daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Photo Forums > Urban Showcase

Urban Showcase Show your selfmade photos



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old July 27th, 2012, 11:56 PM   #61
600West218
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 2,733
Likes (Received): 1574

Quote:
Originally Posted by streetlegal View Post
The pictures confirm that there ain't nothing quite as intriguing as the recent past . . . the past that is dying in front of our very eyes. I felt this sense of a vanished world, of factories, their factory-clock rhythms, and workers communes, when I visited Milwaukee some years ago.
Very true! The recent past is so intrigueing - it certainly sucks me in. You can almost, but not quite, touch it. You can relate to it... but not completely. It feels like its your history, yet you weren't there for it.

So yes, on a lot of levels recent history is intrigueing.
600West218 no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old July 27th, 2012, 11:59 PM   #62
600West218
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 2,733
Likes (Received): 1574

Quote:
Originally Posted by streetlegal View Post
I have noticed that the US has some amazing industrial heritage. These semi-abandoned towns, like many I saw in the mid-west, also have an incredible housing stock, sadly left to rot. Still, if you want to buy a cheap house . . .
Yup, in lots of places in Upstate New York buying a house is cheaper than buying a car. In Buffalo you can buy a huge house, maybe 4,000 square feet, for $5,000.


In fact, I was offered a job once in Fredonia NY--would have been a hell of a lo
Quote:
Originally Posted by streetlegal View Post
t cheaper than San Fran!! But also mind-numbing for a foreigner, I suspect . . .
That must have been a tough choice, San Fran versus Fredonia.
But you are right, with a decent paying job in Fredonia you would be rich.
600West218 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 28th, 2012, 12:10 AM   #63
600West218
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 2,733
Likes (Received): 1574

Quote:
Originally Posted by joshsam View Post
Wow, that just.....how they come let thiw town so far. yet it gives great exploring opportunities... It almost makes me sad though looking at those nice homes.

I wonder...this town is only 30miles form the Albany-Troy metro area, both towns still having a nice historical center with buildings maintained and in a good shape. Why can't this just be a commuter town of that metro area? because on GE you can see recently build suburbs around... I just don't get why people would abandon such town when it's so close to a metro area.
Yes, it is close to being part of that area. There are busses that leave Amsterdam in the morning to take people to work in the government offices in Albany. I suspect that is the main reason this place isn't completely dead.

Albany, is in good shape because of all the government jobs. Troy has Renssalier Polythenic Institute which is very big (and very good) and that probably stabalizes its economy. Schennectady, which is the other main part of that metro area (it is actually Albany-Schennectady - Troy metro area) has some universities, still some General Electric factories but also some abandoned areas. Plus the State government puts offices in both Troy and Schennectady to help prop them up. I have pictures of Schennectady and when I walked around its downtown the biggest building, and the only new one, was the New York State Lottery.


Quote:
Originally Posted by joshsam View Post
Also, there are giant strip malls on the edge of the town. Why? Even the suburbs are in walking distance of the town center. Such a waste.
Yes, this is common. Cities are left to rot while the suburbs expand. A big part of this is racial - the white population does not want to be around blacks and hispanics. Another part is the car culture where people want to drive everywhere easily and that means you have to have lots of parking, which city centers don't usually have.

That is the normal pattern in the US - a poor and in decline city proper, prosperous suburbs, and in general a pretty sterile atmosphere. Very few cities break this pattern - New York, San Fran, Miami, DC, Boston and to a limited extent Chicago. Most every other city follows that pattern.

What is worse about these Upstate cities is that not just the city proper is in decline but the entire metro region is generally in decline. Go to the suburbs of Buffalo or Syracuse and you'll see abandoned houses and shopping malls.
600West218 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 28th, 2012, 12:22 AM   #64
joshsam
JR
 
joshsam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Sint-Truiden
Posts: 7,165
Likes (Received): 5408

Thanks a lot for the info. So the Albany-Schennectady - Troy metro area is in better shape because of all the gouvernment jobs. At least that's one metro area saved... I thought Detroit was one of the baddest places. But afther seeing these immages and hear your story, I'm not sure if it really is.

Chicagogeorge a forumer on this forum allready posted several maps of the Chicago metro area with the movement of people. And it show a rapid decline in number of people living in the ity propper.

