daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Forums > Architecture > European Classic Architecture and Landscapes

European Classic Architecture and Landscapes All related to historical buildings and landscapes of the old world.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old July 11th, 2013, 12:06 AM   #1141
musiccity
Retired Mod
 
musiccity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Phoenix, Arizona
Posts: 18,088
Likes (Received): 15095

Quote:
Originally Posted by KonstantinasŠirvydas View Post

From now on, everyone: Strictly only buildings (and ruins of some buildings).
I disagree, I not only allow but encourage historical discussion and debate in threads that relate to architecture. It's not only about buildings, that's what makes this forum unique from the others.
__________________
“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”

-Mark Twain

Highcliff liked this post
musiccity no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old July 11th, 2013, 06:29 AM   #1142
KonstantinasŠirvydas
BANNED
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,993
Likes (Received): 1110

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_Dach
Quote:
Simon Dach (29 July 1605 – 15 April 1659) was a Prussian German lyrical poet and writer of hymns, born in Memel (now Klaipėda) in the Duchy of Prussia.

Although brought up in humble circumstances, (his father was a poorly-paid court interpreter in Lithuania), he received a classical education in the Domschule of Königsberg, and in the Latin schools of Wittenberg, and Magdeburg, and entered the University of Königsberg in 1626 where he was a student of theology and philosophy. In 1626, he left Magdeburg to escape both the plague and the 30 Years War, and returned to his Prussian homeland, settling in Königsberg, where he remained for the rest of his life.
Central square of Klaipėda.

http://www.************/forumas/showt...p?t=837&page=9


http://laimei.blogas.lt/

Old picture (prior to the restoration of the theater).

http://turizmogidas.lt

Most famous


__________________

Highcliff liked this post
KonstantinasŠirvydas no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 11th, 2013, 06:44 AM   #1143
KonstantinasŠirvydas
BANNED
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,993
Likes (Received): 1110

Ännchen was marrying another man, his best friend
KonstantinasŠirvydas no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 11th, 2013, 12:50 PM   #1144
AmoreUrbs
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 661
Likes (Received): 4322

I can't see nothing that is not bad looking in this thread architectural-wise, it's a gem, but please, do not fight over the past and the old borders, it's useless and that's what caused wars in the first place.. remember that land doesn't belong to nations, it's all a product of nationalism that very often wants to create separation.. leave it all behind, and live in peace, and let's accept that many European countries have influenced each other over time
__________________

smugler, Highcliff liked this post
AmoreUrbs no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 12th, 2013, 01:07 AM   #1145
KonstantinasŠirvydas
BANNED
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,993
Likes (Received): 1110

Let us rest in piece those unimportant small nations, small ethnographic groups, that vanished.
No need to remember them, remember long gone past. They were useless anyway, left no grand buildings, cities.
Only who built something on no one's land, become the owner.

A book by the Old Prussian nationalists, XVI century.

wikipedia
Quote:
Catechismus in preusznische Sprach
und da gegen das deudsche
Koenigsberg: Hans Weinreich, 1545. [15] p.The oldest existing printed monument to the Balt languages - a catechism in the Prussian language. Translated from the German. There were two other catechisms in the Prussian language - in 1545, and in 1561. These two catechisms, as well as two hand-written Prussian language dictionaries (Elbing's and Grunau's) are the only monuments to the written works of the Prussians, an extinct Balt nation.
One nation (or ethnographic group) more, one nation less in Europe - who cares.
Do not remember the past = do not fight over the borders.
__________________

Highcliff, Atasas liked this post

Last edited by KonstantinasŠirvydas; July 12th, 2013 at 01:13 AM.
KonstantinasŠirvydas no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 12th, 2013, 01:37 AM   #1146
AmoreUrbs
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 661
Likes (Received): 4322

Maybe I should've said, "learn something from the past" after all .. we should not forget what happened, including the darkest periods, but we should learn from them and at the end of the day avoiding that something similar happens again.. I'm curious about the old Prussian language, there are many reconstructions of it going around.. of course it would've been probably sounding similar to Latvian and Lithuanian..
__________________

KonstantinasŠirvydas, Highcliff liked this post
AmoreUrbs no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 12th, 2013, 02:06 AM   #1147
Depeched
Registered User
 
Depeched's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Vilnius
Posts: 1,356
Likes (Received): 1090

Song in old-Prussian language

In Old-Prussian Saulika pateka, in current Lithuanian would be saulė pateka (sun rises)
__________________
>> MY PHOTO THREAD ABOUT LITHUANIA
>>MY PHOTOS FROM KLAIPĖDA (MEMEL)
>>> OLD LITHUANIA




Highcliff liked this post
Depeched no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 12th, 2013, 06:29 AM   #1148
RS_UK-PL
Registered User
 
RS_UK-PL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: R-L1029
Posts: 2,301
Likes (Received): 3392

How many Old Prussians lived in Prussia in the 16th-17th century? Correct me if I'm wrong, but it seems to me that Prussian ethnic group was back then almost fully extinct if there are only 3 preserved books that were published in the Old Prussian language. As I mentioned before, in the 16th century, Königsberg's printing houses published 183 titles in German, 104 in Polish, and 12 in Lithuanian, so in a single city there were more books printed for these ethnic groups, than for Old Prussians.
__________________

smugler, Rombi, Highcliff liked this post
RS_UK-PL no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 13th, 2013, 01:29 AM   #1149
KonstantinasŠirvydas
BANNED
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,993
Likes (Received): 1110

Quote:
Originally Posted by RS_UK-PL View Post
How many Old Prussians lived in Prussia in the 16th-17th century? Correct me if I'm wrong, but it seems to me that Prussian ethnic group was back then almost fully extinct if there are only 3 preserved books that were published in the Old Prussian language. As I mentioned before, in the 16th century, Königsberg's printing houses published 183 titles in German, 104 in Polish, and 12 in Lithuanian, so in a single city there were more books printed for these ethnic groups, than for Old Prussians.
Only 3 books in Lithuanian were printed in Vilnius and the whole of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in the 16th century. Does it mean, that "Lithuanian ethnic group back then was almost fully extinct"? I don't think so, nor it looks so today

Of course, Baltic Prussians were shrinking, but not dying out, but rather assimilating into Prussian Lithuanians (both languages had 63% similarity, compare, most Slavic languages have only 45-50% similarity, but they do have many things in common, so many, that knowing one Slavic language, it is not hard to learn the other Slavic or even understand more than half without learning; only Southern Slavic is somehow more different). The Prussian language itself, finally vanished around 1710s, after the plague. The last district of this language in the 1700s, was Sambian peninsula, few kilometers north of Königsberg.
KonstantinasŠirvydas no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 13th, 2013, 07:13 AM   #1150
RS_UK-PL
Registered User
 
RS_UK-PL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: R-L1029
Posts: 2,301
Likes (Received): 3392

So to sum up, Prussians (as an ethnic group) didn't write and read, haven't built any cities/towns or architectural gems since at least the 1500s, had no churches/temples, because like KonstantinasŠirvydas stated before, they were all pagans. But they existed in a large numbers. Fascinating...

Quote:
Only 3 books in Lithuanian were printed in Vilnius and the whole of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in the 16th century.
While from top of my head, I can list more than 40 Polish titles published in Vilnius/Wilno (and over 100 in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania) at the same time. Interesting...Btw, Polish-Lithuanian noble, Mikołaj Radziwiłł established in 1553 one of the first printing houses (Drukarnia Radziwiłłowska) that was publishing books solely in Polish.
__________________

smugler, Highcliff liked this post

Last edited by RS_UK-PL; July 13th, 2013 at 09:30 AM.
RS_UK-PL no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 13th, 2013, 12:08 PM   #1151
Prosp
BANNED
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 437
Likes (Received): 348

Quote:
Originally Posted by RS_UK-PL View Post
How many Old Prussians lived in Prussia in the 16th-17th century? Correct me if I'm wrong, but it seems to me that Prussian ethnic group was back then almost fully extinct if there are only 3 preserved books that were published in the Old Prussian language. As I mentioned before, in the 16th century, Königsberg's printing houses published 183 titles in German, 104 in Polish, and 12 in Lithuanian, so in a single city there were more books printed for these ethnic groups, than for Old Prussians.
I think the years of Plague is the best date-line.
In eastern parts of Prussia many indigenous people became what we now call - Prussian Lithuanians.
Before plague old prussians covered larger part of territory. Here we need to check information, but the plague and colonisation had disastrous consequences.
Secondly, we should not forget emigration. Many prussians, as well as yotvingians, semigalins etc. emigrated to GDL, so now in for instance, Trakai region, you can find prussian name villages (Bartai, Bartiškės, Dainaviai, Leipūnai, Leipalingis etc.) or peolple with...unusual surnames (Adle in lithuanian - Eglė.)

There are more historical prussian language sources. At the moment some linguists state that they have managed to reconstruct old prussian language.


Quote:
So to sum up, Prussians (as an ethnic group) didn't write and read, haven't built any cities/towns or architectural gems since at least the 1500s, didn't pray and had no churches. But they existed in a large numbers. Fascinating...
They existed in large numbers. Here we have no doubts. Germans also agree on that. It is not difficult to check, for instance, the available (in books etc.) list of people, who lived in one or another region and "belonged" to estate. The main reason why we have less prussian language books/source is still a widely disputed question and scholars are breaking spears. Maybe some of written source still are unknown or majority of books were lost? It is really possible.
There were many attempts to save/protects old-prussian/lithuanian language back then, and it gives explanation that majority of people, living in Prussia before Plague/Colonistation were native prussian speakers and official government made some attempts to give better opportunities to understand (again, religion) official policy (local peasants rebels). For instance, german-speaking priests tried to translate Bible to prussian language (home-made translations) or even to write a vocabulary (and it was done).

Other facts, acts implies and can answer to your questions. But again, it is a very broadly theme and when we are discussing about such matters we need to have/possess more appropriate information/knowledge.

Read? There were prussians in Europe Universities, so they know how to write (even left some prussian language fragments), but SIC! It was XV-XVI Europe. No national language. Mainly - latin.
Prussians studied in Basel, some italian university as well as in germanic lands. I do not know exact numbers, bus afaik were quite large.
Write? Baltic branch of Indoeuropean language is a very difficult language. If there were no writting tradition, development of the language, on the one hand, doesn't stop, on other hand, for writting tradition and it's formation we need some time (and necessity, i.e. Europe - Christianity as a basic, in GDL/Prussia chirstianity did play role of consolidation). Prussian quite early managed to wriite "something". But here we have anather problem - Lithuanian language in Prussia (many scholars, starting from University fathers Rapalionis, Kulvietis to XIX scholars). So who were they, lithuanian speaking prussians? And how we must consider them? Where we must draw a line? Imho, fundamental questions.

Haven built cities? Maybe wooden ones like Kaupas, Tvangsta. Here is the same answer - prussians, as well as other balts/fino-ugrians, were the last pagans. So, yes, we had not built structures of rocks/brics (in GDL, actually, we had (Vilnius, Kaunas, Trakai, Lyda, Krėva, Medininkai and we learned it from TO, as well as war-slaves played their part etc.)), plus, we lack of such material. The latter (brick structure) came to Prussia/GDL lands only with Christianity. So prussian cities per se were built in the same manner as in other our region countries (for example, Finland, Sweden). Wood as material. Even know it is very important. Like in other above-mentioned countries.
About pre-christian time sytuctures you can google. Mostly fortificated hillforts. Kernavė in Lithunia is the best example.

No compare same situation with more northern regions - Sweden, Norway, Finland and you will get an answer. It was a usual practice to build a city using local materials. However, cities were not large.

Did not pray/had no churches...Well, I have read how some Polish priests were shocked when saw in XVII century that some prussians before the war (preparation ritual?) sacrifised animals for their old gods. They had Churches, only a question - did they go there and pray? And actually did they understand it (religion) and different language (german/latin)? Highly doubt.

No we can compare the latter situation with GDL (northern part- present day Lithuania/northern part of present-day Belarus). XVII century. Counter-Reformation. Jesuits from Spain, Poland. What they have saw in Lithuania? M? That mostly majority of people (not elite nobles) did not know what is Christ, they still "worshiped" grass snake, old oaks, they did not go to church etc. I guess there were even no practical necessity to have a catechism.
Despite the fact that we had many native lithuanians who were educated and so on. So yeah baby, it is lithuania. Even world famous scientist Birtutė Galdikas (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birut%C4%97_Galdikas) said that "my father went to church but still worshiped Perkūnas" (http://www.lrytas.lt/lietuvos-diena/...i-perkunui.htm).

Quote:
While from top of my head, I can list more than 40 Polish titles published in Vilnius/Wilno (and over 100 in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania) at the same time. Interesting...Btw, Polish-Lithuanian noble, Mikołaj Radziwiłł established in 1553 one of the first printing houses (Drukarnia Radziwiłłowska) that was publishing books solely in Polish.
it is very understandable why - lithuanian written language book came to the daylight only in XVI cent (in GDL). In Prussia (Martynas Mažvydas) earlier. So in XVI number of printed books were not so high, differently than in XVII-XVIII century. Polish language was a relatively developed language back then. Do not forget that GDL (north ern lands) took baptism (and on some occasion,not very successfully) 400-500 years later than Poland/Belarus/Russia etc..
__________________

Highcliff, JValjean liked this post

Last edited by Prosp; July 13th, 2013 at 01:43 PM.
Prosp no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 13th, 2013, 09:54 PM   #1152
greg111
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 1,458
Likes (Received): 385

Quote:
Originally Posted by Prosp View Post
Even world famous scientist Birtutė Galdikas (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birut%C4%97_Galdikas) said that "my father went to church but still worshiped Perkūnas" (http://www.lrytas.lt/lietuvos-diena/...i-perkunui.htm).
Faery tales
greg111 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 13th, 2013, 10:18 PM   #1153
KonstantinasŠirvydas
BANNED
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,993
Likes (Received): 1110

Quote:
Originally Posted by RS_UK-PL View Post
So to sum up, Prussians (as an ethnic group) didn't write and read, haven't built any cities/towns or architectural gems since at least the 1500s, had no churches/temples, because like KonstantinasŠirvydas stated before, they were all pagans. But they existed in a large numbers. Fascinating...
You can troll as You always do, that "everything from Odra to Ural, from Tartu to the Black sea was Polskie" or better go and find numbers of Prussians, studying in Western European universities starting from 14th century (be sure, these are quite impressive numbers).

Also, I see historical Prussian and Lithuanian names in Northern East Prussia, but no Polish ones. I wonder why

Quote:
Originally Posted by RS_UK-PL View Post
While from top of my head, I can list more than 40 Polish titles published in Vilnius/Wilno (and over 100 in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania) at the same time. Interesting...Btw, Polish-Lithuanian noble, Mikołaj Radziwiłł established in 1553 one of the first printing houses (Drukarnia Radziwiłłowska) that was publishing books solely in Polish.
And more than half a century prior to that (1522 VS 1576), there Skorina, Mamonich printing houses were established in Vilnius (soon too Basylian printing house was established), that were publishing books almost solely in Cyrillic writings, in the Church Slavonic, Ruthenian and Old Byellarussian. So what?

Was there any restriction on selling books only in the city, where they were published or what?
KonstantinasŠirvydas no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 13th, 2013, 10:43 PM   #1154
KonstantinasŠirvydas
BANNED
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,993
Likes (Received): 1110

The oldest writing in any Baltic language was made in Prussian (XIV century!!!).
By the way, sounds very Lithuanian, can easily be understood.


Kayle rekyſe. thoneaw labonache thewelyse.
Eg. koyte. poyte. nykoyte. penega doyte.


„Sveikas, pone! Tu nebe geras dėdelis, jeigu tu nori gerti, [bet] nenori tu pinigą duoti.“

Hello, sir! You ain't a good man. You want to drink, [but] do not want to pay.

This sentence was found only very recently in Basel university. There are, of course, many more, only we must find. First Lithuanian texts from 1501 and 1503 were too found accidentally in the university of Vilnius only 30 years ago, written in the old books or put (hidden) inside the cover. I believe there are much more not only among the books in Vilnius, but also somewhere in Cracow, Berlin maybe as far as Ljubljana (recently, the first map, where it is believed, Vilnius was shown, was found in Ljubljana, mid. 14th century).

Quote:
One of the most exciting things of the last decade was the discovery of the Basel epigram by Stephen C. McCluskey, a student of the philosophy of science at the University of Wisconsin. While preparing a dissertation on the philosophy of science McCluskey was reading a Latin text entitled Questiones Super Quattuor Libris Methororum by Nicola Oresme and suddenly ran across some phrases in a language which he could not understand. He took these sentences to Professor Valdis Zeps, a Latvian who teaches in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Wisconsin. Zeps was apparently astounded and without comment sent a transcription of the phrases to me. As did Zeps, I immediately recognized them as being in a Baltic language, inquired about their origin and sent copies to my colleagues Professor Vytautas Mažiulis of the University of Vilnius and Professor Christian Stang (now deceased) of the University of Oslo. Both of the latter replied to me with very similar translations and also inquired as to the origin. The sentences are apparently in Old Prussian. Since the text by Oresme is dated 1369, these phrases constitute the oldest text in Old Prussian and indeed in any Baltic language. Facsimile copies appear in the frontispiece of the book, An Old Prussian Grammar (1974), McCluskey's 1975 article in General Linguistics (15.159-165) and Mažiulis' article in Baltistica in 1975 (11.125-131).
Quote:
There are questions about the translation, but the fundamental content seems clear. The sentences apparently in Old Prussian are accompanied by a drawing of a gentleman who is saying in German 'Jesus ich leid,' i.e., 'Jesus, I am suffering.' At first I interpreted this to mean that the gentleman has a hangover, that he is suffering from having drunk too much. My colleague and friend, Professor Oswald Szemerényi of the University of Freiburg (Germany) suggests that on the contrary, the gentleman is suffering because he needs a drink so badly. I don't know any way of resolving this important question and it would probably be necessary to call on a medieval historian to give us a clear answer. (My colleague, Professor A. Klimas of the University of Rochester points out to me that the German expression Jesus ich leid could possible be translated as 'Jesus I adore,' i.e., 'I adore Jesus' since at that time the verb leiden could mean 'to approve, to be fond of.')

I saw the original manuscript once in Basel, Switzerland, and in fact I spent several hours looking at it and there is really nothing essential that isn't revealed by the photographic copies. There is a little illumination, and there is a watermark which doesn't appear in the photograph. Presumably from the watermark one would be able to determine the origin of the paper at least.
Quote:
Since the Old Prussian texts are limited and the transmission is faulty, linguists tend to rely more on the evidence of Lithuanian than Old Prussian. Nevertheless there are a few features of Old Prussian which make it seem more conservative than Lithuanian. The Proto-Indo-European diphthong *ei is retained as ei in Old Prussian whereas in Lithuanian and Latvian it has passed to ie. Compare Old Prussian deiw(a)s 'God' beside Lithuanian Diẽvas, Latvian Dìevs. We assume that the older form has the diphthong *ei because in Sanskrit the Proto-Indo-European diphthong *ei is represented by -e- and the Sanskrit word for 'God' is devás (also written as deváh because in Sanskrit an -s becomes -h in word-final position). Likewise Latin Deus is derived originally from *deivos. Sequences of d or t plus a following j (pronounced like a y in English) before older ā or ū remained as such in Old Prussian, but passed to dž and č respectively in standard Lithuanian. (Dž is pronounced like the j in English jam; č is pronounced like the ch in English child.) Cf., e.g., Old Prussian median 'forest' which seems to have the same origin as the Lithuanian medžias (dialect word for forest). In Old Prussian it appears that the final -n has been retained whereas in Lithuanian the -n has been lost and the preceding vowel was lengthened. One can compare the Old Prussian accusative singular deiwan 'God' with the Lithuanian accusative singular Dievą. The hook under the -ą means that the vowel is long, but it originally denoted that the vowel was nasal. In Old Prussian the final -n is written, but we must remember that no living person has ever heard a native Old Prussian, so we don't know whether the final -n meant that the consonant was pronounced like -n or perhaps that the preceding vowel was nasal.

We have said enough about Old Prussian to give an idea of the problems connected with using it as evidence for the reconstruction of the Proto-Indo-European language. Next one must ask why Latvian isn't used as much for Indo-European linguistics. Well, of the two living Baltic languages Latvian is less conservative than Lithuanian. And I think that even the greatest Baltic linguist of all times, the now deceased Professor Jānis Endzelīns, a Latvian himself, would have admitted to this. For example, Lithuanian has retained an etymological k and g in all positions whereas in Latvian before the vowels i, ī, e, ē, ę, ę the original k and g have become c (pronounced ts) and dz respectively. For example, the nominative plural of the word for 'eyes' is ãkys (/ākīs/) in Lithuanian, ackis (/akis/) in Old Prussian, but in Latvian we find acis (/atsis/). Or the Lithuanian word for 'crane' is gérvė, Old Prussian is gerwe, but in Latvian we find dzerve. A very important word is the word for 'amber', Lithuanian giñtaras, but in Latvian dzĩtars. Note also that Latvian is less conservative in that the earlier ending represented by standard Lithuanian -as has passed to a simple final -s in Latvian. There are many other examples of innovation in the Latvian noun declension compared to the retention of the older form in the Lithuanian noun declension. Thus Lithuanian retains the old dative singular ending in vilk-ui, whereas Latvian has innovated by borrowing a pronoun or adjectival ending in vilk-am '(to the) wolf.' Note the Lithuanian dative singular masculine demonstrative pronoun tam(ui) '(to) that' from the Latvian counterpart of which, tarn, the noun ending of Latvian vilk-am is derived. Another example is the third person present tense of the verb. Where in Lithuanian the ending -a is retained, in Latvian it is lost, cf. Lithuanian velk-a 'drags' vs. Latvian vęlk which has the same meaning. Another feature which distinguishes Latvian from the more conservative Lithuanian is that under ordinary circumstances the sequence of vowel plus n in preconsonantal position has been replaced by a simple vowel. The formulae are as follows:

1. Lithuanian -an- = Latvian -uo- (written -o- in modern orthography), e.g. Lithuanian ranka = Latvian ruoka 'hand, arm.'
2. Lithuanian -en- = Latvian -ie-, e.g., Lithuanian penki = Latvian pieci 'five.' (Cf. also Greek pénte, Sanskrit pánca, pronounced punch ya, where we also see retention of the -n-).
3. Lithuanian -in- = Latvian -ī-, e.g., Lithuanian krintu = Latvian krìtu 'I fall.'
4. Lithuanian -un- = Latvian -ū-, e.g., Lithuanian juntu = Latvian jūtu 'I feel.'

Another reason for using Lithuanian rather than Latvian in our reconstruction is that Lithuanian has kept s and š (and the voiced counterparts z and ž) apart, whereas Latvian has merged them as s (and z) respectively. For example, Latvian has the s in sēdēt 'to sit' just like Lithuanian sėdėti, but where Lithuanian has š- as in šuo 'dog,' genitive singular šuns, Latvian has s-. Thus the Latvian word for dog is suns. It is probably for this reason that Latvian cannot use the inherited Baltic word for 'son' but has dēls instead of a word like Lithuanian sūnus, which in Latvian might turn out to be something like the word for 'dog.' Note also Latvian zināt 'to know' beside Lithuanian žinoti 'id.'
__________________

JValjean liked this post
KonstantinasŠirvydas no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 13th, 2013, 11:44 PM   #1155
KonstantinasŠirvydas
BANNED
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,993
Likes (Received): 1110


www.************/forumas


www.************/forumas
__________________

TimothyR, Highcliff liked this post
KonstantinasŠirvydas no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 15th, 2013, 07:51 PM   #1156
RS_UK-PL
Registered User
 
RS_UK-PL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: R-L1029
Posts: 2,301
Likes (Received): 3392

The military situation on 15 March 1945


Konigsberg (22 March 1945)


The military situation on 1 April 1945


So much cultural heritage and so many lives were lost in the last days of WW2 due to the Nazi fanatics.
__________________

smugler, Urbanista1, Highcliff liked this post

Last edited by RS_UK-PL; July 16th, 2013 at 12:22 AM.
RS_UK-PL no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 21st, 2013, 03:14 PM   #1157
Depeched
Registered User
 
Depeched's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Vilnius
Posts: 1,356
Likes (Received): 1090

One of other example that most important East Prussia heritage was destroyed not during WWII, but by Soviets.

Tilsit Lutheran church, view in 1949, also you can see city hall, all these buildings were destroyed after war.


************

Current view of city centre of Tilsit (Tilžė)/ Sovetsk from above from Lithuania side.


http://public.fotki.com/propeleris/sovetsk/
__________________
>> MY PHOTO THREAD ABOUT LITHUANIA
>>MY PHOTOS FROM KLAIPĖDA (MEMEL)
>>> OLD LITHUANIA




Highcliff liked this post

Last edited by Depeched; July 21st, 2013 at 03:21 PM.
Depeched no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 21st, 2013, 10:38 PM   #1158
Oslo2022
Registered User
 
Oslo2022's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Oslo
Posts: 594
Likes (Received): 849

Quote:
Originally Posted by Depeched View Post
One of other example that most important East Prussia heritage was destroyed not during WWII, but by Soviets.

Tilsit Lutheran church, view in 1949, also you can see city hall, all these buildings were destroyed after war.


************

Current view of city centre of Tilsit (Tilžė)/ Sovetsk from above from Lithuania side.


http://public.fotki.com/propeleris/sovetsk/
Terrible, terrible, terrible
__________________
Nå er det lenge siden 1952!
Oslo2022 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 24th, 2013, 08:28 PM   #1159
musiccity
Retired Mod
 
musiccity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Phoenix, Arizona
Posts: 18,088
Likes (Received): 15095

Guys, this is a sensitive topic. Tread carefully
__________________
“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”

-Mark Twain

Highcliff liked this post
musiccity no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 25th, 2013, 03:57 AM   #1160
KonstantinasŠirvydas
BANNED
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,993
Likes (Received): 1110

Quote:
Originally Posted by Depeched View Post
One of other example that most important East Prussia heritage was destroyed not during WWII, but by Soviets.

Tilsit Lutheran church, view in 1949, also you can see city hall, all these buildings were destroyed after war.


************

Current view of city centre of Tilsit (Tilžė)/ Sovetsk from above from Lithuania side.


http://public.fotki.com/propeleris/sovetsk/
__________________

Highcliff liked this post
KonstantinasŠirvydas no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
königsberg, polska

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 02:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu