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Old July 24th, 2012, 06:30 AM   #41
600West218
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After lunch I headed a bit south the the other fort - Fort Williams:

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This for was completed in 1811 just before the War of 1812 began. It was part of a huge interlocking set of forts meant to defend New York

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This is a map of New York harbor showing how they had forts that covered thoroughly the harbor and prevented any opposing force to enter. New York was very, very heavily defended.

Note that where the statue of Liberty is was a fort. So the star shaped structure you see it standing on in areal pictures isn't decorative, it is an old fort that the statue was place on top of.


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As it turned out, New York was much more heavily defended than Washington DC. So the capital was burned to the ground while New York wasn't touched.

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Inside the fort.

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Once artillery got better and the fort became obsolete militarily it was converted into a military prison.

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The view from on top the fort.

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These have bars on them from the time it was a prison but they would have been open and had cannons posing through them when it was a fort.

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This is very interesting - these are new blocks of Sandstone which is what the fort is made of and also what New York's ubiquitous "Brownstones" are made of. They used it in the fort because sandstone actually gives a little bit which means cannon balls would bounce off it without damaging it whereas a stronger rock might shatter from such a blow.

Interestingly, this rock doesn't come from New York - it is quarried around Newark, New Jersey.

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I then started walking south along the shore of the island.

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Walking south you go past what used to be the residential area of the island and is now abandoned.

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This note about Ellis Island told me something I never know. Upper class immigrants riding in 1st or 2nd class could go straight into the US and never had to go through Ellis Island. Only the "lower class" passengers in steerage had to pass inspection in the Island.

So the US being very discriminatory in favor of those who have money is nothing new!

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Lots of abandoned buildings here.

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The southern tip of the island had a biergarten and some interesting modern art sculptures.

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This notes that after the completion of the Erie canal New York boomed and by 1840 handled more cargo than all other US cities combined!

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Walking up the eastern side of the island you see some of the now little used cargo facilities in Brooklyn.

The yellow water taxi goes between Manhattan and a popular IKEA store in Red Hook Brooklyn.

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Apparently the water between Governors Island and Brooklyn is called Buttermilk Channel. Never heard that before. They also may have driven cows across it back in the day.

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Wow, a nice sand beach in New York harbor. How cool would it be to swim there! (and it was tempting as it was extremely hot).

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An old chapel.

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This is where they stored ammunition.

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An old hospital.

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Officers homes.

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Heading back to the bigger island of Manhattan.

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First cars got off the ferry, then pedestrians.

Thus ended my little excursion to Governor's Island.
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Old July 24th, 2012, 04:00 PM   #42
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The map of New York's fortifications is interesting - regarding the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty, it appears obvious that it used to be a fort but it had never occurred to me until now.

This reminds me a bit of a fort that I visited in 1999 when I was on a college exchange in Castine, Maine, called Fort George and originally built by the British. It was a lot less well preserved than these ones (essentially all that was left were the earthen ramparts). Also there was a baseball diamond within it, which I found a bit odd for something that is quite historic. It can be seen in Google Earth in fact.
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Old July 25th, 2012, 06:01 AM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piltup Man View Post

This reminds me a bit of a fort that I visited in 1999 when I was on a college exchange in Castine, Maine, called Fort George and originally built by the British.
Was that in Maine or in Upstate New York? There is a Ft. George in upstate New York on the south end of Lake George.
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Old July 25th, 2012, 06:32 AM   #44
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100_5304 by 600West218, on Flickr

The next little trip is to Amsterdam New York, a small city about 30 miles west of Albany, sort of in the center of New York State.

It was a city with lots of mills in it, particularly mills for making carpets.

The fate of this small industrial city makes quite a contrast with some of the old industrial places I have seen in Europe.

It is a small enough city that you can easily walk all around it which is what I did. It starts off with the part up on a hill and the city itself is on the slope that goes down from the hill to the river/canal valley below.

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Up on the hill you have places that look like typical American suburbs, fairly prosperous and very orderly.

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There were even some pretty good size old "mansions" on top.

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Then as you start to walk down into the valley the homes get a bit older, and more "working class".

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All this difference you see in homes happened in a very short distance, not more than 4 or 5 blocks.

As you continue on it really goes down hill, both literally and figuratively.

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Again, this is all on the same street, within a distance of not more than 2/3 of a kilometer at most.

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BTW, there were a fair amount of brick buildings and homes in Amsterdam. That shows the city is pretty old by US standards as not many single family homes continued to be made with brick in the US in the 20th century.

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This is some public housing for senior citizens.

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There are some older structures that are still in decent shape. I think this was a funeral home.

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There was definitely some money here...

