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Old November 2nd, 2012, 12:01 PM   #21
Pablo Diablo
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Originally Posted by Tom Hughes View Post
I've been criticised before for stating exactly this. Not every city can utilise trams effectively, and not every city-centre can maximise their benefits either..... their street layout simply doesn't lend itself to them easily. I sat in quite a few meetings discussing various routing and other design concerns for merseytram..... and this came up time and time again. City-centre planners want any new public transit to cover all areas of the centre, and if possible open up new ones, and they want this movement to be rapid..... as city-centres expand, access and "last-mile" factor become increasingly important, as passengers expect greater speed and efficiency.
Maybe it's time to seriously look at whether the Wapping and Waterloo tunnels can be used as part of a tram-train network?

I'm thinking something like street/reservation running tram in the eastern suburbs (West Derby Road, Muirhead Ave, Utting Ave, Menlove Ave, East Prescot Road etc), tram-trains along the Canada dock line and maybe the WCML to South Parkway (if there's capacity on the slow lines) all combining at Edge Hill into the two tunnels and, more far-fetched, onto a rebuilt LOR running between the Tobacco Warehouse (via Liverpool Waters) and Festival Gardens.
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Old November 2nd, 2012, 01:09 PM   #22
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Liverpool's Future: The Next 15 Years

What happens when you've rebuilt the city centre, and you've run out of money? Joe Anderson presents his vision for the next fifteen years, and joins up the dots.

Link: Seven Streets


The future starts here. Today, Joe Anderson, together with Liverpool Vision chief Max Steinberg, release the details of the city’s new Strategic Investment Framework (SIF): the big ideas set to take the city forward for the next 15 years.

To cut to the chase, if the last decade-and-a-bit was all about shiny new buildings, the next one is about joining them all together, and creating a city that’s easier to live in, and easier to love.

It’s regeneration, but with a softer edge. Less ‘big ticket’, more ‘little details’. It’s green spaces, open squares, pedestrianised streets and distinctive neighbourhoods. And, as far as SevenStreets is concerned, it’s a well-thought-out, optimistic and inclusive approach that joins the top of the city (the ‘Knowledge Quarter’ and Georgian Liverpool) with Hope Street, Lime Street with Liverpool ONE, and The Strand to the city.

It creates huge new, European-style piazzas, restricts the bus-clogged artery of Dale Street, and – finally – brings the Baltic home.

It’s no secret that Anderson’s identified a key selection of sectors ripe for driving the city’s economic growth. These, wherever they pop up in the city, are squarely in the Mayor’s crosshairs. Financial and Business Services, Life Sciences, Creative and Digital and Culture and Tourism.





Key Projects

When it comes to changing the shape of the city, don’t expect any Liverpool Two’s or new skyscrapers punching the air. Instead, expect to see cosmetic changes concerned with interconnecting, and joining up the dots.

Waterfront

With movement along the Waterfront interrupted by a combination of incomplete links (between the Albert Dock and Mann Island for instance) the gaps will be closed, new pathways created between the ACC and the Museum of Liverpool, and an ‘all seasons’ route built (whatever that is). Increased use of the water will be encouraged, with an ‘extreme sports’ facility.

The Migration Centre and the new Exhibition Centre are the main additions – together with a permanent home for the cruise turnaround facility.

What’s less clear is when the SIF goes into dream mode, with airy talk of vacant office space in the three graces: “The buildings will be assured a long term viable future and their surroundings will be animated by achieving full occupation, whether for office use as part of the city’s offer of exceptional refurbished floor space in the World Heritage Site located buildings.”

Yes? How? It’s short on details when it comes to stuff like this.

St George’s

The SIF is at its most radical when it arrives at St George’s Plateau – aiming for nothing less than ‘Liverpool’s Trafalgar Square’. And we can really see this happening. A new signature space for our city’s main muster station.

There’s talk of ‘de-engineering’ the highway network, giving the streets back to the people. It’s a horrible word, but its aim is true: of making the space between Lime Street station and St George’s hall a huge, open city square.

The flyovers will be removed at Hunter Street, and the walls to St John’s Gardens will be taken down, allowing the gardens to spill out onto William Brown Street, and run up to the steps of our refurbished library (with new external exhibition spaces at the rear) and World Museum.





Central

The Central project will create strong links between Lime Street and Church Street, and embed the new Central Village squarely at the heart of a re-energised city centre.

The project will ‘tie in’ key assets including the Cavern Quarter, Met Quarter, St John’s Centre, Clayton Square and Bold Street into a retail offer that, they say, will focus on independent retail, higher quality outlets and buildings. Again, how that’s going to happen, when Merepark has already seen the loss of independent tenants on Bold Street is anyone’s guess.

Williamson Square will lose the ugly building that’s currently home to the LFC store, and a largely pedestrian-friendly Dale Street will link in to the Met Quarter and Cavern Walks.

Knowledge Quarter

With LJMU transforming the old sorting office into a gateway building for the city’s learning zones, and investment in Brownlow Hill and Mount Pleasant, the journey between city centre and Knowledge Hill should be a more inspirational one for our lovely students. A new bio-campus and science park will further boost the city’s excellent life sciences research.

There’s even going to be a Knowledge Quarter Gateway adjacent to the Adelphi, a ‘cafe culture’ within the quarter, to encourage people to ‘mix and exchange ideas’ (and we guess that’s why they’re extending the School of Tropical Medicine, too, for those awkward post-exchange moments), public realm investment and provision of ‘green infrastructure’ will create ‘memorable journeys and spaces’. Students eh.





Commercial District

Now largely centred on Old Hall Street and St. Paul’s Square, the Commercial District will see improved links between it and the cluster of offices on Princes dock with a massive super-crossing – and there’s an entirely new district of the city, too. Pumpfields. Sounds a bit filthy, is in fact the area around Pall Mall, ripe for redevelopment. If there are any takers.

Great Streets

The city’s main routes from the top of town to the waterfront will be getting Nicky Hambleton Jones and a team of cosmetic surgeons in to give them a spruce up like they’ve never seen. From Hope Street to Dale Street, Lime Street to The Strand, pop-up parklets, pedestrian rights of way, cycle lanes and recycled seating will create an axis from head to heart (if Knowledge is head and the UNESCO bit is heart. Work with us on this one…).

Honestly, it’s gonna be like Silent Running. Street trees, green roofs and ‘productive landscapes’ will mingle with public realm improvements. The Strand will see teeny breathing spaces in the middle of the road: bushes and benches which form pedestrian ‘bridges’ – major landscape interventions, greening this – let’s face it – hard to love dual carriageway.

Water Street, Dale Street and Lime Street will see major pedestrian-friendly intrusions, new public squares (such as at Cheapside/Dale Street and Moorfields) will create breathing spaces, and walking and cycling will replace public transport and cars as the primary focus for movement. The provision for busses, boldly, will be subservient to these aims. Three cheers for that. Dale Street has become an embarrassment for the city – and a paycheck for Arriva. West Moorfields (the derelict land behind Turning the Place Over) is earmarked for a new development, too.

There’s similar shuffling around of priorities in Hope Street too, with a rabid keenness for us all to rediscover St James Gardens – like we want to hang with EMOs.

The Distinctive Neighbourhoods

Underpinning the city’s economic ambitions, Anderson’s keen to focus on creating a more diverse residential population (he’d better keep an eye out for the rising epidemic of private student halls then), including the provision of housing for families as well as for young and older people. He’s identified six key areas:

The Waterfront
Ropewalks
Baltic Triangle
Canning/Georgian Quarter
Marybone
Downtown
Islington

They’re all offered a similar mix of promotional activity, to be led by the Community Interest Companies, private sector stakeholders, co-ordinated neighbourhood approaches and ‘infestation’ by small businesses.

In Downtown “the prestige and glamour of Victoria and Dale Streets can be brought back to this area once more… revitalising the streets and spaces and reinvigorating the historic heart of Liverpool.” It’s short on detail as to how, exactly this will be achieved. Closing Kingdom might be a start.

The Ropewalks is a place to “attract young indies, city breakers, students, and creative and cultural businesses…”. Has anyone told Cllr Munby? Or is no-one speaking to him these days?

“It needs to attract more investment and development activity, to accommodate more creative and digital businesses, apartments, and cultural attractions…” it says, adding “Duke Street should be transformed into a thriving city street linking Liverpool One and the Waterfront to the Anglican Cathedral.”

We think this is a bit rich, bearing in mind the troubles this area has seen of late. Mostly due to the Council’s poor process. “A creative vision is needed,” the framework says. Yes, we know. Let us get on with it.

In the Georgian Quarter, get this, “property owners should be encouraged to convert apartments back to single dwellings, and to restore buildings to their former glory”

There truly is nothing new under the sun.

“The Quarter needs a clear vision and plan, engaging with local communities, which enable the registered social providers to buy into a phased regeneration of their stock to open up the area to a more balanced neighbourhood..” it continues in a freeform, arm-wavy kind of way.

The new Framework will, it’s hoped, create a city that’s attractive for visitors, residents and businesses, and a greener, more sustainable city centre.

When it drills down to details it’s encouraging: we approve of the radical overhaul of our streets, of stopping the reliance on busses in the city centre, and of our continued investment in our cultural and knowledge quarters. We’re great at that.

Much of the SIF is vague though – more a wish list than an action plan. There is no clear understanding of where the money will come from. Much of it reads like a letter to the cosmos. But when you’ve no money, whether you’re Mayor of Liverpool or shopping on Amazon, it’s good to have a wish list. It’s a start – a call to arms, and a statement of intent.

There is much to be done. As our feature the other week showed, Liverpool has millions of square feet of empty buildings. And relatively empty pockets.

As the SIF document says, this is merely the next 15 years. It’s not the end of the story. We’ve a long way to travel yet. Good job we’ve got plenty of public realm seating to rest our weary legs on the way.
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Old November 2nd, 2012, 10:35 PM   #23
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I've only just started reading this report but the new idea that appeals the most to me is the concept of the 'Great Streets', which seems a new departure for city centre planning which normally focusses on 'areas' and 'quarters'.

A couple of weeks ago, I was in Madrid and what stuck in my imagination was the Gran Via, a long street lined by tall office buildings with shopping at ground level. Some of the buildings were practically skyscrapers - as if the Liver Buildings had been built fronting onto Dale Street opposite the Municipal Buildings.

The report mentions Las Ramblas in Barcelona, for some reason I have often thought that Renshaw Street, with some traffic calming and improved lighting could look like that.

Another feature of Madrid is the way that they have succeeded in burying some major traffic routes underground. The most spectacular example is the orbital motorway which runs for miles through tunnels while the space above is given over to parkland. However, on a more modest scale, a road fronting onto the Royal Palace has been sunk below ground to allow a large public realm area to be created.

I wonder if something similar could be created in Lime Street and maybe the Strand to achieve the planner's vision's for these areas. I guess the main problem is the existing underground infrastructure that would be expensive and impractical to divert.

The idea of a new station at St James has been around for several years. It does have the advantage of being at the convergence of several routes but it is relatively distant from Chinatown. Certainly it would be cheaper to construct than one on the underground line near Nelson Street but what will be needed will be a system of access passages to remove the need to cross busy roads.

Anyway, it is good to see some of these new ideas. I think Seven Streets should bear in mind just what has been achieved in the past ten years.
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Old November 2nd, 2012, 11:31 PM   #24
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Seven Streets is full of moaners. Like when our population increased for the first time since 1951 (I dont include 1931-1950 due to the war) they were moaning that Manchester had increased more and went on a tangent about companies moving to MediaCity.
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Old November 3rd, 2012, 04:40 AM   #25
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Excited

I have not read all the detail but as someone who plans to return to live in the city centre (at least part time) during the next 15 years I thought it very good . Ambitious but deliverable and well thought out connected thinking.

Congratulations to those involved in putting this together.


Lets make it happen!

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Old November 3rd, 2012, 10:13 AM   #26
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I've only had a chance to browse through it so far, but it looks quite exciting. I'm a little bit wary of traffic calming measures per se along Lime street, Renshaw street......... Berry Street etc. Any traffic-calming has to be taken into context with the whole city-centre. We still need effective traffic movement too, and this corridor is an important one. The cross-town routes are few and far between already, and this is already fragmented, slightly tortuous and consequently often congested. I've often thought that the topography of the Lime street/Roe Street Junction lent itself towards burying the traffic along Lime street allowing greater/easier pedestrian flow between the station and St Johns. This could also allow a complete reinvention of Lime street between The Grapes and The Big House. If the road was to remain with surface traffic along this length I think they should consider clearing the western side and even widening slightly for better flow and wider pavement areas too. Pedestrianisation would help to prompt the bulking up of the Clayton Sqr/Lime street/Central-village offer. The ease of access and pedestrian movement is essential, but it should also be remembered that if the city centre is going to grow effectively into the surrounding areas.......efficient medium distance people-movement will also need to be a priority, and this might require a dedicated city-centre system. The choking of major bus routes via traffic-calming measures might mean that even less of the centre will be covered by buses. With the advent of whole new areas such as Liverpool waters, as well as the existing poorly accessed peripheral city-centre areas....... the existing public transport is going to fall way short. The broadening of the city centre's waterfront will never be served effectively by the existing public transport which radiates from quite a narrow focal point and feeds only a few radial routes through the centre...... In fact the expansion in various directions will leave several public transport blind spots. I'm interested in Martin's point about the focus on "street" as opposed to "Quarters"...... I think the concept of Quarters concerns the grouping of related amenities/attractions to provide a "destination" whereas Streets can be both a destination and a route, they are the arteries and the quarters are the organs if you like. We need the joined up development of both to allow the centre to breath and work efficiently.... that means effective people and traffic movement. In an ideal world, people should be able to reach all parts of the centre via public transport and via seamless interchanges if necessary. I think the centre that really provides this will prosper the most.
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Old November 3rd, 2012, 06:09 PM   #27
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Liverpool Vision reveals 15 year plan for city’s future

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Huge development plans for the city of Liverpool are to be presented to the public today (1 November) at the launch of the City Centre Strategic Investment Framework (SIF).

Developed by Liverpool Vision, in conjunction with a team of regeneration experts led by Drivers Jonas Deloitte, the SIF outlines exciting developments and improvements to key business and residential districts in the city centre. The plans follow in the footsteps of the successful City Centre Strategic Regeneration Framework (SRF), launched in 2001 and are a result of a major consultation exercise with Liverpool’s business community and residents.

The SRF 2001 envisaged Liverpool ONE, The Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool (ACCL), the cruise liner facility, the City Centre Movement Strategy and Lime Street Gateway, as well as suggesting that Liverpool bid to be European Capital of Culture in 2008.

Max Steinberg, chief executive of Liverpool Vision, the city’s economic development agency, said: “The SIF is designed to create a new trajectory for the city through which Liverpool will become a world renowned international trading and cultural location. We have bold plans that play to our strengths and through their careful exploitation we will be an international force to be reckoned with.

“The SIF recommends how physical projects can provide a platform to boost the city, but combined with strategic objectives and a focus on neighbourhoods it aims to ensure that economic and social benefits, job creation and growth can be realised.”

The waterfront regeneration will continue, building on the transformation that started with the creation of ACCL, which is continuing with the construction of a £40m Exhibition Centre extension. The continuous investment to the waterfront area will see a further increase in visitor numbers and spending. Improvement plans include the provision of better access along the dockside through the north-south axis, along with projects to utilise fully the water space, seeing the creation of dedicated sports and leisure areas.

Liverpool ONE has been a major catalyst for retail development and the city will continue to grow, offering an unparalleled shopping experience. The area between Liverpool One and Lime Street is a key focus area and plans will better connect these parts of the city centre and create an improved high quality retail offer. This is designed to complement the investment made in recent years in Liverpool ONE and Church Street.

The Knowledge Quarter is home to an unrivalled concentration of higher education, scientific and medical expertise that generates more than £1bn for Liverpool each year. It has been designated as a Mayoral Development Zone to exploit its economic potential and in the coming years will welcome the universities’ development programmes, expansion of the Liverpool Science Park and a new teaching hospital as part of a 2m sq ft Biocampus.

Proposals for green development recommend that transport links are improved sustainably, with a circular bus route provided to link the Knowledge Quarter with the city centre and Commercial District.

