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Old January 1st, 2016, 08:06 AM   #641
CNB30
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Glad to see Bedford and More of the Upper West Side on there: Now on to Lower Park Slope, Yorkville, and the LES
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Old January 1st, 2016, 08:15 PM   #642
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The worry with New York, is that the precedent set by the demolition of the gorgeous Drake Hotel suggests that there is very little that is 'off limits' beyond the true landmarks. In other words, nothing is safe. Though heritage battles go on in London it appears that New York is far less protective of its architectural gems than comparable cities.
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Is it not cruel to let our city die by degrees, stripped of all her proud monuments, until there will be nothing left of all her history and beauty to inspire our children? If they are not inspired by the past of our city, where will they find the strength to fight for her future? Americans care about their past, but for short term gain they ignore it and tear down everything that matters... This is the time to take a stand, to reverse the tide, so that we won't all end up in a uniform world of steel and glass boxes.

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Old January 2nd, 2016, 07:40 AM   #643
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Indeed and the cost of this can't even be expressed in numbers or anything. NYC will continue to expand and it might be exponential, but when it happens at the expense of valuable historical structures there also is a great loss. Yeah, Rio de Janeiro and HongKong have been growing a lot throughout the century, but with the gains came a heavy barge of architectural losses. I'd have preferred if these cities were growing more sensible to their history, just as NYC should. The layers are already somewhat hard to read today.

Precisely what I pity the most about today's Midtown, the loss of such a cityscape - it should have been preserved in such specific areas, other non-descript tenement areas would have offered much more options for modern skyscraper development:

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnDee View Post


This is what I was talking about. Not Hells Kitchen tenements. These old beautiful unbroken streets of ornate mansions/houses in midtown. Very Mayfair/Kensington. These were replaced by blander and taller structures that could have been built in less salubrious/aesthetically interesting areas if they had any interest in this kind of thing. Commerce won out in the end.
This was amazing and in its ornateness, dignity and metropolitan flair quite unique even to the historical old colonial states on the American East Coast.
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Old January 3rd, 2016, 04:23 AM   #644
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Hell's Kitchen styled Victorian Apartments are still insanely Beautiful (and on par with many Art Deco buildings in Midtown). Considering that so many of a similar design were destroyed (for High Rises, and Title one projects), I would argue that they need to be protected.





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Old January 3rd, 2016, 04:52 AM   #645
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Old January 3rd, 2016, 01:04 PM   #646
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CNB30: I agree such buildings are worthy of protection. At least their facades most probably are. If the pressure on development gets insanely high in the future there, I'd be fine with some facadism as well. If there's a valuable (mostly original) interior though, that should also be kept.

There are also various non-descript bland tenement lowrises though, especially from interwar and post-war periods, that could very well get replaced without much hesitation, like the one to the left here:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-X...640-Ic42/2.jpg
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Old January 4th, 2016, 01:19 AM   #647
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erbse View Post
CNB30: I agree such buildings are worthy of protection. At least their facades most probably are. If the pressure on development gets insanely high in the future there, I'd be fine with some facadism as well. If there's a valuable (mostly original) interior though, that should also be kept.

There are also various non-descript bland tenement lowrises though, especially from interwar and post-war periods, that could very well get replaced without much hesitation, like the one to the left here:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-X...640-Ic42/2.jpg
I BEG to differ. Having looked a lot around the neighborhood a few days ago, I would argue that the vast majority of buildings there are pre-war and Victorian, and mostly intact
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Old February 1st, 2016, 08:57 PM   #648
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YIMBY: Mixed-Use Rehabilitation Underway At Five-Story Building At 721 St. Nicholas Avenue, Hamilton Heights

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In 2012, the Landmarks Preservation Commission twice rejected redevelopment plans for the long-vacant five-story residential building at 721 St. Nicholas Avenue, located on the corner of West 146th Street in the Hamilton Heights section of Harlem. The property sits within the Hamilton Heights/Sugar Hill Historic District, which means building alterations require LPC approval. Harlem+Bespoke now reports a gut-renovation, without the expansion, is underway to transform the building into retail space and four residential units.
[...]
the building in 2011, photo by Matthew X. Kiernan


713–21 St. Nicholas Ave., Hamilton Heights by Matthew X. Kiernan, on Flickr
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Old March 15th, 2016, 02:21 AM   #649
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Five-Story, 78-Unit Residential Conversion Underway At 525 West 145th Street, Hamilton Heights

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Old March 18th, 2016, 07:23 PM   #650
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I'm really fond of the idea of posting NYC revitalization projects and renovations here, keep them coming!