Well I hope these places will change for the better and new suburbs are halted.
__________________
Ceci n'est pas un pays, een bananenrepubliek ja!
joshsam no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 28th, 2012, 07:25 AM   #65
600West218
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 2,733
Likes (Received): 1574

I didn't go any further in to that abandoned complex and although it was very tempting to try I didn't dare try to go in any of the buildings. If anyone wants to see a bit of what some of these buildings look like you can see these photos someone put on Flikr ( http://www.flickr.com/photos/altuwa/...th/4842362773/ )

Instead I walked back out to a residential street and headed for some other interesting stuff.

image hosted on flickr

100_5371 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_5375 by 600West218, on Flickr

Probably real cheap if anyone wants it.

image hosted on flickr

100_5376 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_5380 by 600West218, on Flickr

This tower looks really interesting but I'm not sure what it was used for.

image hosted on flickr

100_5385 by 600West218, on Flickr

At the base it was broken open and people have obviously gone in it, but it was dark and isolated and who knows what dangers lurked inside such as stairs that would give way. Plus I was by myself. So I decided I better take a pass on this.

image hosted on flickr

100_5386 by 600West218, on Flickr

I then started walking back towards the center of the city, taking different streets this time.

image hosted on flickr

100_5387 by 600West218, on Flickr

Again, total abandonment and no one to be seen.

image hosted on flickr

100_5389 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_5391 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_5394 by 600West218, on Flickr

Obviously this city had some money at one point to build a rather stately library.

image hosted on flickr

100_5396 by 600West218, on Flickr

These were some really cool buildings that I think any city would be happy to have.

image hosted on flickr

100_5398 by 600West218, on Flickr

This is the small river that runs down the hill that Amsterdam is on and into the larger Mohawk River. This water power is what got Amsterdam its start.

image hosted on flickr

100_5399 by 600West218, on Flickr

The most famous resident (well, past resident) of Amsterdam, Kirk Douglas. Now, if he could get his son to bring Catherine Zeta-Jones around the place could pick up a little :-)

image hosted on flickr

100_5402 by 600West218, on Flickr

Looking back up to another industrial area further up on the hill. It is really quite amazing how many old factories this place has. I would say in the area I explored there were a good dozen old factory complexes and then the city extends to the other side of the Mohawk river and I saw a good number of factories there too when I took a quick drive over there (no pictures though). There will still be a good bit more exploring to do the next time I go back.

image hosted on flickr

100_5403 by 600West218, on Flickr

As I'm heading uphill things get better and the houses start being fairly decent and kept up.

image hosted on flickr

100_5404 by 600West218, on Flickr

This factory was built right over the river, probably for waterpower.

image hosted on flickr

100_5405 by 600West218, on Flickr

City Hall.

image hosted on flickr

100_5406 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_5407 by 600West218, on Flickr

This used to be the mansion of one of the main industrialists in Amsterdam. He donated it to the city.

image hosted on flickr

100_5408 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_5409 by 600West218, on Flickr

In back of the city hall there was a little garden area.

image hosted on flickr

100_5411 by 600West218, on Flickr

Inside the city hall that had a display case with some of the local industrial products. Note the Fownes Gloves. That was the factory I went by that was just in the process of being shut down.

image hosted on flickr

100_5412 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_5416 by 600West218, on Flickr

More factories.

image hosted on flickr

100_5418 by 600West218, on Flickr

Some of these up in this part of the city were still being used.

image hosted on flickr

100_5420 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_5423 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_5426 by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

100_5429 by 600West218, on Flickr

The little river making its way down into the valley that I had been exploring.

That is it for Amsterdam. Definitely a place I hope to get back to for more exploration. Great heritage but sadly emblematic of what has happened to Upstate New York.
600West218 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 28th, 2012, 10:44 AM   #66
streetlegal
Registered User
 
streetlegal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: San Francisco/Bristol
Posts: 845
Likes (Received): 250

Amazing stuff. A kind of "Anti-Disneyland"--just more fascinating. Please find out what that tower was for!!

When I was a kid, there were smelting towers I used to snuggle into, but this looks like something different???
streetlegal no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 28th, 2012, 10:50 AM   #67
streetlegal
Registered User
 
streetlegal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: San Francisco/Bristol
Posts: 845
Likes (Received): 250

Excuse my ignorance, but what were "Mendets"? Were they kind of instant fixes for broken pots etc?