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Well, it's not quite Liverpool....


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From here on out most things are either completely abandoned or very dilapidated. Note the fluorescent auction sign. They were all over the place, maybe on half the buildings. One person was surprised to see someone walking around taking pictures and he asked me if I wanted to buy his house.

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Here we see one of the old factory buildings. More than likely, this would have been a carpet factory. Textiles was a major industry in this part of New York State. But in the 1950s most of them moved to the southern United States where labor was cheaper and there weren't (aren't) any unions.

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This is more or less in the center of the city. You can't see it directly but there is a small creak running through that area. The water power from that creak is what led to the development of Amsterdam in the first place.

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More abandoned factories. In the foreground is a completely empty parking lot, even though this was the middle of the week. No workers, no cars.

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This little museum, which was created by a local mill owner, also was closed.

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This is now walking into the commercial center of the city. Note the Puerto Rican flag. Hispanic immigrants came to work in the mills but then were stuck as the mills closed.

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This is the main street which consists mainly of empty store fronts.

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A pretty interesting, and old, building.

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Apparently in the 1970s they attempted to revitalize city by building a shopping mall in the center of it - sort of like the ones Liverpool and Manchester have in their centers.

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As you can see, there is essentially nothing and no one in it. I think there were three or four functioning storefronts in it: a travel agency, a government job training center, and a medical office.

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However, it wasn't a complete waste. There was run woman jogging around in circles. Apparently she realized that with no one else in it it made a good indoor track.

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In the next post we'll see some more of Amsterdam's industrial past and why things like that mall are so desolate.
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Old July 25th, 2012, 06:39 AM   #45
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Oh, and I forgot to mention, but do you notice anything funny about that photo set?


That's right, there isn't one single solitary person in all of those pictures. Not one. And this was in the afternoon of a normal weekday, I certainly wasn't avoiding taking pictures with people in them, and I didn't choose these pictures because they don't have people in them. It just so happens that they don't.... because there were virtually no people to be seen there.

Note, you see a few cars driving around - so there are people there, but no one walking on the streets and certainly no cafes or coffee shops. When you are used to this places like New York City or almost any place in Europe seem to have stunning vibrancy.

As best as I can tell this results from an extreme car culture and economic decline.
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Old July 25th, 2012, 01:34 PM   #46
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Yes, the absence of any people in those pictures struck me before I even read your comment. It's also a shame that some of the buildings with the most interesting architecture are in some cases also the most dilapidated.

By the way, the Fort George I was referring to previously is indeed in Maine, although unlike the forts you showed it is not worth a special visit unless you happen to be in the area.
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Old July 25th, 2012, 03:11 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 600West218 View Post
Was that in Maine or in Upstate New York? There is a Ft. George in upstate New York on the south end of Lake George.
I believe that you're thinking of Fort William Henry, which played a role in the French and Indian War, which was the American theatre for the Seven Years War.
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Old July 25th, 2012, 03:20 PM   #48
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Quote:
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I believe that you're thinking of Fort William Henry, which played a role in the French and Indian War, which was the American theatre for the Seven Years War.
You are absolutely correct. Thanks for the correction
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Old July 25th, 2012, 06:35 PM   #49
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It is bewildering to see such total abandonment. Even at it's worst period, Liverpool still had a lot of 'people' activity.
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Old July 26th, 2012, 01:50 AM   #50
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This town could be such a jewel....What waste! I get the shivers when I think about the fact that there are countless such places in the US. Don't people feel anything to revive those old homes at all?

Indeed there are just no people on the street. Even in the little town I live there are always people on the street especially in the central area you'll never be alone, ever, not even at 4PM at night.

Anyway it gives great scenes. And it great pictures WEST!
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Old July 26th, 2012, 02:07 AM   #51
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You are absolutely correct. Thanks for the correction
My pleasure, amigo.
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Old July 26th, 2012, 03:17 AM   #52
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Generally in the United States when things get bad people tend to move away. The above is one such example. Its main industry tanked and there was little hope for a replacement so most got up and left.
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Old July 26th, 2012, 03:48 AM   #53
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It is bewildering to see such total abandonment. Even at it's worst period, Liverpool still had a lot of 'people' activity.
I am sure this is bewildering to you. Just as walking out of the Lime Street Station into the throngs in Liverpool was amazing for me (and of course, very, very nice.).
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Old July 26th, 2012, 03:00 PM   #54
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They could so just rebuild those old homes and make appartments in it for social housing. At least then things look a bit more a live...That's how a lot of abandonned buildings in town centers here have been put back to use...

In my town there where 14 dilepetated row homes next to eachother. They kept the historical front (workers houses of a factory build in 1803), restored it, and rebuild the back into a social housing block:

This is how it looked 3 years ago just afther the work finished:
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an here how they looked before: they where so rotten they started to fall down)

http://s2.hbvl.be/imgpath/assets_img..._7_235x280.jpg
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Old July 26th, 2012, 04:06 PM   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joshsam View Post
They could so just rebuild those old homes and make appartments in it for social housing. At least then things look a bit more a live...That's how a lot of abandonned buildings in town centers here have been put back to use...

In my town there where 14 dilepetated row homes next to eachother. They kept the historical front (workers houses of a factory build in 1803), restored it, and rebuild the back into a social housing block:

This is how it looked 3 years ago just afther the work finished:
http://i975.photobucket.com/albums/a...N/P6030200.jpg

an here how they looked before: they where so rotten they started to fall down)

http://s2.hbvl.be/imgpath/assets_img..._7_235x280.jpg
Wow, that is a very impressive job they did. But it wouldn't work here - there are no jobs and no reason for people to live here. As Oakridge said, people have moved on to greener pastures where there are jobs (or at least nicer weather). The US has enough space that it can abandon entire metro areas. Sadly, these tend to be the areas with very nice and intersting history.
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Old July 27th, 2012, 06:07 AM   #56
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Leaving the depressingly abandoned indoor mall I continued heading east on main street. Unfortunately, the level of abandonment only got worse.

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Note again the auction signs.

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This was an abandoned diner.

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I suppose someone is living where that satellite dish is. But it is hard to imagine how they survive the very cold winters in this area in such a dilapidated structure.

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One interesting architectural feature is you see what appear to be hybrid brick/wood structures. I am thinking the structures were built in brick but many years later when they wanted to add something they did it with wood.

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As you can see, mother nature is starting to reclaim parts of this city. It is interesting to see how quickly nature reclaims any man made structure that isn't actively maintained. Think back to those old homes in the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

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An up-close of the auction sign on a boarded up house.

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Hah, well, a bit of Liverpool has creeped in here with the brightly colored door!!

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Down this street you can see another massive factory. One thing that was interesting is that the housing didn't seem to match the factories. That is, there were LOTS of huge factory buildings and not all that many homes. Where did all the workers live I have to wonder?

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This building and sign you actually see from the main highway the runs the length of New York State. I have passed it many, many times and always thought all these old industrial buildings looked very interesting but I never stopped. This time I did.

As fate would have it, there was actually a worker there loading something into a truck. I approached to speak to him and he said it was a glove factory that was just now closing down. He pretty upset, not wanting to talk, and waved me off.

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I walked around the complex a bit. Here I was heading around towards what looked to be some old power generating part of it.

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Again, nature reclaims rapidly.

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Even though it was a small city these industrial areas were quite big.

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I'll continue this in the next post. But note yet again... no people around at all.
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Old July 27th, 2012, 06:55 AM   #57
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The pictures confirm that there ain't nothing quite as intriguing as the recent past . . . the past that is dying in front of our very eyes. I felt this sense of a vanished world, of factories, their factory-clock rhythms, and workers communes, when I visited Milwaukee some years ago.

With so much of historic and interest, I find it sooo depressing that American TV-land reflects none of this--leastwise, mainstream channels. Nary a single program about history or social culture, nothing to stem the flow of crap 1950's game shows celeb-TV and formulaic cop dramas.

Anyway, very cool thread!
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Old July 27th, 2012, 07:04 AM   #58
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I have noticed that the US has some amazing industrial heritage. These semi-abandoned towns, like many I saw in the mid-west, also have an incredible housing stock, sadly left to rot. Still, if you want to buy a cheap house . . .

In fact, I was offered a job once in Fredonia NY--would have been a hell of a lot cheaper than San Fran!! But also mind-numbing for a foreigner, I suspect . . .
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Old July 27th, 2012, 11:48 AM   #59
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It looks like a ghost town... quite eerie in fact.
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Old July 27th, 2012, 03:35 PM   #60
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Wow, that just.....how they come let thiw town so far. yet it gives great exploring opportunities... It almost makes me sad though looking at those nice homes.

I wonder...this town is only 30miles form the Albany-Troy metro area, both towns still having a nice historical center with buildings maintained and in a good shape. Why can't this just be a commuter town of that metro area? because on GE you can see recently build suburbs around... I just don't get why people would abandon such town when it's so close to a metro area.

Also, there are giant strip malls on the edge of the town. Why? Even the suburbs are in walking distance of the town center. Such a waste.


EDIT: The city of troy should be an example. Althoug you can still see a lot of parking lost where once buildings used to be. The houses look nicely kept and the historical buildings aren't abandonned.
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