This dialogue could have happened within this thread's realm as well:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philly Bud View Post
I am older than most of the posters here and you would think I would be the one nostalgic for the old masonry Art Deco skyscrapers of the early 20th Century.

I am not.

We are living in the 21st Century and building technology ... and costs ... are different today then they were 85 years ago. Our aesthetic has evolved as well.

Remember: traditionalists in Paris were outraged when the Eiffel Tower was built. Architecture critics were appalled when the Monadnock Block was built in Chicago.

New York City is NOT a living history museum - like Colonial Williamsburg - frozen in the mid 20th Century.
Quote:
Originally Posted by SMCYB View Post
Your opinion is just as valid (no more, no less) than anyone of any age with any measurable amount of knowledge of the history of architecture. I don't say that to be demeaning in any way... just to point out that all opinions matter as long as they are informed.

Our aesthetic (speaking of the meaning of the word in terms of the opinions of the masses as a whole) generally changes as a result of those with the means and wherewithal to build new buildings and thus have an influence over the opinions of those who don't have such means. Thought leaders are often those with the ability to produce, and producing large buildings takes a lot of money. So there are only a few who have the ability to do so, resulting in a handful of people being the ones who put their works out there visibly to the public.

I personally wish we had more classical architecture in this modern age, not less, and I too am probably older than most of the posters here.
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...#post131369782
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Old April 15th, 2016, 10:18 AM   #651
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New York, you can be so freckin' depressing!

Demolition of 68 Trinity Place (Trinity Court Building, 1927, 114m/25 floors):


http://www.nyc-architecture.com


@tectonicphoto on Twitter & Instagram; NEW YORK | 68 Trinity Place | 152m | 499ft | 44 fl | Demo


http://newyorkyimby.com

See also:
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...554136&page=10

And this is the nondescript, bland, exchangeable and disharmonic glassy shite we get for the lost marvel:


http://newyorkyimby.com/2014/09/perm...44-floors.html

Seriously. WTF.

Though at least there was one much more fitting and interesting design for the Trinity Church neighborhood, but of course they go for the much worse: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...hp?p=105608165

Later they announced they might just go for 25 storeys, meaning they could have just saved the building... Jeez!
A total fail by the Landmark Preservation Commission and the Trinity Church. It's unbelievable. Read this, you'll be "enlightened" for sure.
THE CHURCH DOES THIS!


Let them greedy "clerics" know what you think about this:

[email protected]

www.trinitywallstreet.org


And the LPC in charge of NYC landmarks as well: http://www.nyc.gov/html/lpc/html/contact/contact.shtml
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Old April 15th, 2016, 11:30 AM   #652
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Okay, don't exaggarate, the new building is fairly good per se.
However, it is indeed a great shame putting it right there! The square around the church forms such a nice old Art Deco environment, I can't believe it was allowed to take one of these beauties down.
And there's plenty of opportunity for a new development just behind the street: https://www.google.at/maps/@40.70794...8i6656!6m1!1e1
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Old April 19th, 2016, 01:06 PM   #653
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^ That's the whole point! Context is everything in architecture. And NYC constantly negates that and thus turns more and more disharmonic and visually unappealing as we speak. There's a reason why 1930s vistas of Manhattan are so fascinating to us, 'Gotham' calling.

Not saying they shouldn't continue to build and in different styles, but everything should have its place. Trinity Church's surroundings was one of the few places in Manhattan where you could still get a feel of grand ol' New York. This is what they're destroying now, shamelessly. The church!

It's exactly these rather unknown seemingly "unimportant" buildings that still have a great impact on the cityscape, which make the fabric of Manhattan. Which make the place so unique and valuable... Or used to made, as more and more of this is vanishing. I agree here:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tellvis View Post
Apologies but I beg to disagree, these are the type of buildings that for me typify New York. It may not be the best example of NYC Art Deco and it may not have any historic merit, it may not be important and I don't care if it's uptown, downtown or mid town, it's a beautiful building and to demolish it 10 odd years short of it's centenary is cruel. I love New York with a passion and it hurts to see the fabric of New York slowly eroded.

Alas, we have the same problem here in London. We have plenty of historic and protected buildings but we are gradually losing the old 'pretty but unimportant' buildings, the buildings that have to particular merit but buildings that form the fabric of London. Redeveloped under the 'progress banner'.
But I guess someone is getting wealthy redeveloping this site and it's difficult to fight the developers on so many fronts. Very sad. A tale of two cities.
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...41146&page=320
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Old April 21st, 2016, 01:43 AM   #654
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erbse View Post
^ That's the whole point! Context is everything in architecture. And NYC constantly negates that and thus turns more and more disharmonic and visually unappealing as we speak. There's a reason why 1930s vistas of Manhattan are so fascinating to us, 'Gotham' calling.

Not saying they shouldn't continue to build and in different styles, but everything should have its place. Trinity Church's surroundings was one of the few places in Manhattan where you could still get a feel of grand ol' New York. This is what they're destroying now, shamelessly. The church!

It's exactly these rather unknown seemingly "unimportant" buildings that still have a great impact on the cityscape, which make the fabric of Manhattan. Which make the place so unique and valuable... Or used to made, as more and more of this is vanishing. I agree here:

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...41146&page=320
I completely agree with you. When I first saw N.Y.C back in the late 60's it still retained that very special New York look despite the destruction in the previous decade. Now there are glass and steel boxes going up everywhere that could be in Dubai, Singapore or Sydney. Of course the city cannot stand still but there are many nondescript buildings that could be demolished for new development rather than quality structures of the pre WW2 period. I used to love the area around Grand Central when it retained it;s early 20th c feel. Now that both the Biltmore and Commodore (re-clad in glass of course) have gone it's lost it's unique "This could only be New York" look forever. I "love" New York, yeah, and sometimes I hate it!
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Old April 21st, 2016, 02:21 AM   #655
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Our societies are richer and more technical advanced than ever, yet our architecture have been reduced to mere blank glass walls. It's embarrassing to look at scheduled replacement for the Trinity Court Building. It beggars belief that a grown up person with access to all known information at his/her fingertips can not come up with something more imaginative.
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Old April 21st, 2016, 04:46 AM   #656
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That's exactly what I've tried to do in the past, and created a few buildings of my own, I love looking into all the different designs of older buildings, and then coming up with my own ideas! I'm actually attending architecture school soon, and while I plan to do a lot of work with modern designs (I do appreciate a lot of contemporary work, and after all part of the issue is that curriculum is currently based around simply doing whatever is modern). However, I hope to work on developing my own great style which will awe people in the way I'm assuming you wish architecture will.
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Old April 21st, 2016, 11:51 PM   #657
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I wish you good luck. I'm working towards becoming an architect too. I dream of designing high quality, human-scaled buildings that becomes highly regarded by their communities, but I fear there is a severe lack of developers that are willing to spend money on expensive architecture. Still it's worth a fight. I will get seriously depressed if architecture just continues down the current path of (mostly) cheap, box-like apartment buildings and boring glass-clad office towers.
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Old April 22nd, 2016, 05:05 AM   #658
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The argument that 'a city shouldn't stand still' is such a lazy one when spouted by modernists. It feels as though architecture must have stood still if we still can't develop something complementary but distinctly new for historical areas and instead stick to the same bland glass walls. Variety is important and there has to be something new to fill that space whilst these glass buildings are built elsewhere.

It feels as though a lot of European cities are desperately trying to save their old buildings because they know that when they're in ruins the replacements won't be of similar quality, or of anything approaching a similar style. That wasn't always the case and it's depressing.

There needs to be a grouping together of artists and architects to create something entirely new. Would be interesting to see digital artists working on sculptures for buildings as well, considering the new technologies, as long as its a style of architecture with a clear architectural language and not just a tower wrapped in a **** ton of sculptures like that New York skyscraper concept.
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Old May 19th, 2016, 10:29 PM   #659
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Another case where a recognizable and interesting historical building (that would likely be turned into amazing lofts or something in a place like London or Berlin), had to make way for some random tower:

685 First Ave / former site of Con Ed Waterside Plant

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarshallKnight View Post
Per Curbed today, Sheldon Solow has submitted an application for a 42-story mixed user on a piece of the former Con-Ed megadevelopment.






----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Con Ed demolition, 2006


Demolition of ConEdison's Waterside Generating Station, NYC by Sarah Chamberlain, on Flickr


Demolition of ConEdison's Waterside Generating Station, NYC by Sarah Chamberlain, on Flickr


Demolition of ConEdison's Waterside Generating Station, NYC by Sarah Chamberlain, on Flickr



Con Ed Waterside Plant


http://www.mas.org/category/east-sid...t-park/page/2/


Previously:

Empire Built by Developer Shows Signs of Distress

And this is what we get: A freaking black box!


http://www.wsj.com/articles/architec...wer-1463608586


Must be the worst "design" ever by Richard Meier. Usually I tend to like his concepts.
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Old May 19th, 2016, 10:38 PM   #660
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That picture also shows how remarkdable stale a lot of modernistic architecture have become despite their usual outspoken claims to embrace the new and being against copying past styles. That building could easily have passed as something from the '60s without issues.
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