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Old November 2nd, 2012, 05:58 AM   #101
Skyprince
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Wow so Trichy will be 1st international destination.
Hopefully price will drop to 400-500 RM roundtrip in average for KUL-Trichy flights , now flying to India is much costlier than 2 years ago by AirAsia
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Old November 2nd, 2012, 06:34 AM   #102
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidwsk View Post
Malindo Air brings forward operations date to mid-March

“We will delay Batik Air launch because we can now use Malindo to fly international routes. You must remember that Indonesians like to fly the world via Kuala Lumpur, Singapore or Bangkok and Lion Air, being the biggest domestic carrier can be a feeder for Malindo for the international connectivity,” he said.

...

“We now fly the most number of points within Indonesia and imagine the traffic volume that we can bring from all these destinations into KL and beyond to countries such as Thailand, China, India, Vietnam and Hong Kong,” he said, adding that “We would fly where the Indonesians like to go and the feed will be from Indonesia.”
This year Lion Air would have flown 30 million passengers, and next year it is targeting 35 million and Malindo Air CEO Chandran Ramamuthy said “if we can divert 10% of that traffic into KL and beyond, it would be good.”

...

Rusdi said the first two aircraft will be used to ply the Kuala Lumpur-Sabah and Sarawak routes.
The next two will be used for flights to India, and its first stop will be Trichy but New Dehli will be added to its network.

“In May we will fly to China and are looking at cities such as Canton and Shenzhen, and will also add Hong Kong,” he said.

Asked if Malindo had the rights to fly the international routes like China and India, he said “we are in the process of getting the rights.”

Chandran added that “we have had a series of meetings with the regulators and we are confident that we can start in March. We have submitted all the applications and are awaiting for approvals.”
Asked on competition he said “if you see AirAsia Indonesia and Garuda, they have a big network in Indonesia but their market share is smaller than ours and we have 600 take offs in a day, and we carry 100,000 passengers a day. So with kind of traffic, and if we have more destinations, we can carry more passengers. We fly to 69 points such as Sulawesi, Kalimantan, Pekan Baru, Medan, Semairiang, Solo, Pontianak and all this traffic (needs to go somewhere). That is why we think we can be successful with Malindo,” he said.
On the overwhelming response to Malindo walk in interview he said “it is good that there are a lot of people who want to be involved in the aviation industry. There is a good time to expand in Malaysia given the pool of human resources here.”

More: http://biz.thestar.com.my/news/story...8&sec=business
I do hope Malindo will connect PNK to KUL and KCH to BKK or CAN/HKG
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Old November 2nd, 2012, 08:27 AM   #103
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Indeed, Pontianak is a big city in Indonesia but still not connected to KUL.
I know ppl there love to visit Kuching, but why not visit KL if flying to KL is cheaper by low-cost air than taking bus to Kuching
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Old November 6th, 2012, 01:06 AM   #104
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Originally Posted by Skyprince
Indeed, Pontianak is a big city in Indonesia but still not connected to KUL.
I know ppl there love to visit Kuching, but why not visit KL if flying to KL is cheaper by low-cost air than taking bus to Kuching
Yes, Kuching is a popular destination for people from Pontianak. I believe KUL - PNK sector will be popular because beside tourism to KL it can serve as a transit point for Air Passenger beyond Malaysia as well as Air/Land around Peninsular Malaysia.

Flying thru KUL to international destination is more popular than flying thru CGK because of cheaper airfare.
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Old November 17th, 2012, 06:12 AM   #105
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Really impressed with the vision of Rusdi Kirana - featured in our big headline in our business newspaper today.

LION Air is on its way to become the largest ASEAN carrier by no. of fleet. Really impressive story here. It is even more exciting as millions of Indonesians will be given low-fare deals out of Jakarta via Kuala Lumpur - which means its akin to buy 1 free 1. Buy a trip to Guangzhou and get to see Kuala Lumpur as well.

Target market tourism = Indonesia, within ASEAN and beyond ASEAN.



