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Old July 19th, 2012, 04:52 AM   #21
600West218
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Ok, no one guessed it but those houses that now look like they are in the jungle are in Brooklyn, New York. They are actually part of the Brooklyn Navy Yard, which was another site I recently visited.

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The Navy Yard is in the background. Over the wall you can just make out the cranes in the ship yard.

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A mural on the wall of the Navy Yard.

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This is one of the old entrances to the Navy Yard which is now used by the New York Police Department. Notice the initials NYPD on the left? If you get your car towed by the police in Lower Manhattan there is a good chance this is where they will bring it.

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Ok, now we are at the Planet of the Apes looking place. These old homes, old mansions actually, are on Navy Yard property. They are called "Admirals Row" and they are where the top officers in charge of the Navy Yard lived. When this was a Navy Yard, from 1809 to the early 1960s it was an actual navy base.

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These houses were quite big as befits high ranking officers. I am told they were actually inhabited as late as the early 1970s. It is stunning that they would decay so fast and be overtaken by a virtual forest.

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Note the large bay window.

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You can hardly see the building here it is so overgrown.

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They actually do want to restore some of these but they are so far gone most, if not all, will simply have to be torn down.

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I had to walk further down Flatbush Avenue to get to the visitor entrance. It is a sizable complex. At its peak during the Second World War 70,000 people worked here.

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Note the sign that says "We used to launch ships. Now we launch businesses". After the Navy left in the 1960s it operated as a civilian ship yard up until the 1980s when it pretty much closed completely. It has since been built back up as a center for small and medium sized industrial firms and other places needing space. One of New Yorks largest movie production studios is actually located here.

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There is a good sized visitor center called Building 92. It has a decent sized museum which is fairly well done. But the highlight is to tour the grounds. You can't do that on your own. You have to go as part of a formal tour, which is what I did. Those will be the next pictures.
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Old July 20th, 2012, 06:17 AM   #22
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On the tour we went around and saw a number of the old buildings and dry docks in the Navy Yard:

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The paymaster building.

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Lots of the old cranes were there. This Navy Yard built some very famous ships, among them the Maine which sank in Havana Harbor and set off a war, the Arizona which was sunk at Pearl Harbor, and the Missouri which was the battleship that the Japanese signed the surrender papers on in Tokyo harbor. Interesting that the ships that began and concluded US involvement in WW2 were from this shipyard.

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Here we come a dry dock. Originally ships were constructed in these dry docks but not they are only repaired there. This tug was being worked on as we watched. You can see the old crane works and was in use.

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This large building is actually much bigger than what appears in the picture. It is U shaped and it is where they built the ship engines. It is in quite a precarious state and although it looks fascinating you cannot go inside.

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That is the Williamsburg Bridge in the distance. During WW2 the bridge was completely covered in fabric, as was the Manhattan Bridge, to prevent people from spying on the Navy Yard from the bridges.

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This is the huge engine construction building. As you can see, just a shell remains.

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This was an interesting building. The bottom part is a massive, windowless structure. To date, it has never been said by the Navy what was done in that part of the building. On the top were the administrative and executive offices of the Navy Yard. So whatever was done in the bottom part I guess it couldn't have been too dangerous.

Note the B&H Photo sign. They have their mail order operations here. So if you bought something over the internet from B&H this is where it came from.

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This is one of the parts still used as a shipyard.

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Old July 20th, 2012, 06:32 AM   #23
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Fascinating stuff. Did you get to Buffalo? I passed through once and it look really interesting in a post-industrial rust-belt kind of way?
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Old July 20th, 2012, 03:35 PM   #24
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You travel to other countries for old industrial area's and canals but you have so much to explore in your own state! Great pictures and what a nice area to explore. The Semi abandonned feeling always gets me warm
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Old July 20th, 2012, 04:14 PM   #25
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I like the 3rd pic from the bottom - it looks like the two cranes are battling it out. "Who are you calling creaky, you rustbucket?"
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Old July 20th, 2012, 04:16 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by streetlegal View Post
Fascinating stuff. Did you get to Buffalo? I passed through once and it look really interesting in a post-industrial rust-belt kind of way?
Yup. I grew up 60 miles from Buffalo and have family there. I'll definitely be showing some pictures from there.
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Old July 20th, 2012, 04:18 PM   #27
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I know I am repeating myself, but this really is an amazing thread.
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Old July 20th, 2012, 04:19 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joshsam View Post
You travel to other countries for old industrial area's and canals but you have so much to explore in your own state! Great pictures and what a nice area to explore. The Semi abandonned feeling always gets me warm
That is the irony, we often don't explore as much where we live as we should. Note all the Belgians who haven't been to Charleroi or the French who haven't been to Lille. And lets not even get started about Londoners who seem not to have made it north of Cambridge Here in New York City it is taken as a sign of being a "real" New Yorker that you have never been to the Statue of Liberty.

I have gotten around New York a good deal and am doing even more now so there will be plenty to show here hopefully.
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Old July 20th, 2012, 08:56 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 600West218 View Post
That is the irony, we often don't explore as much where we live as we should. Note all the Belgians who haven't been to Charleroi or the French who haven't been to Lille. And lets not even get started about Londoners who seem not to have made it north of Cambridge Here in New York City it is taken as a sign of being a "real" New Yorker that you have never been to the Statue of Liberty.

I have gotten around New York a good deal and am doing even more now so there will be plenty to show here hopefully.
Well, Charleroi has a very bad reputation here. Most people would only go their if they would get paid . But I know what you mean. Lots of Europeans are making trips around the world, while there is so much to see and to do in their own country and continent. It's strange.
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Old July 21st, 2012, 01:34 AM   #30
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The next part of the tour took us to the old military hospital that was part of the Navy Yard.

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This is the military hospital. It was built in 1811, right before the War of 1812.

Its claim to fame is that a military physician named E.R. Squibb worked here. He was disenchanted with the very poor and irregular quality of medicines used in the U.S. military and spent his time at this hospital developing methods and making consistently high quality medications. He later formed his own company and he is the "Squibb" in Bristoy Myers-Squibb.

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Ok, this is a total crap picture because they have unfortunately allowed vegetation to overtake this sign. It is actually marking a military cemetery.

Before it was a Naval Yard this area was a significant bay called Wallabout Bay (the name comes from the Walloons from Belgium who were the first people to settle in the area). During the American revolution when the British controlled New York City they had old war ships beached here which they used to hold American prisoners. The most famous one was the HMS Jersey. The conditions were horrible and about 10,000 prisoners died and they were sometimes simply thrown overboard or sometimes taken ashore and buried in the beach.

Over the years as the Wallabout Bay was dug up and changed to expand the naval yard bones have been found. They were collected and moved to this area. In the 1970s when the Yard was to be closed they were dug up and moved to another cemetery. However, they have since discovered that there are a lot more bodies here that were never moved and so they are supposed to be restoring it as a military cemetery.

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This is the home of the Chief Surgeon at the hospital

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A better shot of the hospital. It supposedly has a nice interior and they are hoping to restore it enough that people can go inside.

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An abandoned monument to the Opium War - something completely forgotten in the U.S.

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Back down in the main part of the Yard again.

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Back by some massive warehouses/factory buildings.

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After the tour I spent more time in the Building 92 museum.

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This notes that the first angled deck on a carrier was built here. It also gives one part of the reason the ship yard was closed - NYC made it illegal for ships with nuclear reactors to enter New York harbor.

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This neat mural over a timeline shows the more famous ships that were built here.

BTW, the Monitor, which was the famous ironclad ship built by the Union in the Civil War was built at another ship yard in Greenpoint Brooklyn but it was brought to the Navy Yard to be fitted with its turret and gun.

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At the end you see an oil tanker which was the last major ship they built here.

And that is the end of my visit to the Brooklyn Navy Yard.
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Old July 21st, 2012, 05:15 AM   #31
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The next place to visit is where this strange flag flies, if anyone can guess it:

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Old July 21st, 2012, 10:59 AM   #32
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Is that when the United States decided that each new State added to the Union would be represented by a new star and a new stripe? Hence 15 stars and 15 stripes on this flag. It makes sense as 50 red and white stripes today would just look pink from afar.
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Old July 22nd, 2012, 01:46 AM   #33
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Yes, this is from when they added stripes for states as well as stars, then they reverted to just stars and the stripes would get a little out of control.

It flies over a fort on Governors Island in New York harbor.
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Old July 22nd, 2012, 02:04 AM   #34
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The next trip is to Governors Island which is the fairly large island in New York harbor, between the tip of southern Manhattan and Brooklyn.

It used to be a military base, then a Coast Guard base. When that all closed it laid empty for a while but is now open to the public as a park.

The ferry trip to get there is free and leaves from the old Staten Island ferry terminal right next to the new Staten Island ferry terminal.

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The new terminal is on the left.

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The ride over is very short, maybe 4 or 5 minutes. The white tower is a ventilation shaft for the Brooklyn-Battery automobile tunnel.

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As you can see you aren't far from Manhattan.

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The old flag flies over Fort Jay which was built between 1794 and 1807 as part of the defenses of New York harbor.

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That lousy building poking up in the background ruins the view of the historic fort :-(

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The fort is open to the public and you can go inside.

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I wonder if those canons could hit the world trade center from there?

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As you can see, they once had lots of canons in the fort, and they had railings to allow them to maneuver easily.

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The main entrance being renovated.

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Before exploring the rest of the island I decided to stop and the beachside grill to get some food.

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You do get a nice view of the Staten Island Ferry going back and forth from there. Also, you can see both ferry terminals in this picture.
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Old July 22nd, 2012, 07:54 PM   #35
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Very interesting!
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Old July 23rd, 2012, 03:09 PM   #36
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Why did they need to build a new ferry terminal? The old one still seems perfectly adequate.

I like the fort by the way.
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Old July 23rd, 2012, 03:12 PM   #37
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Probably because ferry traffic became to big to handle for the old terminal...

Nice new set of pictures! I've seen pictures of te fort before. It's great such place survived aal the renewal that N-American cities do, altough ,not in the greatest conditions.
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Old July 23rd, 2012, 05:47 PM   #38
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The fort seems in good condition to me - obviously a lot of the cannons have since gone but that's to be expected.
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Old July 23rd, 2012, 07:43 PM   #39
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Yes, the fort is in good condition. The buildings inside of it have been used for housing and upgraded throughout the year.

However, this is only one of two forts on the island. The next one I'll show is much more interesting :-)
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Old July 23rd, 2012, 07:52 PM   #40
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Interesting and very nice presentation from these districts of NYC
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