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Old April 1st, 2016, 10:12 PM   #2081
Depeched
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I just visited very interesting and beauty area between Geldop (Geldapė) and Lenkupie (Lenkupis). Not all know that this area also was part of Minor Lithuania in East Prussia.
Most of toponyms still exist Lithuanian. I was shocked how many old cemeteries are destroyed in these areas. It is hard to find even surnames or names. Seems that was main idea to remove all real local people names from graves. For example in Lithuania, Memelland you can still find most of cemeteries with crosses and names (exept Memel). What was done in Poland and why? It is done by new locals?
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>> MY PHOTO THREAD ABOUT LITHUANIA
>>MY PHOTOS FROM KLAIPĖDA (MEMEL)
>>> OLD LITHUANIA



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Old April 2nd, 2016, 03:42 AM   #2082
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Depeched
area between Geldop (Geldapė) and Lenkupie (Lenkupis). Not all know that this area also was part of Minor Lithuania in East Prussia.
Not all know this, becuse it was not part of Minor Lithuania. Goldap region was the borderland between Masuria and Minor Lithuania. However, it was Germanized relatively early on (already mostly Germanized before the mid-19th century, if we believe official census data at least).

I have the following official Prussian data from year 1825, apparently 1) and 2) from two different months:

Kreis Goldapp:

1) By language (Sprache/Muttersprache):

German-speakers - 17,412
Polish-speakers - 3,940
Lithuanian-speakers - 3,559

2) By religion (Konfession):

Protestants - 24,980
Catholics - 323
Jews - 25


Of course the vast majority of Lithuanian-speakers in East Prussian Lithuania Minor were Protestants.

Unlike Lithuanian-speakers in Lithuania Proper, who were (and still are) overwhelmingly Roman Catholics.

=====================================

It is possible that the data from 1825 was falsified and shows a higher % of German-speakers than in reality.

This German map from 1847 shows Goldap as the borderland between Polish and Lithuanian inhabited areas:



This map showing the linguistic situation in the late 1500s also shows Goldap at the Polish-Lithuanian border:



Pruska Litwa = Prussian Lithuania, while 1 + 2 + 3 = the extent of ethnically Polish settlement in East Prussia:



This map shows Goldap also on the borderland between Polish (Masovian) and Lithuanian settlement areas:



On the other hand, this map shows the area as ethnically mixed Polish-Lithuanian region in the 1500s-1600s:



This map shows the southern boundary of sermons in Lithuanian language in year 1719 also close to Goldap:

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Old April 2nd, 2016, 01:20 PM   #2083
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WW1 monument in Dunajek/Duneyken (16 km from Goldap)

Quote:
R. Dyck
R. Dombrowski
F. Gillandt
F. Schülz
F. Horn
A. Jeschull
G. Jeschull
G. Kullack
G. Kornatz
G. Podlasly
E. Stemmer
O. Stemmer
F. Skirlo
O. Skirlo
A. Skirlo
O. Trotzwitz
WW1 monument in Boćwinka/Bodschwingken (17 km from Goldap)

Quote:
Hermann Fronzeck
Rudolf Fronzeck
Hugo Kunkel
Oskar Gronau
Emil Meyhofer
Hermann Przykopanski
Karl Salewski
Hermann Salewski
Eduard Moritz
Heinrich Moritz
Rudolf Fronzeck
Fritz Wensack
August Plettner
Karl Plikat
Fritz Pletzer
Emil Pichot
Franz Bonalus
August Jeworowski
Gustav Hempel
Franz Burba
WW1 cemetery in Żabin/Groß Szabienen (22 km east of Goldap)



