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Old October 8th, 2012, 12:06 PM   #1
achwel
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question about standard sizes

Hi,

I am looking for standard sizes between floor and ceiling of houses and offices of european and american buidlings in meters.

thanks for any responce
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Old October 9th, 2012, 12:25 AM   #2
mhays
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Depends on what sort of building. Housing and hotels are very different from offices or especially laboratories, hospitals, etc. Not to mention uses like schools that often value very high ceilings.

Also, are you measuring head room or building height? If the latter, floor-to-floor is the common measurement, not floor-to-ceiling.
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Old October 9th, 2012, 12:59 AM   #3
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When i saw this question i laughed so hard....but ofcourse, 6" is part of my answer




The most common is 3.3m to residential buildings, 50cm for hvac and other instrumental devices and tubes, cables.. etc... In recent times, some are made with 3.5m on average.

For commercial and office ones is common 4m. For lobby double height, you can consider 8 or 10m. This is the base we use to estimate height in diagrams as well.

Slabs

Generally speaking a concrete residential highrise is 7-8" slabs, office are 9-10" and hotels somewhere in between.

Anticipated loading requirements also play a part and change these numbers.

Parking slabs are thicker, up to 12" but have far more rebar. however, it depends on column spacing and the such as well.

There are other types of slab construction as well - for example, post-tensioned systems where you could be a little as 6". Also, don't forget steel deck systems (used with steel frame construction), where again the steel deck and cast concrete could be as little as 3" and up.

In any system, regardless, it always reduces to the supporting arrangement: joists, beams, girders, columns, and walls (size, position, spacing, etc.). Material strengths play a lesser role but also have some effect. Ditto for loading.

In most floors, if you know the clear span between the major supports - divide that span by a factor between 20 and 30 to estimate a reasonable depth for the whole floor system including beams, joists, etc.

Also - don't forget to add your non-structural topping (a cementitious topping that that helps make a smooth level top surface), false-floors (raised floors for conduits, cables, etc.), etc.
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Old October 9th, 2012, 11:42 PM   #4
achwel
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Thank you both for replaying,

why where you laughing ? is this is a strange question? i really dont know the standard sizes and if its the same in all countries

I ask this becose european houses like in holland the standaard heights was 2.7 meters and now 3 meters en tennements 3.5 meters and offices around 4 meters from floor to ceilings I dont know about hospitals and schools.

but is this also standard for UK buildings? or french buildings?
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Old October 11th, 2012, 06:02 AM   #5
Innsertnamehere
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Standard floor hieght is around 2.95-3 meters here in toronto. thats for 8' Interior ceilings though. (2.4m)
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Old October 11th, 2012, 07:07 PM   #6
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My city has tight height limits. It also has tight FAR limits for commercial space, but no FAR for residential space.

The result is that residential projects squeeze in as many floors as possible within the allowed height. If it's a 240' zone, any building will be 24 floors, because 25 wouldn't work and 23 wouldn't pencil. There's a little more leeway in 400' zones, where one floor difference has less impact. Also very high-end buildings might have higher ftf as a selling point.

Woodframes in 65' zones are interesting. This is Seattle's most common building type. Woodframe can be five levels, so those go on a concrete base. The concrete base is very often townhouses, live-work, or retail. For all of those, it's very common to have a high ceiling in front, and a split level in back, with the back spaces having very low ceilings.
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Old October 14th, 2012, 08:51 PM   #7
achwel
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Thank you all for the information
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