And what was the lumber connection (sorry if I missed this)?
streetlegal no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 28th, 2012, 10:58 AM   #68
streetlegal
Registered User
 
streetlegal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: San Francisco/Bristol
Posts: 845
Likes (Received): 250

Last point: have you ever thought of putting a book together of USA's abandoned industries--so many fascinating buildings and stories worth recording before they vanish.
streetlegal no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 28th, 2012, 11:50 AM   #69
joshsam
JR
 
joshsam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Sint-Truiden
Posts: 7,165
Likes (Received): 5408

This thread is great! How can such a small city can have so much industry! I guess it must have been a rich city back in the days... I also like the river somehow

Great pictures.
__________________
Ceci n'est pas un pays, een bananenrepubliek ja!
joshsam no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 28th, 2012, 01:59 PM   #70
Puinkabouter
killed Laura Palmer
 
Puinkabouter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: G(h)ent
Posts: 10,407
Likes (Received): 2320

Looks like a really beautiful town with a lot of very pretty architectural and industrial heritage. Except for that Sanford Mansion, that's just a horrific mishmash of styles. But those huge abandoned factory buildings are beautiful

There used to be a couple of old factories of that scale in my hometown too (which you visited), but they were torn down and only the smaller ones remain, but most of those got repurposed as museums, apartments, shopping centers, artists' workshops, and so on. This town has lots of infrastructure that offers a great potential, especially as it is pretty close to a sizable metro area, apparently...
__________________
www.dewebsitevanpuinkabouter.be
Puinkabouter está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old July 28th, 2012, 02:06 PM   #71
vitaniya
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 46
Likes (Received): 3

Really amazing!
vitaniya no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 29th, 2012, 12:31 AM   #72
600West218
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 2,733
Likes (Received): 1574

Quote:
Originally Posted by streetlegal View Post
Amazing stuff. A kind of "Anti-Disneyland"--just more fascinating. Please find out what that tower was for!!

When I was a kid, there were smelting towers I used to snuggle into, but this looks like something different???
I will look it up. I think I found out about it before on the internet, that it was some old mill. But I'm not sure what roll the tower played.

Edit: Here we go, it was part of the Mohawk Carpet Mill:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/windy_valley/2682269127/

The company still exists but it is in Georgia. Most all of this industry moved to the southern United States to get cheaper, non-union labor.

Last edited by 600West218; July 29th, 2012 at 12:40 AM.
600West218 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 29th, 2012, 12:35 AM   #73
600West218
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 2,733
Likes (Received): 1574

Quote:
Originally Posted by streetlegal View Post
Excuse my ignorance, but what were "Mendets"? Were they kind of instant fixes for broken pots etc?

And what was the lumber connection (sorry if I missed this)?
Not sure what menders are - I never heard of them before. It looks almost like a sowing kit but then the woman seems to be holding a pot.

The lumber industry here would not be surprising. Just north of this city is a huge forested area called the Adirondacks. It is actually about the size of Belgium and it is just forests with some rivers and lakes. They used to cut a lot of trees for lumber and to make paper. In fact, there is still some paper industry in other cites around here.

There already are a number of books on abandoned industry in the US. There are a couple on Detroit alone.
600West218 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 29th, 2012, 12:37 AM   #74
600West218
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 2,733
Likes (Received): 1574

Quote:
Originally Posted by Puinkabouter View Post
Looks like a really beautiful town with a lot of very pretty architectural and industrial heritage. Except for that Sanford Mansion, that's just a horrific mishmash of styles. But those huge abandoned factory buildings are beautiful

There used to be a couple of old factories of that scale in my hometown too (which you visited), but they were torn down and only the smaller ones remain, but most of those got repurposed as museums, apartments, shopping centers, artists' workshops, and so on. This town has lots of infrastructure that offers a great potential, especially as it is pretty close to a sizable metro area, apparently...
Yeah, and I've seen factories put to good use in other places. In England some were made into small shopping and dining centers. In Charleroi they had the big artist studios and club in the steel mill. It would be great if they could do that here but the problem is that the area isn't that populated and it is relatively low income with a lot of unemployment and many people moving to other parts of the U.S.
600West218 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 29th, 2012, 08:25 PM   #75
600West218
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 2,733
Likes (Received): 1574

Next up will be this place:

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr
600West218 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 29th, 2012, 10:09 PM   #76
joshsam
JR
 
joshsam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Sint-Truiden
Posts: 7,165
Likes (Received): 5408

That's a really nice sign! i wich our old factories has such nice signs overhere.

