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Old February 5th, 2013, 11:45 PM   #101
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Time to bid farewell to 22 Thames Street, NYC.
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Old February 6th, 2013, 01:58 AM   #102
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At least it was just a glass box
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Old February 6th, 2013, 02:11 AM   #103
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Let's wait until the wrecking ball is actually on site. But it doesn't look good for 22 Thames unfortunately.
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Old February 6th, 2013, 03:56 AM   #104
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CNB30 View Post
At least it was just a glass box
I think you're talking about 22 Cortland. 22 Thames is that beautiful red old building in the picture.

This will replace it. Unique, but in a terrible location. The plot next to it is half empty an the other half has an ugly white low-rise. But instead they choose to demolish what should be landmarked.
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Old February 6th, 2013, 04:11 AM   #105
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Uh Oh!!!!
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Old June 13th, 2013, 03:59 PM   #106
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Another classic American re-clad:

The Nasby Building in Toledo, Ohio. Completed in 1895 to a design by Edward Fallis.

Original 1895 appearance:

Source: http://www.shorpy.com/image/tid/297

The dome was removed during the '30s, while the whole building was later covered in metal plates in 1964. After new look:

Source: http://wikimapia.org/showphoto/?obj=...g=0&id=1983625

This link should lead you do a short resumé of the building:
http://books.google.no/books?id=Ri7A...toledo&f=false

At streetview: https://maps.google.no/maps?q=Madiso...8.11,,0,-23.14
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Old June 13th, 2013, 04:12 PM   #107
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Hotel Westminster, Boston.


Full size version here: http://www.shorpy.com/node/10250?size=_original#caption

Source: http://www.shorpy.com/node/10250


Was demolished to make way for this building:
https://maps.google.no/maps?q=trinit...0.17,,0,-38.66
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Old June 13th, 2013, 04:26 PM   #108
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Keith's Theatre, Boston. Probably the only one flamboyant art nouveau buildings that have ever been in the US. It have sadly been lost.


Full size version here: http://www.shorpy.com/files/images/3c33476u.jpg

Source: http://www.shorpy.com/node/6560


Today:
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=loc:4...2.95,,0,-24.39
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Old June 13th, 2013, 04:44 PM   #109
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BEAUTIFUL BUILDINGS, BEAUTIFUL LOSS
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Old June 14th, 2013, 06:12 PM   #110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by photolitherland View Post
The anhilation of Penn Station is what sparked the modern day preservation movement in America. Unfortunately it getting destroyed actually saved a lot more of NYC and around America from the wrecking ball.
All too true -- but what a price to pay. Simply unthinkable.

An excellent documentary on the tragic destruction of mighty Penn.



At least Germany and SF have an excuse for their losses -- wars of annihilation and earthquakes. But in New York, there is no justification for these tragedies.
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Old June 15th, 2013, 12:32 AM   #111
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M.W. View Post
All too true -- but what a price to pay. Simply unthinkable.

An excellent documentary on the tragic destruction of mighty Penn.



At least Germany and SF have an excuse for their losses -- wars of annihilation and earthquakes. But in New York, there is no justification for these tragedies.
Ken Burns, The City and the World, Part of my favorite documentary series
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Old June 17th, 2013, 03:58 AM   #112
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I believe Jane Jacobs was involved in the Penn Station preservation campaign. Too bad she was busy protecting a neighborhood that fell to hippies, or already were by the more P. C. term "beatniks," several years later. Many people give Robert Moses a lot of flack for "destroying" NYC, which is true in a lot of residential neighborhoods, but the Uris Brothers and their Emery Roth & Sons boxes ruined so much of Manhattan.

Park Avenue circa 1930s:

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_TFSGsRRvCP...ark+Avenue.jpg

Park Avenue today:

http://s3.amazonaws.com/data.tumblr....ato4L5M%3D#_=_

I used to be optimistic about NYC someday coming back, constructing on par with what's going up in China, and hopefully making something better to replace 1950-60s mistakes. After seeing 425 and 432 Park Avenue, I realize it's only going to get worse.

Last edited by RegentHouse; June 17th, 2013 at 04:10 AM.
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Old June 17th, 2013, 06:05 AM   #113
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Galro View Post
Another classic American re-clad:

The Nasby Building in Toledo, Ohio. Completed in 1895 to a design by Edward Fallis.

Original 1895 appearance:

Source: http://www.shorpy.com/image/tid/297

The dome was removed during the '30s, while the whole building was later covered in metal plates in 1964. After new look:

Source: http://wikimapia.org/showphoto/?obj=...g=0&id=1983625

This link should lead you do a short resumé of the building:
http://books.google.no/books?id=Ri7A...toledo&f=false

At streetview: https://maps.google.no/maps?q=Madiso...8.11,,0,-23.14

This is just sad. I wonder how much under the 60s era cladding is intact and if it could be restored in the future.
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Old June 17th, 2013, 07:36 AM   #114
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M.W. View Post
All too true -- but what a price to pay. Simply unthinkable.

An excellent documentary on the tragic destruction of mighty Penn.



At least Germany and SF have an excuse for their losses -- wars of annihilation and earthquakes. But in New York, there is no justification for these tragedies.
I agree completely. Pointless destruction of an architectural masterwork.

My parents and grandparents loved it - it was one of NY's most beloved buildings.
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Old June 18th, 2013, 12:30 AM   #115
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Flanders hotel, Philadelphia. I simply adore these thin highrises.


Source: http://www.shorpy.com/node/9331

A modern two-storer stands there today:
https://maps.google.no/maps?q=215+Wa...8.95,,0,-12.61
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Old June 18th, 2013, 12:44 AM   #116
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Northwestern Guaranty Loan Building, Minnesota.


Source: http://www.shorpy.com/node/7776

Today:
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=loc:4...4.65,,0,-12.89

Wikipedia article about it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metropo...g_(Minneapolis)
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Old June 18th, 2013, 12:54 AM   #117
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The cotton exchange, New Orleans. From wiki (this is the 1883 building):

Quote:
The Exchange had its 1871 opening in a series of rented rooms in an existing building at Gravier and Carondelet. Although they moved several times, the Exchange would not leave this intersection until its closing in 1964.[5] After constructing and then outgrowing a small building nearby on Gravier, the Exchange built a palatial Second Empire building in 1883 at the northern corner of Gravier and Carondelet, designed by architect S.S. Labouisse. Noted for its lavish interiors, the building soon became a landmark in New Orleans.

However, in 1916, the building was deemed unsafe and planning began for a replacement. World War I and several other factors conspired to delay the construction of the replacement until 1921, and the original plans for an equally-lavish replacement building were scaled back.

The resulting structure was much more modest, modeled after a Renaissance palazzo. The Cotton Exchange occupied this building until its 1964 closure, selling the building in 1962 and merely renting space for the last two years of operation.

Today, the building is a hotel in the New Orleans Central Business District. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1977,[2][7] and has been named a National Historic Landmark.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Orl...otton_Exchange


Source: http://www.shorpy.com/node/11056

Today: https://maps.google.com/maps?q=loc:2...94.08,,0,-25.5

A okay building by all means, but not up to quite the same standard as the one pictured here.
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Old June 18th, 2013, 01:21 AM   #118
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The Wabash station in Pittsburgh. Info from wiki:

Quote:
The Wabash Pittsburgh Terminal was a railroad station located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. Constructed in 1903 and opened on April 13, 1904, the 11 floor Beaux-Arts domed 197 foot tall terminal was designed by Theodore Carl Link and cost George Jay Gould $800,000 ($20.4 million in 2013 dollars). Floors 1 through 3 contained ticketing, passenger waiting areas and some retail with floors 4 and above serving hundreds of offices of Gould's Wabash Railway Corporation. The The terminal lasted only four years as a station when the Wabash Pittsburgh Terminal Railway entered receivership on May 29, 1908. It continued to service passenger traffic until October 31, 1931, but survived beyond that as an office building and freight-only facility. The adjacent freight warehouse was closed after two successive fires on March 6, and March 22, 1946 destroyed most of the infrastructure[1]. The station was announced for demolition on July 5, 1953 to make way for the Gateway Center complex. with demolition starting on October 5, 1953 and completed in early 1954.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wabash_Pittsburgh_Terminal


Source: http://www.shorpy.com/node/11177

Today: https://maps.google.com/maps?q=loc:4...2.22,,0,-26.81
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Old June 19th, 2013, 06:53 AM   #119
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This small, stout brick Art Deco building was the A D Williams Clinic at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, VA


image hosted on flickr


It was torn down and replaced with a relatively handsome structure designed by Pei Cobb Freed & Partners:



The real tragedy, however, is that the A.D. Williams Clinic's big brother, The West Hospital is also slated for demolition in the near future:



image hosted on flickr
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Last edited by 540_804; June 25th, 2013 at 04:31 AM.
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Old June 19th, 2013, 10:51 AM   #120
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^ Why the heck would they tear down such a wonderful Art Deco gem?

What's supposed to replace it? Any counter-movement organizing?
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