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Old February 1st, 2014, 01:19 AM   #541
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I don't think that the architects at that time wanted people to feel oppressed why would they do that
I'm sure commie block neighborhoods made people feel like they were in a grey hell. This is what I was getting at.

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Old February 1st, 2014, 01:30 AM   #542
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I have no doubts current architecture is better that the one during communism. However, it seems to me a little more attention could of been shown to use of materials and greenery. I'm not saying anything you've posted is bad, just that it could of been better.

As for the pictures you've posted, they do look cold but it may be solely because it is winter time. I wonder how it looks when trees become green. The second picture doesn't even have greenery. If you ask me, it is always a mistake.
Famous cities like Athens and Paris are very un-green and yet people seem to be ok with them. Warsaw for example is one of the greenest capitol cities in Europe.

Look at your own city first before judging.

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Old February 1st, 2014, 02:02 AM   #543
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I'm not judging nor comparing. No need to take it so personal when it is a quite friendly remark.
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Old February 1st, 2014, 03:05 AM   #544
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I'm sure commie block neighborhoods made people feel like they were in a grey hell. This is what I was getting at.
They saw these buildings as the way of the future, and of a better way of unifying the people and providing housing. They didn't know it would go wrong. Nobody intentionally builds to oppress people.
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Old February 1st, 2014, 04:31 AM   #545
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I'm not judging nor comparing. No need to take it so personal when it is a quite friendly remark.
I know.
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Old February 1st, 2014, 07:20 AM   #546
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illuminat: I don't think that the architects at that time wanted people to feel oppressed why would they do that Of course socrealism supposed to be impressive but in a way understandable to the common man, at least in theory. Anyway for a "warm" example you chose Murano complex, probably inspired by stalinist architecture so it's kinda contradicting
there is a difference between socreal and modernism or rather what was in most cases cheap unadorned pre-fab or slab constructed multi-story residential buildings. socreal was a continuation of pre-war traditions both in design and plan as it was street-related, contextual and the detailing was essentially classically based. it reinforced the traditional city which worked while the modernists, which I think rychlik may be referring to, creating largely bleak, sterile districts with little sense of community, did not reinforce the public realm in any way, on the contrary eroded it. it was very bleak and it failed, environmental psychologists almost unanimously concur that blank unadorned sheer walls produce anxiety and fear in people, measuring how the hippocampus in the brain changes when people are in such environments. even people who like this style have the same unconscious reaction. It's these buildings that still make so many neighbourhoods in Polish cities so bleak and alienating.
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Old February 1st, 2014, 07:41 AM   #547
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Couldn't have said it better myself.
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Old February 1st, 2014, 10:14 PM   #548
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there is a difference between socreal and modernism
I'm aware of that but only socreal had totalitarian communist ideology behind it. Im case of Poland socreal was largely infuenced by modernizm btw which can be seen both in urbanism (usually free standing buildings facing the street but already keeping some distance from it) and very moderate use of details.

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contextual and the detailing was essentially classically based. it reinforced the traditional city which worked while the modernists, which I think rychlik may be referring to, creating largely bleak, sterile districts with little sense of community, did not reinforce the public realm in any way, on the contrary eroded it. it was very bleak and it failed, environmental psychologists almost unanimously concur that blank unadorned sheer walls produce anxiety and fear in people, measuring how the hippocampus in the brain changes when people are in such environments. even people who like this style have the same unconscious reaction. It's these buildings that still make so many neighbourhoods in Polish cities so bleak and alienating.
Wish James Randi had more interest in architecture because that some heavy pseudoscientific crap to debunk here I don't even know where to start... Anyway modernism didn't really failed in Poland commieblock districts are doing fine and it would be hard to find a normal person complaining about the lack of traditional streets etc. on the contrary there were many protests regarding new construction that would block sunlight and you often hear people complaining about "looking in neighbours windows" something rather normal in traditional planning along with high density which is also something undesired here so I think it's fair to say Poles are quite happy with modernist planning.

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They saw these buildings as the way of the future, and of a better way of unifying the people and providing housing.
In Poland it was a huge inprovement in living standards that even before the war lived in very unhealthy conditions often badly lit, overcroded, without bathrooms, central heating not to even mention things like gardens or fire safety.

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Old February 2nd, 2014, 02:28 AM   #549
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urbanista1 View Post
there is a difference between socreal and modernism or rather what was in most cases cheap unadorned pre-fab or slab constructed multi-story residential buildings. socreal was a continuation of pre-war traditions both in design and plan as it was street-related, contextual and the detailing was essentially classically based. it reinforced the traditional city which worked while the modernists, which I think rychlik may be referring to, creating largely bleak, sterile districts with little sense of community, did not reinforce the public realm in any way, on the contrary eroded it. it was very bleak and it failed, environmental psychologists almost unanimously concur that blank unadorned sheer walls produce anxiety and fear in people, measuring how the hippocampus in the brain changes when people are in such environments. even people who like this style have the same unconscious reaction. It's these buildings that still make so many neighbourhoods in Polish cities so bleak and alienating.
Can you point to some studies which look into the effects of various architectrues and urbanism patherns on human psychology?
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Old February 2nd, 2014, 07:33 AM   #550
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Yes I agree Polish living standards did improve during the communist occupation and maybe Poland would have gone in that direction post war, but Poland should have been free to choose that. The problem is now that people have gotten used to this way of living in block towers, not that all of them are bad per se, but they do not create cities, they do not build the dynamic spaces that define cities. You can design traditional cities to avoid the privacy, lack of light, noise and pollution issues that modernists sought ot resolve through their new approach, but without destroying the public realm. You can't tell me that Za Zelazna Brama is much merit as an urban community, maybe as a stand alone, it can be blended in, but do you want to repeat this typology over and over - it has been a proven failure. People donm't dream about visiting Za Zelazna Brama, they dream about Europe's old towns, because they are human-scaled, warm, rich with details and define streets and squares that brim with life.

Of course there are some very good examples of modernism in Poland produced post war and in the interwar period by the Praesens group, especially Szymon Syrkus. I could imagine living in some of their communities, but their scale and attention to detail distinguished them and they could co-exist with more traditional forms of urbanism.

Beograd, I've read a fair bit on the subject of env psychology as the basis for what I do. Beograd, look up Paul Zak, who's done lots of writing, also Carol Ryff and of course the pioneers William Whyte and Jan Gehl.
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Old February 2nd, 2014, 08:26 AM   #551
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People donm't dream about visiting Za Zelazna Brama, they dream about Europe's old towns, because they are human-scaled, warm, rich with details and define streets and squares that brim with life.

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Old February 2nd, 2014, 08:31 PM   #552
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Oh my God, very nice upscale architectural designs in Poland.
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Old February 3rd, 2014, 01:46 AM   #553
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Beograd, I've read a fair bit on the subject of env psychology as the basis for what I do. Beograd, look up Paul Zak, who's done lots of writing, also Carol Ryff and of course the pioneers William Whyte and Jan Gehl.
Tnx. Will check it out. This topic does interest me.
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Old February 23rd, 2014, 04:18 AM   #554
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Wroclaw
Blue House
Architect: Dariusz Ropacki


image hosted on flickr

Blue House by Maciek Lulko, on Flickr


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Blue House by Maciek Lulko, on Flickr
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Old February 23rd, 2014, 11:04 PM   #555
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Warsaw


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Old February 23rd, 2014, 11:05 PM   #556
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Rzeszow

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Old February 23rd, 2014, 11:07 PM   #557
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Old February 23rd, 2014, 11:32 PM   #558
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Wroclaw
Blue House
Architect: Dariusz Ropacki
I don't think this one in particular could be considered an achievement in polish modern architecture ... it looks unbeliveably ugly in my opinion
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Old February 24th, 2014, 01:19 AM   #559
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Wrocław is known from many postmodern experiments that went horribly wrong. I think some of them will be demolished soon like this infamous Solpol building.
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Old February 26th, 2014, 05:14 AM   #560
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Katowice



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