The only neon lit sign on a factory I now close to me is that of the RECOR factory in Hasselt and it looks like shit compaired to this amazing sign.
__________________
Ceci n'est pas un pays, een bananenrepubliek ja!
joshsam no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 30th, 2012, 04:39 AM   #77
600West218
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 2,733
Likes (Received): 1574

Quote:
Originally Posted by joshsam View Post
That's a really nice sign! i wich our old factories has such nice signs overhere.

The only neon lit sign on a factory I now close to me is that of the RECOR factory in Hasselt and it looks like shit compaired to this amazing sign.
Actually, it never dawned on me that it was a neon sign. I've only ever seen it during daylight.

But you are right, it is a neon sign:

http://youtu.be/_-rzm1DdunM

Edit: BTW, how do you embed video in SC?

Last edited by 600West218; July 30th, 2012 at 04:51 AM.
600West218 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 30th, 2012, 02:21 PM   #78
joshsam
JR
 
joshsam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Sint-Truiden
Posts: 7,165
Likes (Received): 5408

like this but without the *

[*youtube] part of URL behind= [/youtube]

So in your case you place _-rzm1DdunM&feature in between.

This is the result:

__________________
Ceci n'est pas un pays, een bananenrepubliek ja!
joshsam no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 31st, 2012, 04:22 AM   #79
DaveF12
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Denman
Posts: 516
Likes (Received): 246

it's really sad to see some cities/towns look like this.
thank you fro showing these photos.
DaveF12 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 31st, 2012, 05:09 AM   #80
600West218
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 2,733
Likes (Received): 1574

Given how depressing the last place explored was this time I'll post on a place that is in significantly better shape, even if it has its own problems. It is Schenectady, New York and is about 20 miles east of Amsterdam New York. It is part of the Albany - Schenectady - Troy metro area.

Some of these pictures I took with an iPhone, some with a regular camera so the quality of pictures will vary.

I started in the downtown of Schenectady:

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

Look - a person on the street!! You can probably already note that while Schenectady's downtown in nothing to brag about it is better off than Amsterdam.

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

There are some small, but obviously used, office buildings. It turns out that most of them are government buildings but still it is better than complete abandonment.

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

There were a few hints of interesting buildings but in general I found this area to be pretty drab.

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

The Procter Theater is from the 1920s and is quite luxurious (though unfortunately I couldn't get any good shots of the interior). It is actually on the National Register of Historic Places.

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

The little arcade and box office were the least interesting part of the interior. The actual theater was quite ornate with spectacular chandaliers but it was too dark to get pictures.

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

Interesting bay windows.

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

The City Hall was pretty nice.

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

The General Electric Company and Schenectady are very much linked, at least historically. We'll see more of that later.

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

I never knew this before but Schenectady is quite old and was founded by the Dutch. Doesn't sound like a Dutch name but what do I know....

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

This little lane that went between the City Hall and the main part of downtown was nice.

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

Their was a huge locomotive manufacturing company here.

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

There were a bunch of Civil War monuments here, something you'll find in virtually all Upstate New York villages, towns and cities.

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

Healthcare and insurance companies are one of the few remaining businesses in Upstate. While most of industry has left an older population has stayed behind along with the hospitals and insurance companies that cater to them.

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

Nice to see some renovated buildings here. But again, note there is no cafe culture here. I think we've seen one person so far.

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

This is the largest office building in the downtown area and I found it rather pathetic for a city with a big industrial and corporate heritage that it is the headquarters of the New York State Lottery.

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

I imagine the State politicians put it here to try to prop up the city and win votes.

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

I wonder what all the working class and poor people in New York City who spend their money on Lottery tickets would think if they saw this.

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by 600West218, on Flickr

This marker is where an old train station used to be. There is nothing there now but a parking lot. But Edison's arrival here is what put Schenectady on the map as we'll see in the next installment.
600West218 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
new york

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 10:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium