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View Poll Results: Favorite CC Stadium
Maracanã Stadium - Rio de Janeiro 85 23.74%
Nacional Stadium - Brasília 108 30.17%
Castelao Stadium - Fortaleza 23 6.42%
Arena Pernambuco - Recife 81 22.63%
Arena Fonte Nova - Salvador 25 6.98%
Mineirao Stadium - Belo Horizonte 36 10.06%
Voters: 358. You may not vote on this poll

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Old June 17th, 2013, 08:38 PM   #421
GunnerJacket
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Almeria View Post
I think Brazil is pulling Lula's great work: Stadiums designed and mutilated (Maracaná) for the benefit of rich people in a country with a hobby so hot and humble as the Brazilian and organize an event like of a new rich they were (while social protests subside too violently as if to hide trash under the carpe).

You can organize an event without compromising their origins and the legacy not enjoy peoble that can to buy Vip boxes while you let the people sitting at 8 meters from the field on a newly remodeled stadium (paradoxically Gremio Arena is the prototype of a perfect stadium)
Are you saying that you'd prefer not to have any seats in the ends? No premium seating whatsoever? Or just that Brasil should've spent money on other things instead chasing the World Cup?
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Old June 17th, 2013, 08:47 PM   #422
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Old June 17th, 2013, 08:57 PM   #423
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image hosted on flickr


Why do they put the United Nations Flag there?! is it always like that? I've never noticed it before

Nice pictures!!
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Old June 17th, 2013, 09:49 PM   #424
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I don't know.
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Old June 17th, 2013, 09:49 PM   #425
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 5portsF4n View Post
I actually thought the crowd tried to get involved, but the game was just so boring. The stadium might have been cold at times because Spain bored everyone to death; Uruguay are also to blame for sitting back like they did. The booing at times was very audible especially when Spain just held the ball on the half way line. But even when Spain created chances the crowd got involved, so you cant fault them too much.
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Originally Posted by Almeria View Post
If Brazil play like Spain would call "jogo bonito", but as Spain is "boredom" (The final of Euro 2012 was borring..said the people..). Perhaps your concept of "fun game" is Brazil-Japan ....

The problem gambling in Spain ... is that it is Spain ... if Brazil ... would say that the selection of Brazil is much better than Pele team .. but we´re Spain ..

Last night the Spanish selection played a football 5 stars. If Xabi Hernandez and Iniesta were not Spanish they have 5 FIFA Ballon d`or.
Some look at the games to see the stadiums and FIFA organized nonsense and have no idea what is football and those who have envy us.


the Brazilian public applauded to Spain and booed by the repetitions of referee errors in the video scoreboard


Just to let you guys know, the booing had nothing to do with the game, was a local club "chanting fight"!

The game was indeed boring and that's why the "chanting fight" begun, because was nothing better to do!

About the "jogo bonito" discussion, this is a Brazilian definition of the game, it came from our desire to see great football moments, even if it doesn´t translate in a goal, that's one of the things we love in football, at least must of us. Doesn´t mean that everybody have to play this way and doesn´t mean this is the only thing beautiful about football but that´s what WE LIKE!

The Spanish way of playing can be good or even beautiful, even for some part of the Brazilian crowd but for the majority it´s incredible boring and if our Seleção would play like Spain it wouldn´t go without booing! You can see on the last three games Brazil played, if some defender touchs the ball to the goalkeeper and we are not wining, it´s booing all the way, no doubt about it!

So, what I´m trying to say is, we should play the way we like to play and Spain should play the way they like to play, and the way they become world champion, everyone with their one style!
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Old June 17th, 2013, 10:20 PM   #426
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Old June 18th, 2013, 12:58 AM   #427
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Nigeria defeat Tahiti by 6x1 this afternoon at Mineirão


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Old June 18th, 2013, 01:11 AM   #428
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Originally Posted by GunnerJacket View Post
Are you saying that you'd prefer not to have any seats in the ends? No premium seating whatsoever? Or just that Brasil should've spent money on other things instead chasing the World Cup?
I say I do not understand because it has remained in many Brazilian stadiums gaps between the playground and the stands.

All countries have the right to organize or invest in events, whenever they can afford it without having to raise taxes its citizens.

Although if I were President of Brazil, I remodeled Maracana when it had rebuilt one last favela in a neighborhood reside to decent people.

In my opinion the greatness of Maracanã resided in that could accommodate 100,000 brazilians "torcida", with remodeling have got two axes in each ring to make VIP boxes, losing all its charm.

Since planning an expensive event in a country of inequality...at least that the legacy is for the people: the Olympic village at a site that regenerate a favela (Barcelona 92... London 2012...), stands designed for people near the playing field, not to build a stadium in the Amazon by many solar panels you install... It is a paradox that Brazil is endeudes to raise taxes, but of course... "soccer is the bread of the people.
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Old June 18th, 2013, 06:27 AM   #430
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http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/18/wo...ties.html?_r=0

Thousands Gather for Protests in Brazil’s Largest Cities













Demonstrations in several cities grew in size and intensity after a harsh police crackdown last week stunned many citizens.

By SIMON ROMERO
Published: June 17, 2013

SÃO PAULO, Brazil — Protesters showed up by the thousands in Brazil’s largest cities on Monday night in a remarkable display of strength for an agitation that had begun with small protests against bus-fare increases, then evolved into a broader movement by groups and individuals irate over a range of issues including the country’s high cost of living and lavish new stadium projects.

The growing protests rank among the largest and most resonant since the nation’s military dictatorship ended in 1985, with demonstrators numbering into the tens of thousands gathered here in São Paulo, Brazil’s largest city, and other large protests unfolding in cities like Rio de Janeiro, Salvador, Curitiba, Belém and Brasília, the capital, where marchers made their way to the roof of Congress.

Sharing a parallel with the antigovernment protests in Turkey, the demonstrations in Brazil intensified after a harsh police crackdown last week stunned many citizens. In images shared widely on social media, the police here were seen beating unarmed protesters with batons and dispersing crowds by firing rubber bullets and tear gas into their midst.

“The violence has come from the government,” said Mariana Toledo, 27, a graduate student at the University of São Paulo who was among the protesters on Monday. “Such violent acts by the police instill fear, and at the same time the need to keep protesting.”

While the demonstration in São Paulo was not marred by the widespread repression that marked a protest here last week, riot police officers in Belo Horizonte dispersed protesters with pepper spray and tear gas. In Porto Alegre, in southern Brazil, police officers also used tear gas against protesters.

In Rio de Janeiro, where an independent estimate put the number of protesters around 100,000, televised images showed masked demonstrators trying to storm public buildings including the state legislature, a part of which was set on fire. In Brasilía, the police seemed to be caught off-guard by protesters who danced and chanted on the roof of Congress, a modernist building designed by the architect Oscar Niemeyer.

Such broad protests are relatively uncommon in Brazil, with some Brazilian political analysts describing what appeared to be a political culture more accepting of longstanding high levels of inequality and substandard public services than citizens in some neighboring countries in South America.

“The dangerous news announced on the streets, the novelty that the state tried to crush under the hooves of the horses of São Paulo’s police, is that at last we are alive,” the writer Eliane Brum said in an essay about the protests.

Brazil now seems to be pivoting toward a new phase of interaction between demonstrators and political leaders with its wave of protests, which crystallized this year in Porto Alegre. There, a group called the Free Fare Movement, which advocates lower public transportation fares, organized demonstrations against a hike in bus fares.

Similar protests emerged in May in Natal, a city in northeast Brazil, and this month in São Paulo, after the authorities raised bus fares by the equivalent of about 9 cents to 3.20 reais, about $1.47, prompting a wave of demonstrations that have grown in intensity.

While the hike came at a time of growing concern over inflation, which remains high even as economic growth has slowed considerably, the anger over the increase also reflects broader indignation over public transportation systems in São Paulo and in other large cities, which are plagued by inefficiency, overcrowding and crime.

“Today’s protests are the result of years and years of depending on chaotic and expensive transportation,” said Érica de Oliveira, 22, a student who was among the demonstrators.

A large number of protesters in São Paulo on Monday were university students, but middle-aged professionals and parents with children in strollers were also present. The scene seemed at once furious and festive. Some protesters had draped Brazilian flags over their shoulders; one held up a sign that read, “Brazil Colony, until when?”

While the protest in Brasília included strong criticism of congressional leaders, many placards here in São Paulo did not direct anger at Congress, at the federal government in Brasília or even at local authorities on the state or municipal level. Still, protesters in various cities focused on symbols of government power. Here in São Paulo, they marched to the governor’s palace; in Rio, to the state legislature; and in Brasília, to the Congress.

Fabio Malini, a scholar who analyzes data patterns in social media at the Federal University of Espírito Santo, said he was impressed by the movement’s refusal to be defined by a single objective and by its extensive use of social media, which has enabled it to evolve fast in response to various sources of social and political tension in Brazil.

One issue surging to the fore involves anger over stadium projects in various cities ahead of the 2014 World Cup, which Brazil is preparing to host. Some projects have been hindered by cost overruns and delays, the unfinished structures standing as testament to an injection of resources into sports arenas at a time when schools and public transit systems need upgrades.

“The largest protests are happening in cities which will host World Cup games,” Mr. Malini said. “Brazilians are mixing soccer and politics in a way that is new, and minority voices are making themselves heard.”

Paula Ramon contributed reporting from São Paulo, and Taylor Barnes from Rio de Janeiro.
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Old June 18th, 2013, 05:24 PM   #431
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Tahiti triumphant despite thumping Confed Cup defeat


A general view of Mineirao stadium


Nnamdi Oduamadi scores Nigeria’s second goal


Nigeria's players celebrate their Nnambi Oduamadi's goal


Jonathan Tehau scores Tahiti’s first goal during their Confederations Cup 2013


Jonathan Tehau celebrates with his team-mates

http://www.todayonline.com/photos/ga...fed-cup-defeat
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Old June 18th, 2013, 06:00 PM   #432
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Almeria View Post
I say I do not understand because it has remained in many Brazilian stadiums gaps between the playground and the stands.

All countries have the right to organize or invest in events, whenever they can afford it without having to raise taxes its citizens.

Although if I were President of Brazil, I remodeled Maracana when it had rebuilt one last favela in a neighborhood reside to decent people.

In my opinion the greatness of Maracanã resided in that could accommodate 100,000 brazilians "torcida", with remodeling have got two axes in each ring to make VIP boxes, losing all its charm.

Since planning an expensive event in a country of inequality...at least that the legacy is for the people: the Olympic village at a site that regenerate a favela (Barcelona 92... London 2012...), stands designed for people near the playing field, not to build a stadium in the Amazon by many solar panels you install... It is a paradox that Brazil is endeudes to raise taxes, but of course... "soccer is the bread of the people.
I think I understand what you're saying, and I certainly sympathize with the debates over how best to use government monies. Too often sporting events and stadiums are excuses to redirect contracts and favors to select people.

My stance regarding the resulting design of the structures, though, is where I think you and I differ in opinions. Brasil was not going to win the bid for the World Cup without stadiums that had full and proper accommodations for premium seating. No country would. So the moment Brasil pursued this vision it would be understood that the resulting venues, new and remodels alike, would feature modern amenities, box suites and so forth. Would you rather they have left Maracana intact and built something else just for the games? Of course not! So the option ultimately becomes a question of whether or not you wanted the World Cup in Brasil. If the answer is yes then the compromise to upgrade seating was part of the deal.

As to the proximity to the pitch I assume you're wishing the seats were closer, correct? In this regard I normally agree however I think that since some of these stadiums that have been remodeled were already so far removed from the sidelines that the only way to get closer would've required a complete rebuild. The results we're seeing are obviously intended to save money and provide a compromise and for the most part I'd say they do a good job. Imperfect but a substantial upgrade from before. The resulting venues may have lost some old world charm but should be distinctly safer, have better accommodations and amenities and are now ready for the new few generations.

So I can't speak as to whether or not Brasil should be spending money on other things or whether or not they're making the best use of funds for the stadiums, but based on what existed before and what they have now I think Brasil has a very nice crop of stadiums for their favored pastime.
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Old June 18th, 2013, 06:08 PM   #433
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Australia, Iran and South Korea are coming to Brazil.
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Old June 18th, 2013, 06:15 PM   #434
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Well .. as the game of Spain's ugly and boring ... and the Brazilian selection (Neymar* + 10 guys (* Neymar bla bla bla)) is beautiful ... Just brazil is licensed to play well .. and yes, the game of Spain is effective .. all waiting for the opponent back ... please, that dogmatic!

In the current Brazilian selection, would play only in Spanish Neymar and substitute, because Del Bosque does not like pure strikers ....

Brasil Much has to change to aspire to Brazil 2016.

The confederations will win Italy
And the World Cup 2016 Germany.
My prior comment is NOT a dispute between Brazil and Spain and whoever has the best players or is going to win the Cup.
I could not care less.
I am talking about a STYLE.
It doesn't matter if Brazil OR Spain do it, holding the ball and not moving forward is a boring and ugly game. Period.
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Old June 18th, 2013, 11:30 PM   #435
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Mineirão Stadium - Belo Horizonte

Nigeria 6 - 1 Tahiti

20,187 spectators


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Old June 19th, 2013, 12:50 AM   #436
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Old June 19th, 2013, 01:26 AM   #438
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Not saying that I don't understand the protests because they are justified, what I don't understand is why didn't they protest against it when they got the bid? Did they thought that the stadiums and infrastructure would build themselfs? Also, let's say Brasil wins the Cup in 2014, even in a final with Argentina. The people will not care about the poverty because they are world champions on home ground. Then in 2016 what will they do? Protest again, and again justified. Then let's say they will be in top 5 medal winners. They will forget the troubles and praise the achievement.
I mean seriously if you know you have poverty and unemployement issues, why take on such ambitious projects? Was it so hard and shamefull to refuse FIFA when they awarded the WC?
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Old June 19th, 2013, 01:32 AM   #439
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Someone is collecting the protests related to new democracy levels to FIFA and to governments, in Brazil and outside Brazil. Here is the result:

http://www.grunz.com.br/mapa-dos-pro...il-pelo-mundo/
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Old June 19th, 2013, 04:03 AM   #440
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Also, let's say Brasil wins the Cup in 2014, even in a final with Argentina. The people will not care about the poverty because they are world champions on home ground. Then in 2016 what will they do?















will do ... I'll tell you from experience ...
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Last edited by Almeria; June 19th, 2013 at 04:12 AM.
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