Quote:
Ltn. d. Res. Methner, 6. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Fähnr. Willy Stoffregen, 6. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Vzf. d. Res. Friedrich Puttkammer, 4. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Vzf. d. Res. Kurt Mathiak, 5. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Uffz. d. Res. Zitzke [Zietzke], 2. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Uffz. Emil Ewers, 3. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Uffz. d. Res. Konrad Losekamm, 4. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Uffz. Agathon Nowak [Nowack], 5. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Uffz. Hermann Fiedler, 4. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Uffz. Kasanowski, Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Uffz. d. Res. Paul Salewski, 9. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Uffz. Max Birr [Dirr], 8. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Uffz. d. Res. Max Ruhnke, 10. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Uffz. Schulte, Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Uffz. Schulz, Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Uffz. Lieboldt [Sieboldt], Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Uffz. Hildebrandt, Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Uffz. Alfred Adomeit, 9. Komp. Gren. Rgt. 5, † 11.9.1914
Uffz. Otto Wilhelm, 9. Komp. Gren. Rgt. 5, † 11.9.1914
Uffz. Friedrich Nitsch, 11. Komp. Gren. Rgt. 5, † 11.9.1914
Gefr. Liese, Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Gefr. d. Res. Heinrich Pekruhn, 1. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Gefr. Friedrichs, Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Gefr. Arthur Kasper [Casper], 5. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Gefr. d. Res. Fliege, 2. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Gefr. d. Res. Adolf Lamparski [Lamperski], 3. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Gefr. d. Res. Paul Klatt, 4. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Gefr. Thurn, Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Gefr. Käuffer [Käufer], Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Gefr. Peter Dzeminski [Dzminski], 12. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Wehrm. Felix Lewandowski, 6. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Musk. Friedrich Karl August Röske [Roeske], 8. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Musk. Liedtke, Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Musk. Leo Niemc [Niems], 5. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Musk. Poschmann, Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Musk. Heinrich Reckefuß [Reckefusz], 8. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Musk. Fricke, Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Musk. Friedrich Carstens, 9. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Musk. Wulff, Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Musk. Höckendorff [Höckendorf], Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Musk. Oberberg [Overberg], Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Musk. Nikolaus Wehrs, 12. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Musk. Müller, Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Musk. Overbeck, Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Musk. Josef Lesner, 3. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Musk. Otto Reiff, 4. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Musk. Christian Rudebeck, 4. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Musk. Karl Lörke [Loerke], 5. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Musk. Heuer, Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Musk. Czierson [Chirrson], 8. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Fritz Zemke, 10. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Paul Kornath [Kopnath], 9. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Arthur Domninck [Domnick], 9. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Jensen, 2. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Steinmar [Steiner], Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Friedrich Tiggemann, 1. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Peters, Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Rahn [Rahe], Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Karth, Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. J. Lewandowski, 11. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Felix Lewandowski, 9. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Schütz, Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Reinke, Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Koschnitzki, Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Lützow, Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Konstantin Kania, 4. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Josef Zalesky [Zaleski], 4. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Dosch [Dorsch], Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Kwidzinski [Kwiedzinski], Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Max Vorrath, 5. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Johann Nowienski [Nowinski], 6. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Leo Kunkel, 6. Komp. Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Büchler [Büchner], Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Raulien, Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Bartelick [Bartulök], Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Meyer, Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Weiker, Inf. Rgt. 128, † 11.9.1914
Res. Rydlychowski [Rydlochowski], Gren. Rgt. 5, † 11.9.1914
Res. Wilhelm Winkler, 11. Komp. Gren. Rgt. 5, † 11.9.1914
Res. Lipski [Sipski], Gren. Rgt. 5, † 11.9.1914
Res. Bruno Sträwe [Straewe], 11. Komp. Gren. Rgt. 5, † 11.9.1914
Res. Czarga, Gren. Rgt. 5, † 11.9.1914
Füs. Johann Braun, 9. Komp. Gren. Rgt. 5, † 11.9.1914
Füs. Otto Parpat [Parpart], 9. Komp. Gren. Rgt. 5, † 11.9.1914
Füs. Bannasch, Gren. Rgt. 5, † 11.9.1914
Füs. Walter Engel, 9. Komp. Gren. Rgt. 5, † 11.9.1914
Füs. Josef Omnieszynski [Omniczynski], 9. Komp. Gren. Rgt. 5, † 11.9.1914
Füs. August Loewenau, 9. Komp. Gren. Rgt. 5, † 11.9.1914
Kan. Wilhelm Fischer, 1. Batt. Felda. Rgt. 36, † 11.9.1914
Hus. Otto Ziemer, 4. Esk. Hus. Rgt. 5, † 13.9.1914
WW1 monument in Dubeninki/Dubeningken (17 km east of Goldap)

Quote:
+AUXKALLEN+
FRITZ HOFFMANN
RICH. MISSUN

+BLINDGALLEN+
FRITZ HALBHUBNER
GUST. HAGEMEISTER
AUG. HÖHST
K. THIENAT
K. KAHNWALD
FR. MISSUN
FR. LEITNER
FRZ. PLETTNER
O. MERLECKER
FRZ. MERLECKER

+BUDWEITSCHEN+
HERRM. BRAKNIES
FRZ. GRÖLL
RUD. GERHARDT
ER. WOLFF
FRZ. GRAU
FRZ. NITSCHKOWSKI
O. KAULMEGIES
AUG. STAGINSKI
K. JAKELSKI
FR. LENGKEIT
HERRM. SUCK
AUG. SCHESKAT
AUG. NOWAK
AUG. SCHWEDAS
JUL. NOWAK
EMIL SEIDLER
FR. SITTER

+CATHARINENHOF+
GUST. LESZINSKI

+CZARNEN+
FR. GEHRING
FR. BOSSY
MATH. BOSSY
AD. BOSSY
K. GANS
GUST. GUTTKUHN
GUST. KLIMASCHEWSKI
ED. MÜLLER
GOTTL. ROPPEL
FR. KLIMASCHEWSKI
JOH. SYPERRECK
MART. SYPERRECK
GUST. SCHULER

+DUBENINGKEN+
PAUL PFAU
MAX PFAU
LUD. HASSENSTEIN
LUD. TODTENHÖFER
FR. THALHÄUSER
GUST. SCHMIDT
K. SCHARF
MAX SCHARF
ED. KIDEHS
LEOP. KRÜGER
FRZ. ROMMEREIT
D. JANELLO
MART. AUDMEIT
HERRM. HEINRICH
FR. NAASNER
CHR. STANGEL
FRZ. MYDENOWITZ
FR. GONSCHOROWSKI
JOH. RAUF
FELIX DRYL
GEORG NELL
WILL. KADRITZKI
EMIL STURM

+ESZERGALLEN+
JOH. KINGEREIT
K. NIKOLAI
ARTH. NEUMANN
FRZ. LANGE
FRZ. GRATSCH
REINH. ZANDER
AD. JANKOWSKI
FR. NIEDERSTRASSER

+GR. BLUDSZEN+
FR. HUFENRACH
AUG. ZOHNER
AUG. SCHMIDT
FRZ. WALLIES
FR. JANELLO

+LANGENSEE+
RICH. DZEWAS
FRZ. WELLER

+LINAWEN+
O. NEUMEYER
FR. KARIUS
HERRM. KALINKA
K. TISCHHÄUSER
FRZ. ESPNMANN
J. ENDRICHKEIT

+LOYEN+
J. JUDDAT
ER. USCHKOREIT
K. GEHRHOFF
EM. SKOBINNA
GUST. MLETZKOWSKI
K. WEBAT
AUG. PILLESCHEWSKI
EM. STEIN
GUST. TOMAT
JOH. KOWALEWSKI
FRZ. KOWALEWSKI
EW. BUDNIK
FR. SCHERWINSKI

+MATZNORKEHMEN+
ADOLF. LITZNER
ERNST. MATZULAT
AUG. JAGCZENT
GUST. LAUPICHLER
FR. KRIESZIO
FRZ. KRIESZIO

+MESCHKRUPCHEN+
P. WOLFF
CHR. WOLFF
EM. WASCHULEWSKI
P. BAJOHR
FR. CZERWONN
AUG. HEIN
FR. SCHUKAT
FR. GRAU
GUST. PFEIFER
EM. TRILLING
J. SZOGAS
WILH. SULLUS
FRZ. MÜLLER
FR. WALLIES

+MARLINOWEN+
GUST. STEIN
FR. PASZOSKA
WALT. KUCZINSKI
LUIS. SENDTKO
GST. MORDAS
WILH. MORDAS
LH. SZODRUCH
MATH. SYPERRECK
JOH. SYPERRECK
GUST. KLIMMACH
MRT. WROBLEWSKI
K. WROBLEWSKI

+PADINGKEHMEN+
FR. SCHMIDT
GUST. BROSCH
WILH. BIRNBACHER
AUG. BROSCH
AUG. KRAFT
O. THIEL
O. WILLIES
JOH. WASCHULEWSKI

+PLAUTZKEHMEN+
WILH. SCHÄFER
RUD. GÖRKE
K. SZUR
K. GRIBAS
FR. GERHARDT
FRZ. GERHARDT
HERRM. SZESZELSKI
GUST. BOMBLIES
FR. SEBELIES
ERNST. MATULL
FR. PFEIFFER
WILH. PFEIFFER
AUG. ROPPEL
FR. ROPPEL
FRZ. BEISTER

+PRÄROSZLEHNEN+
FR. MISSUN
ALB. DAGRAT
K. AUGUSTAT

+ROGAINEN+
AUG. DANSCHEWITZ
D. KLIMASCHEWSKI
AUG. STAGINSKI
EM. UMARO
ART. DZEWAS
GUST. DÖRR
FR. REICH
FR. SCHINKEWITZ
FR. DÖRR
FRZ. STEGNOTAT
W. KRAUSE
FR. STEGNOTAT
WA. PIEZARKA
FR. DISCHEREIT
FRZ. STAGINSKI
FR. SAISCHEWSKI
FRZ. SCHINKEWITZ

+ROMINTEN+
AD. POERSCHAT
HEINR. HUFENBAUM
FR. SCHLICKER
HERRM. ALBUSCHKAT
HANS. OBERSTELLER
SAM. WEIDE
FR. OBERSTELLER
FR. SCHAFER
AD. WEIDE
K. HUFENBACH
FR. GAUDA
HANS MAI
D. WILNAT
HERRM. KALWEIT
GUST. ALBRECHT

+SUMOWEN+
D. KLIMACH
HANS. SZODRUCH
GUST. SZODRUCH
WILH. SCHULINSKI

+SZABOJEDEN+
AUG. KARIUS
GUST. KARIUS
LUD. HOLL
AUG. KALLWEIT
GUST. KALLWEIT
FR. JAKAT
D. SZEBROWSKI
K. RILLOX
FR. HOLL

+STAATSHAUSEN+
FRZ. MILESCHEWSKI
O. BUTTSCHEREIT
FR. KALINKA
JOS. ROHDE
FR. HOLL
K. MISSUN
ERNST KARALUS
JUL. SZOGAS

+THEWELKEHMEN+
FRZ. WALLENKOWITZ
D. DIDCZUN
FRZ. MILLUKS
FR. MILLUKS
GUST. PÄTSCH
FRZ. WOLLF
FR. MOBBEL
FRZ. DADRAT

+UPIDAMISCHKEN+
FR. WASCHKEWITZ
FR. GLANERT
JOH. GONSIOROWSKI
GEORG. KISELEWSKI

WILH. HALBHUBNER = PRÄROSZLEHNEN
GOTTL. ARENDT, HERRM. KALINKA = DUBENINGKEN
ANT. DANGELEIT = "
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Old April 3rd, 2016, 01:28 AM   #2084
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Depeched View Post
I just visited very interesting and beauty area between Geldop (Geldapė) and Lenkupie (Lenkupis). Not all know that this area also was part of Minor Lithuania in East Prussia.
Most of toponyms still exist Lithuanian. I was shocked how many old cemeteries are destroyed in these areas.
"Are destroyed" is supposed to mean: "Were destroyed" or "Are being destroyed"?

If first, it happened across the area, sadly not only in Gołdap county. I'd bet that over 30% of necropolia in East Prussia vanished somewhen between 1945 and 1975.

If second case, call the police immediately. After so many monuments destroyed, conservation authorities are quite vigilant especially in the cases of wanton vandalism.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Depeched View Post
It is hard to find even surnames or names. Seems that was main idea to remove all real local people names from graves. For example in Lithuania, Memelland you can still find most of cemeteries with crosses and names (exept Memel).
Probably Lithuanians from "Lithuania proper" got used to the area of Memelland before the war and didn't treat the area as completely alien after the war. Similar situation was in Poland, Działdowo County (the only area of East Prussia transferred to PL in 1920). It looks much more, how to put it, historically intact, than surrounding areas which were transferred to PL in 1945.

The other possible reason is that easternmost part of the East Prussia (Polish part) was particularly destroyed during the war (and, in contrast to some other parts of the region, actually there were serious fight around, for example Gołdap was three times took over by the Red Army and three times regained by Wehrmacht). As the result the area is barely populated. Gołdap county have some ghost-villages which were wiped from the face of the earth and never rebuild. Good for żubry (European bisons), bad for monuments.

More to the west, at least there are some people to take care of graveyards where searching for the roots became popular.

Area with large number of autochtons, especially south Warmia has cementeries intact.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Depeched View Post
Most of toponyms still exist Lithuanian.
MEH. Probably over 80% of toponyms in East Prussia in general is Prussian, so for layman Nearly-Lithuanian
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Old April 3rd, 2016, 12:09 PM   #2085
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New houses in Warmia by Pantel Studio









Source: http://pantel.olsztyn.pl/portfolio_k...dla-na-warmii/
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Old April 3rd, 2016, 02:52 PM   #2086
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Mikolajki's oldest resident Malgorzata Faron celebrates 100th birthday (Lutheran Church in Mikolajki/Nikolaiken, Masuria)



Source: http://www.luteranie.pl/nowosci/niez...kach,3616.html

Just a few months ago, 103 years old Bronislawa Gejda from Stare Czajki/Alt Czayken (Masuria) passed away: http://ro.com.pl/nie-zyje-najstarsza...mazur/01243528
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Old April 3rd, 2016, 04:06 PM   #2087
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Reconstructed statue of Madonna and Child (Malbork/Marienburg)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bartosz_44 View Post
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Old April 3rd, 2016, 06:28 PM   #2088
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I remember I was there a few years ago. Schloss Marienburg is really BIG. After 3h sightseeing with guide I was exhausted. I think I only managed 3/4 of this colossal place. Worth visiting. Short train ride from Gdansk.
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Old April 3rd, 2016, 11:40 PM   #2089
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhjo View Post
I remember I was there a few years ago. Schloss Marienburg is really BIG. After 3h sightseeing with guide I was exhausted. I think I only managed 3/4 of this colossal place. Worth visiting. Short train ride from Gdansk.
Agreed, Malborg castle is the real deal. Wawel in comparison seemed like a joke to me. Anyway this is me from today profanating the so called 'holy stone' between Tolkmicko and Fromborg. Hoped for a bloody story behind this rock having learned it was an altar of sorts but learned later to my regret that only fish was sacrificed. At least that's what singboard said.


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Old April 4th, 2016, 12:14 PM   #2090
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Wawel (pic. 1) and Malbork/Marienburg (pic. 2) 200 years ago...




After the Third Partition of Poland (1795), Wawel fell under Austrian rule. Austrian soldiers converted the hill into barracks and as a consequence, much destruction and alteration took place: the Renaissance arcades of the courtyard were walled up, the interior of the castle was changed and parts of the buildings were demolished; amongst the buildings destroyed were the churches of St. Michael and St. George.

Wawel complex in the 18th century (reconstruction)


PS. See this document about Malbork/Marienburg castle - link
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Old April 4th, 2016, 08:46 PM   #2091
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mruczek View Post
Prussian, so for layman Nearly-Lithuanian
Prussian was a West Baltic language, while Lithuanian is an East Baltic language.

So difference similar to for example Slovene vs. Russian or Polish vs. Bulgarian.
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Old April 4th, 2016, 10:09 PM   #2092
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Agreed, Malborg castle is the real deal. Wawel in comparison seemed like a joke to me. Anyway this is me from today profanating the so called 'holy stone' between Tolkmicko and Fromborg. Hoped for a bloody story behind this rock having learned it was an altar of sorts but learned later to my regret that only fish was sacrificed. At least that's what singboard said.
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Prussian was a West Baltic language, while Lithuanian is an East Baltic language.

So difference similar to for example Slovene vs. Russian or Polish vs. Bulgarian.
As I said: for layman nearly identical
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Old April 5th, 2016, 10:46 PM   #2093
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Chapel in Bredynki/Bredinken, Warmia






In 1599 the challenge of foundation of the village was undertaken by Serafin Zaręba, appointed a village administrator. With the approval of the Cardinal Andrzej Batory he received a permission to open a tavern. Also before the year 1600 the land was sold to the man called Albert for the construction of the mill (mill privilege granted on 18 May 1605).

In 1863 the water from the 20-acre lake basin, which was located in the centre of the village, was sucked out. The decision was taken by the owner of the mill (Gross), who noted a greater profit from the land under the lake than the pond itself. He persuaded the owner of the inn to sign a document stating that only the water belongs to the village, and the land under the lake belongs to him. However, the inhabitants quickly noticed their mistake, since the lake was a source of good water and habitat for the fish. During the riots which hindered the chances of reaching the goal by the owner, the squad of Prussian soldiers, which was called for help by Gross, entered into battle. As a result of the war 10 men and 4 women were killed. Later the same year, the residents erected the cross in the place of crime and in 1884 Jan Skupski (whose wife Elzbieta Skupski died during riots) built a chapel, where every Easter the mass commemorating those struggling for water is held.



PS. If you're wondering what are "dzyndzalki" or "farszynki", see the following link: http://podroze.gazeta.pl/podroze/7,1...ch-nalezy.html
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Old April 7th, 2016, 11:51 AM   #2094
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Polish newspaper "Gazeta Olsztyńska" (published in Olsztyn/Allenstein since 1886)


Short description of Warmia
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Old April 7th, 2016, 12:48 PM   #2095
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Stalag I-B Hohenstein was a German World War II prisoner-of-war camp located 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) west of Hohenstein (Olsztynek), East Prussia. The camp was partially located on the grounds of the Tannenberg Memorial and initially included a set of wooden structures intended to house World War I veterans during Nazi festivities.

Established in 1939 to house Polish soldiers captured in the course of the September Campaign, with time it was extended to house also Belgians, French, Italian, Serbian and Soviet soldiers. Harsh conditions, malnutrition, maltreatment and recurring typhoid epidemics led to many deaths among the prisoners. Notably during the winter of 1941-1942 roughly 25 thousand people died there, mostly Soviet soldiers.

It is estimated that altogether 650,000 people passed through this camp and its sub-camps. Between 50 and 55 thousand of them were buried in 500 mass graves at the Sudwa cemetery located nearby. The site is commemorated with a memorial stone by Ryszard Wachowski. Since 1980 the Olsztynek-based municipal museum hosts a small exhibition devoted to the camp and its inmates.

Parts of the former camp were uncovered during construction of the S7 Expressway.









World War II military cemetery in Sudwa, with mass graves of prisoners of the German Stalag I-B Hohenstein
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Old April 8th, 2016, 08:59 AM   #2096
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Open international competition for the architectural design of the Governmental historic and cultural complex on the grounds of the former order castle Königsberg in Kaliningrad ("Post-castle").

The 1st prize winning entry, reg.no 311 - application from Alexander Timokhin (Kaliningrad), project author - Anton Sagal (Kaliningrad/Milan)

Source
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Old April 8th, 2016, 12:12 PM   #2097
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Poles in Kaliningrad Oblast exhibit (http://www.muzeum-wegorzewo.pl/histo...im/page_01.htm)
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Old April 8th, 2016, 12:21 PM   #2098
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Folk band "Jezioranie" from Jeziorany/Seeburg, Warmia


Folk band "Rogóżanie" from Rogóż/Roggenhausen, Warmia
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Old April 9th, 2016, 10:10 PM   #2099
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Not all know this, becuse it was not part of Minor Lithuania. Goldap region was the borderland between Masuria and Minor Lithuania. However, it was Germanized relatively early on (already mostly Germanized before the mid-19th century, if we believe official census data at least).
I do not say that ALL, but as you shown to the north and to the east.
Here some mid of 18th century maps where Geldape is shown as not as border, but part of Minor Lithuania.



[IMG]http://www.************/forumas/picture.php?albumid=1077&pictureid=60855[/IMG]
By the way mass in church of Geldape held in Lithuanian and Polish until the end of 19th century.
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Old April 10th, 2016, 10:39 AM   #2100
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An interesting Principal Component Analysis (PCA) comparison of autosomal DNA of three ancient people - Late Bronze Age man named RISE 598, Late Bronze Age woman named RISE 595 and Iron Age woman named RISE 596 - with modern populations. RISE 598 man was buried near Turlojiske, very close to modern Lithuanian-Polish border. The two women were buried near Velika Gruda in Montenegro.

RISE 598 (who lived ca. years 908-485 BC) was similar to modern Poles (this PCA chart places him within the range of modern Polish samples). Also his Y-DNA was R1a, so the same which is the most common Y-DNA haplogroup of Poles. By contrast, samples from Montenegro - RISE 595 and RISE 596 - are not only significantly different from each other (perhaps suggesting migrations of genetically different peoples in that region between the Bronze Age and the Iron Age), but also both are significantly different from samples of modern Montenegrins:

http://polishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/20...se598.html?m=1



But what was ethnicity and language of that RISE 598 man from ca. 908-485 BC? I suppose that he could be a West Balt.

Linguists usually agree that Baltic and Slavic languages are closely related and originated from a common Proto-Balto-Slavic ancestral language. Most of linguists also consider Slavic languages to be more closely related to West Baltic than to East Baltic languages.

So it would make sense if Northern (Western + Eastern) Slavs are genetically similar to Balts, especially to West Balts.

Note that East Balts (e.g. Lithuanians and Latvians) originally lived far away from the sea - in the Forest Zone of Russia & Belarus.

East Balts migrated towards the Baltic Sea only later, mixing with Baltic Finns (like Estonians) and with West Balts.

----------------------

Warriors genetically related to people living in modern-day Poland fought in this Bronze Age battle: http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/...nze-age-battle

By 2019 we will know DNA of the Piasts: http://www.nto.pl/wiadomosci/brzeg/a...astow,9429360/ & http://www.nto.pl/magazyn/reportaz/a...ogami,9481669/


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