Indonesia's Lion Air goes regional with Malindo
By B.K. SIDHU | The Star BizWeek | Saturday November 17, 2012
http://biz.thestar.com.my/news/story...0&sec=business
Quote:
RUSDI Kirana is one of Indonesia's wealthiest people. Together with his brother Kusnan, the Kirana brothers own Lion Air and are listed by Forbes as the 34th richest individuals with a net worth of US$580mil.


Rusdi (left) and Chandran strategising about Malindo.

But there was an air of simplicity surrounding Rusdi when he sat down to give his story to StarBizWeek. There was no phalanx of bodyguards, no designer clothes or an expensive timepiece on his wrist. Dressed ordinarily, all he had with him was a nondescript haversack.

“I walk without bodyguards because I feel nobody knows me,” he says.

He spoke about his start in the business world where as a salesman, he earned US$10 a month and was hungry every day. The interview eventually gravitated towards why he is a man that the airline industry in Malaysia needs to pay attention to.

Starting Lion Air with US$1mil in seed capital when the Indonesian government liberalised the market, Rusdi seems to have found the magic touch most businesses dream about. Lion Air has been profitable from its first day of operations and today, together with Wings Air, control 50% of Indonesia's domestic air passenger market.

A regional expansion is inevitable since there is a growing market for low cost travel in Asia. A courtship with Malaysia's Berjaya Air and Malaysia Airlines' Firefly fizzled out after two attempts but Rusdi eventually found a partner in little known Tan Sri Ahmad Johan of National Aerospace and Defence Industries Sdn Bhd (Nadi) to set up Malindo Air.

In the cut-throat airline business, one wonders if there is space for a third airline to operate out of Malaysia but Rusdi sees it from another perspective. He feels Malindo will be the bridge for all 240 million Indonesians who want to travel to the rest of Asean and the world.

“What we saw was an opportunity to do business in Malaysia. It is an expansion for the Lion Grup,” Rusdi, the president director of his flagship company, PT Lion Grup, says in an exclusive interview.

PT Lion has 49% stake in Malindo and Nadi 51%.

Rusdi is not the normal airline boss who will present papers at conferences or be seen at airline events, wrote Maybank Investment Bank in a report. However, this man and Lion Air shot into the limelight when he stood next to US President Barack Obama to sign a record 230 aircraft order with Boeing in February. It was the first time an airline has placed such a big order.



Malindo will take off earlier than planned, in mid-March instead of May and two weeks ago invited candidates to join the company. Around 3,000 people jostled for an interview to secure a job with the fledgling airline. Rusdi has promised to hire up to 600 of the 1,000 unemployed pilots in the country.

“It is good to remain unknown and that is why I avoid publicity, but I want people to know that I am serious about our venture in Malaysia and about employing pilots. It is not just an empty promise and we will offer fares same or lower than the competition,” he says.


A regional player

For more than a decade, Lion Air Indonesia's largest privately-owned airline focused solely on the Indonesian market, carrying passengers and feeding those passenger to other carriers because it had too few rights to fly international routes. It was going to launch Batik Air in March for its international operations because it needs the regional extension, but since setting up Malindo, the strategy has changed. Malindo will be Lion's launchpad into the region.

This is the same strategy AirAsia, Jetstar and Tiger Airways have employed, first focusing on the home market. Those airlines later set up ventures in other countries, thereby giving them a bigger market.

Lion Air and AirAsia are two carriers that have placed large numbers of aircraft from Boeing and Airbus respectively and they come with very aggressive delivery schedules. Both airlines have strong support from their respective aircraft manufacturers, and are able to access financing from export credit agencies.

The aggressive order book delivery schedules of Lion Air and AirAsia put them squarely at the forefront in the fight for Asian LCC dominance, says an analyst in his report.

Lion has ordered 381 aircraft, both narrow and wide body including the Dreamliner and AirAsia over 300. Tiger Airways and Jetstar also have orders but doesn't come close to what AirAsia and Lion Air have committed to.

Malindo has not begun flying and many do not see it as a real threat in the region. But those who know how Lion operates would not think so.

Lion has been able to control 50% of the domestic market share in Indonesia by flying the most number of routes, totalling 69 for now, and beats the competition with the lowest fares.

“The market has also not fully appreciated the impending entry of Lion Air into the regional low cost carrier space. We reviewed publicly available information on Lion Air and conclude that it has a fair chance of realising its regionalisation plans, putting it in direct competition with AirAsia in the pursuit of Asian LCC market dominance,” the analyst says.

“Lion may be better positioned than AirAsia to achieve regional dominance, even though AirAsia has a headstart. Lion has access to a larger hinterland and a faster growing market Indonesia to generate cash flows to fund its regionalisation strategy compared with AirAsia, which has primarily funded its regionalisation plans from its Malaysian operations. While Lion has a smaller fleet than AirAsia, all its aircraft are based in Indonesia, which may allow it to generate strong cash flows vs AirAsia, which has only half its fleet in Malaysia.”

Whatever the analysis, the real test would be when Malindo takes to the skies. But Malaysia may not be Rusdi's only stop; the region is his playground now.

“It depends on which country or government that wants to support us. We just want to do business, not lobby or try to provoke,” he says.


The gateway

For Rusdi, the entry to Malaysia is about providing Indonesians with a window to the world.

Jakarta is now the main hub for travellers in Indonesia, that geographically has 1,750 islands. For some islands, the only link is by air. Being the fourth most populous country in the world, its growing middle class is travelling more than before.



Rusdi says GDP growth in Indonesia last year meant about 35 million people joined the middle class, and it is this group that is keen to travel. No doubt Lion Air now flies to Singapore, Malaysia, Vietnam and Saudi Arabia, but routes are limited and it is predominately a domestic carrier.

“We fly to 69 cities within Indonesia from our eight hubs and have more than 600 take-offs and carry over 100,000 passengers a day. Anyone that lives in Medan, Balik Papan, Pekanbaru or even Surabaya has to go to Jakarta now to go abroad, and that would cost them more in air fares and take more time.

So the main purpose is to make either Singapore or Malaysia a gateway to carry Indonesian passengers onward. Now we have Malindo, which is going to be our gateway to fly to KL and beyond,” Rusdi says.

Lion Air estimates it will ferry 30 million passenger this year and 35 million next year. Garuda International holds 23% of the domestic market share and AirAsia 2.2%.

“We plan to fly from our west hub into KL and east hub to Kota Kinabalu, and the traffic is about the same for both the hubs. Malindo will offer 500,000 to 600,000 seats in the first year,” Rusdi says, adding that Malindo will have hubs in KLIA2 and Kota Kinabalu.

Hence, he is not so worried about traffic and not so focused on the Malaysian traffic. He feels Indonesian traffic will fill his planes.

For a start Rusdi is talking about having two aircraft that are meant for Batik Air to be diverted to Malindo, and each month onwards Malindo will add two more to get 12 next year and in 10 years, Malindo is projected to have 100 aircraft. By then, it would have covered much of Asia and perhaps even gone beyond Asia when five Dreamliner aircraft are channelled to Malindo.

Since the focus is to grow Malindo, Batik will take a back seat and the launch has been delayed to second half of 2013. Malindo will be Lion's international arm while Batik will be a full service carrier for the domestic Indonesian market and Wings Air flies the ATR type of aircraft and ply the very remote routes as a feeder service to Lion Air's trunk routes.


Creation of jobs

For a start, Malindo will hire 700 people, of which 100 will be pilots, 250 crew and the rest engineering and general support staff, says Malindo Air CEO Chandran Ramamuthy.

Chandran expects the airline to hire about 5,000 people over the next 5 years.

Besides creating jobs, there will be other spill off businesses in the travel trade. All points to more vibrancy in the economy. About 3,000 people attended Malindo's walk in interview on November 1 to 3 and of that about 600 pilots will be hired in stages, according to Chandran.

“We are in the midst of finalising the recruitment of our senior management team,'' he added.

“We (Malindo and Lion Grup) have the capacity to absorb up to 1,000 pilots given our growth plans and our plane orders,” Rusdi adds.

Malindo will operate initially from KLIA and move to KLIA2 when it opens its doors on May 1 next year. KLIA2 is more than 60% complete now. Malindo is likely to take up 3,000 sq m to 4,000 sq m of space at KLIA2 once it starts operations. It is renting about 400 sq m of space at KLIA now.

Rusdi says Malaysia Airports has offered 10 acres of land to Malindo near KLIA2 for its office building and a training centre.

“We are going to see the land that we will lease from Malaysia Airports to build a training centre and also our headquarters. We will duplicate the centre like the one we now have in Jakarta,” Rusdi says.

It will take time to build the facility but by mid next year the airline will move a simulator meant for Jakarta to KL so pilots can be trained here instead of going to Jakarta. Another simulator will be added if there is a need.

Besides AirAsia, Malindo and Lion Air, KLIA2 will have other tenants such as Zest Airways, Tiger Airways, and Cebu Pacific Air.


Low, low fares

Rusdi has promised “fares will be same or lower than competition” as competition will often lead to a drop in ticket prices.

But Malindo is not going to just compete on fares, it would provide larger seat pitch, light meals, in-flight entertainment and WiFi facilities and free baggage allowance.

“In our view, Malindo's hybrid product offering is closer to Malaysia Airlines than AirAsia. However, ticket prices will be lower or on par with AirAsia and we see Malindo's entry into Malaysia as breaking the airline duopoly.

“More than trying to be a keen competitor in what is already a well-penetrated Malaysia LCC market, we think Lion Air's intent behind its new Malaysia JV airline is to firstly dampen sentiment towards AirAsia's regionalisation plan, and secondly to weaken the monopoly LCC position of AirAsia Malaysia,” wrote an analyst in his report.

But AirAsia has grown stronger over the years and is now Asia's biggest LCC. But still, analysts argue that Malindo is going to adopt the same strategy that it did in Indonesia to win passengers in Malaysia by offering fares that are lower.

As such, Lion may not be the “rational competitor” AirAsia hopes for.

We think Malindo's fares may be set much lower than AirAsia's as Lion employs the same “funding strategy” by using Indonesian domestic profits to subsidise its pre-emptive regionalisation strategy,” wrote the analyst.

But Rusdi says that “if we do not have a better cost base how could we (offer low fares).”

He says he is able to offer low fares because Lion Air operates a new fleet and there are manufacturers' guarantees.

“It's like a honeymoon period, and we also fly our aircraft an average of 14 to 16 hours a day (versus the competition which is 10-12 hours) and that means we are getting better utilisation of our aircraft versus many other airlines.

“We can do that because our aircraft are new and they do not need a lot of maintenance but if they are old, maintenance cost is higher and that adds into airline cost,” he says.

He reiterates that the maximum flying range of his aircraft is between five and six hours because they have extended range and it is due to all these factors that they can offer better fares than the competition.


The challenge

“You should know your people. We can buy aircraft and spares and make passengers happy, offer low fares and build facilities. But the most difficult thing is to mange your employees and that is one of the reasons why we are giving our employees facilities. We just want them to work honestly,'' he says.

That may be his challenge but as more aircraft are delivered to LCCs in Asia, overcapacity is inevitable.

A report says Lion Air and AirAsia are expanding their combined fleet by 17-20% per year over the next three years, which may exceed the industry demand growth of about 15% per annum.

Consolidation is inevitable as smaller country focused airlines without a dominant market share become attractive targets for regional-focused airlines keen to expand market share and gain access to limited airport slots.

An analyst said that he doubts Jetstar and Tiger will become leaders in the Asian LCC industry in their own right (because of their own reasons), and he feels the real fight for dominance will be between Lion Air and AirAsia.


Simple lifestyle of airline boss



Rusdi Kirana (above), 49, although wealthy, still lives by the mould that has made him the person he is today.

Those attributes were born from the humble beginnings and the tough early life where the feeling of hunger was all too common for Rusdi.

Until recently, he was taking economy flights to destinations as far as Seattle. It's not because he cannot afford a first or business class ticket.

“I started off as a salesman selling Brother typewriters. It was not an easy time. At that time my salary was about US$10 a month. After that I worked at a bakery that imported flour and chocolates. I can make croissants and blackforest cake because I was selling them and I had to show the hotels how it was done. I can even bake cookies.”

He left the bakery to join an advertising company and a while later his brother asked him to join a travel agency.

“We understand the meaning of being hungry and that was when my salary was US$10 a month. We used to be hungry then and we used to be hungry in high school and we understand how people feel when they don't have something. That is why we only buy what we need.

“I can buy a Roll Royce in a minute because I have the money, but do I need it? There must be a purpose not just because I want luxury items. That is also why I do not use the private jet we have. We can take regular flights and we use the money for other things,” he says.

Rusdi says he uses the private jet if he has to visit a number of cities over a short period. The jet is now used for business passengers.

Family to him is an integral part of his life. He spends a lot of time with them and now lives in Singapore because one of his three children is studying there. His wife works for Lion Grup in Singapore.

“I spent a lot of time with my family and I have worked from home in the last two months. I tell my staff that if they cannot take care of their families they should not work for this company. To me, family is first and job is second. You can be successful if your family is happy and you cannot be fighting with your wife and still be successful,” he says. He has delegated a lot of his work to his executives but is kept updated by reports from them.

Apart from reading books, Rusdi likes watching television or going to the cinema. He is not the sort to go to parties, attend ceremonies or social events as his life is centred on his family.

He has three homes in Jakarta, Singapore and Johor Bharu but he does not have any full time maids. He says a cleaner tidies up his home in Jakarta a few hours every few days.

“In Singapore we do not even have a maid or a driver. We clean our own home and wash our own clothes. At the end of the day you will respect and see the value of family life more than other things in the world,” he says.


Quote:
Prospects of new Southeast Asian airline
The Star BizWeek | Saturday November 17, 2012
http://biz.thestar.com.my/news/story...8&sec=business

It was near to impossible to get an interview with Rusdi Kirana, the president director of Indonesia's Lion Air, but when the call came through late on Thursday night that the interview was fixed for Friday 10am, the only fear was it would be cancelled because Rusdi rarely meets the press. But B.K. Sidhu had a breakfast interview with him and here are excerpts of the interview:


Forbes in 2011 listed you and your brother Kusnan as being worth US$580mil and the 34th richest men in Indonesia. Your comment?

I don't know how they value me (and Kusnan) and I don't even know how much money we have. We don't take dividends and we do not get a salary. We just buy and the company reimburses us for what we need.

It is not so much about personal money but how we can grow the company and how we can do good for the company, its staff and society.

Today we have 15,000 staff and are building 1,500 houses for some of them. This is the first stage and we will subsidise them for 10 years and after that they will own the homes. The facility comes with a school, religious facilities, hospital, swimming pool and a cinema. The housing is for general staff.

A large number of our staff live out of Jakarta as the cost of living in a big city is high. They need to travel to work and they will be nearer to work with this facility.


Why did you chose the airline business?

I will not be in the airline business if I get a second chance. I was once interviewed by an airline magazine and I said only stupid people run an airline. I rather build a hotel or food business but since I do not have a choice, and since I was a travel agent and only knew about the travel industry, I am in it. Now that I am in it, I have an obligation to our lenders, bankers, and our staff. The airline business is tough business; it is a 24/7 business and I appreciate and admire (Tan Sri) Tony (Fernandes) that he is involved in the airline business.


Why are you publicity shy?

I don't like to be interviewed because I don't want to be famous. It limits me. But I do give talks at universities without media coverage. I also try to do some social work that makes me feel real in life. I clean the HDB flats for some old people in Singapore and do some things for the poor in Batam. I am happier doing this kind of things rather than gaining publicity.


When is Lion Air's IPO?

We have not considered that seriously. What we want to do is let it stay private since we are doing a lot for the staff. Since it is private, we do not need shareholder's approval. Once we have done all of that and when we have 65% of the domestic air passenger market share, we will then consider. Lion Grup is also making money and it has a good relationship with our bankers and lenders. We are not in a rush to look for money.


Malindo Air. Why Malaysia?

Your Prime Minister asked me the same question. I told him I have a few choices, either Singapore or Malaysia but I (still) think this is the best route I would like to get. The main purpose is to make either Singapore or Malaysia a gateway to carry Indonesian passengers onward. We are not only looking for Malaysian travellers. With due respect, Indonesia has a population of over 200 million (which is many times larger than) Malaysia's 28 million people. If we only base (our market) on Malaysia, there is already AirAsia and Malaysia Airlines which are big and good airlines and the cake would be quite small to share between the three of us.

But since we are looking at onward (traffic), we think it is good to do it in Malaysia. If we combine the (travelling) Indonesians and the population of places we will travel to, say Canton or Shenzhen and Indonesia and via Malaysia, then the travelling population would be big.

Last year, 35 million Indonesians joined the middle income group and these people will first visit Asean countries like Singapore or Malaysia. This group will later think of Hong Kong or even Canton and when they have more money and they will want to travel to Japan, Korea, North China or Australia. So we have that segment (of the market to cater to).


How much are you spending to set up Malindo?

We are a private company and we do not tell. What we saw was an opportunity to do business in Malaysia. As a private company we do not have any loans, not even US$1, but we have aircraft financing. Ours is a family business and we see Malaysia as an expansion for the Lion Grup and we will invest in 100 aircraft over 10 years for Malindo.


What's the plan on destinations and aircraft usage?

We start in mid-March and will begin with two aircraft to fly domestic routes. In April we will fly to India, most likely to Trichy and in May to China, either Canton or Shenzhen.

We are flying international because we want to better utilise our aircraft instead of parking them in KL overnight. We can fly to India at night because it is accepted to arrive in India at 1am but we cannot do the same in China because people are not used to a 4am landing.

When the aircraft is not parked uselessly, we are then making better use of them and that is why we can sell our tickets cheaper because our fixed cost is covered.


Why Nadi? They do not have the expertise and how did you meet them?

We do not need people who understand the airline business because we understand the business. We met each other at an event. I always wanted to do business in Malaysia or Singapore because of the gateway.


Does Malindo have the rights to fly to destinations like Trichy?

Malaysia is giving us the spare rights to Trichy which is not taken by other airlines. The rights to Chennai, Mumbai and New Dehli are all taken. However, rights are negotiated periodically and for India, we will for now go to secondary points. For China, we will go to Canton, Shenzhen and even Beijing. That would be Malaysia's rights.


Are you still meeting Fernandes for dinner?

For me it is like this I am impressed for what he has done. He asked for an appointment and he said we don't need to become enemies. I am a businessman and I never want to treat people or competitors as enemies. If we have a chance to sit down for dinner or lunch, it is fine. But I am not going to talk about business. I don't want to give the impression that we are going to form a cartel. But it is fine to meet my competitor and to have fun together.
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Old November 17th, 2012, 09:04 AM   #106
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When is he going to take over a F1 team or EPL team ?
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Old November 17th, 2012, 04:04 PM   #107
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When is he going to take over a F1 team or EPL team ?
Tony will butthurt...
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Old November 17th, 2012, 06:05 PM   #108
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I think flying time from Jakarta to Guangzhou, Shenzhen, HK and Indian points are over 4:30 hrs , thus it's more economical to fly B737 out of KL
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Old November 18th, 2012, 04:23 AM   #109
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Quote:
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here comes the nationalists..
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Originally Posted by CrazyForID View Post
well, for me. i would rather fly with airasia since many tail strikes happened to lion fleet recently
and now airasia tickets can be booked by debit as well. i just bought may 2013 flights using my klikbca account

and baggage fee... who cares about baggage fee when you can get extremely cheap promo flights?
what bright_shield said is mostly true, no nationalism inside...

different people, different preference... I travel a lot due to my job... got GOLD Garuda Frequent Flyer in less than a year to show you how frequent I fly... whenever I don't fly with Garuda, I choose LionAir or Citilink for domestic trips... the reason is clear: my office buys tickets through travel agents (this what many offices in Indonesia do, I believe), and there are many more LionAir flights than AirAsia in Indonesia....
I think this is why LionAir can beat AirAsia in Indonesia...

BUT whenever I go to KL or Spore for a personal trip, I definitely open AirAsia website and book a ticket...

It has nothing to do with nationalism... don't be too sensitive..

and I suppose we're talking about Malindo here? ...

Last edited by bhirawa; November 18th, 2012 at 04:42 AM.
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Old November 18th, 2012, 04:27 AM   #110
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Really impressed with the vision of Rusdi Kirana - featured in our big headline in our business newspaper today.

LION Air is on its way to become the largest ASEAN carrier by no. of fleet. Really impressive story here. It is even more exciting as millions of Indonesians will be given low-fare deals out of Jakarta via Kuala Lumpur - which means its akin to buy 1 free 1. Buy a trip to Guangzhou and get to see Kuala Lumpur as well.

Target market tourism = Indonesia, within ASEAN and beyond ASEAN.
I think what he does is precisely what TF does...TF/AA facilitates Malaysians to travel outside the country cheaply... and that's what Rudi wants to do with Indonesians... he might get the idea from TF!
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Old November 18th, 2012, 02:41 PM   #111
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I hope that with Malindo's entry into Malaysia airfares would be lower...Bad for the airlines but good for the traveling public.
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Old November 18th, 2012, 02:58 PM   #112
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Malaysian consumers will benefit from Malindo, especially since Lion Air is dominant in Indonesia, Malindo could increase connectivity to Indonesia itself.

However, there is one BIG casualty here. Not AirAsia. Rather MALAYSIA AIRLINES - the national flag carrier. It completely lost alot of market share in domestic and regional routes.
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THE KUALA LUMPUR DEVELOPMENTS COMPILATION (LATEST: NOV'2013) >>> PAGE 1 >>> PAGE 2 (Suburb)

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Old November 19th, 2012, 06:47 AM   #113
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Originally Posted by patchay
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However, there is one BIG casualty here. Not AirAsia. Rather MALAYSIA AIRLINES - the national flag carrier. It completely lost alot of market share in domestic and regional routes.
Well they better learn how Garuda turn it around and apply it to MH before its to late.
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Old January 7th, 2013, 02:29 AM   #114
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Stiffer competition expected for MAS, AirAsia and Firefly with Malindo flying in

7-JAN-2013


PETALING JAYA: The local aviation industry is set for more interesting times when Indonesian low-cost carrier Malindo Airways takes flight in May.

Although established players Malaysia Airlines (MAS), Firefly and AirAsia remain optimistic on the outlook for the year, the entry of Malindo 51%-owned by Malaysia's National Aerospace and Defence Industries and 49% by Indonesia's largest low-cost carrier Lion Air - will definitely grab the attention of both industry observers and travellers alike.

Affin Investment Bank Bhd analyst Sharifah Farah said in a recent report that Malindo's commencement of operations here would also coincide with the scheduled completion of the low-cost carrier hub KLIA2.

“Upon the commencement of the new airline, we expect airlines to offer cheaper fares and various promotions to garner market share and/or retain market share,” she said, adding that the main concern would be AirAsia's ability to maintain its load factor without significantly compromising its yield in the face of new competition.

Sharifah noted that against the backdrop of a fragile economic outlook, which had already negatively impacted air travel, historical trends showed that low-cost carriers would likely fare better than full-fledged carriers due to their lean cost structure, competitive pricing and the switch by business travellers to cheaper fares.

She said this was evident in the number of passengers carried by AirAsia Malaysia, which grew 10.2% year-on-year to 14.5 million for the nine months to Sept 30 last year. Similarly, AirAsia's Thai and Indonesian arms saw passenger numbers grow by 19.6% and 12.8%, respectively.

In contrast, for the same period, MAS experienced a 3.7% drop to 9.7 million passengers due to weak international travel.

MAS' regional senior vice president for Malaysia/Asean Muzammil Mohamad recently said the airline was forecasting between 10% and 15% growth with a few more destinations and more frequencies, which would go hand-in-hand with ticket sales revenue growth for the year.

He said although the industry outlook for the year would be challenging, the airline was optimistic about its prospects.

Sharifah said the direction of the jet fuel price would continue to be the biggest challenge for the aviation industry. Over the past one year, the crude oil price has remained elevated, ranging between US$85 (RM259.25) and US$115 (RM350.75) per barrel, while the price of jet fuel also remained high within the range of US$120 (RM366) to US$137 (RM417.85) per barrel.
Sharifah has an assumption of US$120 (RM366) to US$125 (RM381.25) per barrel for the house's earnings model for the industry in 2013.


More: http://biz.thestar.com.my/news/story...2&sec=business

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Old January 13th, 2013, 11:47 AM   #115
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Malindo Air says its financing is intact
By B.K. SIDHU Thursday January 10, 2013
http://biz.thestar.com.my/news/story...&if_height=202

PETALING JAYA: Malindo Air, which is gearing to launch its services in March after it secured the principle air services licence from the Government recently, has denied it is in any financial difficulty.

“There is no financial problem. In fact, our funding is intact as we have strong financial backing from our shareholders,'' its chief executive officer Chandran Ramamuthy told StarBiz.

He was responding to an OSK Research report that quoted rumours saying that Malindo's major shareholder National Aerospace and Defence Industries Sdn Bhd (Nadi) was reluctant to pour more capital into its joint venture (JV) with Indonesia's PT Lion Grup.

Malindo is 51% owned by Nadi and 49% by PT Lion Grup, the parent of Indonesia's privately-owned airline, Lion Air, which in turn controls about half of the Indonesia domestic air travel market.

Nadi main shareholder Tan Sri Ahmad Johan when contacted yesterday declined comment while Lion Air president director Rusdi Kirana, who is also part owner of PT Lion Grup, was not available for comment as he was travelling to the United States.

Financing has not been an issue for Lion Air, which is buying more than 300 aircraft, with most of them funded by export credit agencies.

Chandran said Malindo was in the midst of submitting its application for the air operator's licence and was in the final stages of hiring the first batch of pilots and cabin crew who will undergo training beginning February to prepare themselves for its launch.

The issue of any shareholder not wanting to pour in money for the airline to take off had not cropped up, said someone familiar with the new low-cost airline.

The OSK report also said that “.... due to the JV's limited capital, we gather that Malindo charges a fee for any new commercial pilot licence (CPL) holder with B737 NG-type rating who is interested to become pilots. Charges are estimated at US$30,000 for the first 500 hours, with no salary.''

Chandran clarified that it was an industry practice to charge pilots a fee when they underwent aircraft-type training.

Some airlines charge candidates for the training and others absorb it initially but later bond the candidates for several years and deduct their salaries, and in some cases, this is not made transparent.

“It is an arrangement with Malindo. Given the huge number of unemployed graduates and the fact that Malindo is offering jobs, even if it charges or offers loans, it is still helping to absorb the excess number of pilots in the country; so that should not be seen as an issue,'' said an industry observer.
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Old February 18th, 2013, 11:50 AM   #116
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PK-LKS, the B738 that are not taken up by JT, seems to be the first aircraft for Malindo...

image hosted on flickr

Malindo Air 9M-LNB by Drewski2112, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

9M-LNB_B738_KBFI_2013FEB14 by HornetHunter91, on Flickr
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Old February 19th, 2013, 10:03 AM   #117
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We r near month of march...a time the malindo supposely start to take off...
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Old February 19th, 2013, 10:21 AM   #118
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cannot sell ticket until they get the AOC. Proving flight on Thursday to BKI
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Old February 21st, 2013, 04:05 PM   #119
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Old February 21st, 2013, 04:51 PM   #120
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Originally Posted by Arkdriver View Post
cannot sell ticket until they get the AOC. Proving flight on Thursday to BKI
How about kl to other domestic routes beside kk u mentioned above ?? I really hope kbr to k.kinabalu n kuching
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