in 1725.

In 1723 Sir Richard Gough, a landowner from the Calthorpe estate in Edgbaston persuaded then Prime Minister Sir Robert Walpole to make a donation of £600 from the King, George I.

In honour of Gough’s intervention, which is recorded on the plaque over the main entrance door, the weather vane was designed to incorporate a boar’s head, a reference to the Gough’s family crest. Nearly 300 years later the current works have been supported financially by Calthorpe Estates.
http://www.birminghampost.co.uk/news...xperts-7597366
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