Since the launch of the SRF in 2001, plans to expand the Commercial District around Old Hall Street have largely been realised. The SIF aims to provide additional Grade A office space allowing the city to compete internationally in the provision of high quality commercial space. Over the next decade, the Commercial District will expand into Pall Mall and into Princes Dock.

Hope Street will see a continuation of cultural development, anchored by the city’s two cathedrals, while plans for St George’s Quarter propose an extension of the Plateau, a reworking of St John’s Gardens and a complete reworking of Lime Street /Roe Street bus movement to create a pedestrian priority space.

Residential areas have been highlighted in the ‘Distinctive Neighbourhoods’ section of the SIF where plans to develop contemporary accommodation and vibrant communities have been highlighted. Areas such as Baltic Triangle, Ropewalks and Islington will offer more for young professionals. There are also plans within the SIF for the Canning Georgian Quarter to provide luxury family accommodation, with apartments converted back to single dwellings and their former glory.

The city’s infrastructure has also been earmarked for an overhaul with a focus on improving utilities, transport and the delivery of telecommunication and digital services in the city, alongside improved connections for pedestrians and cyclists between the city centre neighbourhoods.

Bus stations and routes will be made more efficient, with a particular focus on upgrading the efficiency of Queen Square Bus Station. Central and Moorfields train stations could also be developed to cope better with increasing passenger numbers.

Liverpool’s underground travel facilities are also to be assessed further, with proposals for an expansion of this network towards Liverpool Waters and a new station at St James Street, south of Chinatown.

While these major transformational projects focus on investment in specific areas of the city, the SIF also includes directives on Strategic Initiatives focused on festivals, cultural events and programmes of activity to bring the city together.

One particular initiative that demonstrates the scale of Liverpool’s ambition is the International Festival of Business, being held in Liverpool on behalf of the UK in 2014. It is envisaged that this key event will boost the city’s business and trading reputation around the world, just as European Capital of Culture 2008 did for Liverpool’s image and visitor economy.

The planned ‘Lighting-Up’ of Liverpool will see some of the most beautiful buildings and areas illuminated permanently with others included in separate festivals to showcase stunning architecture. Existing events such as Liverpool Sound City, The Arabic Arts Festival and Liverpool Pride will be supported fully to enhance to city’s positive image.

Marketing the city is given prominence in the SIF and the establishment of Marketing Liverpool aims to ensure that news about the city’s resurgence will reach audiences nationally and internationally, to attract further inward investment and foster loyalty from businesses, visitors and residents.

Simon Bedford, partner at Drivers Jonas Deloitte, said: “Liverpool has witnessed a remarkable transformation since the launch of the SRF, illustrated by the award-winning Liverpool ONE, the growth of the Commercial District and the establishment of the Knowledge Quarter.

“The city has accomplished much, but the ambition to go further remains high, and the SIF is the blueprint for the next 15 years of development.”

Joe Anderson, Mayor of Liverpool, said: “Exciting times beckon for Liverpool. The last framework of this kind delivered a high class waterfront, a transformed business district and one of the best cultural and retail offers in the UK.

“We are determined to build on the opportunities these developments have produced and this new framework will further generate important catalysts for the city’s continued economic growth. It is a foundation for progress and will advance Liverpool towards its goal of become one of the world’s greatest cities.”
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Old November 4th, 2012, 06:45 PM   #28
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Bloody great news for Liverpool! I'll be observing with interest. Especially the Merseyrail extensions..
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Old November 8th, 2012, 12:39 PM   #29
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Waterfront redevelopment most important thing for Liverpool, Post online poll reveals

DEVELOPING Liverpool’s waterfront should be the main priority for the city over the next 15 years, a survey commissioned for The Post found.

Just under 35% of the people polled on their reactions to the council’s “strategic investment framework” plan – unveiled last week – said the regeneration of the docklands was the most important element of the ambitious document.

Second most important, at 24%, were the council’s plans for improving the “Great Streets” of The Strand, Hope Street, and the corridor from Lime Street to Water Street along Dale Street.

Overall reaction to the plan was positive from almost 75% of respondents and 77% supported plans which would reduce traffic in the city centre.

But some felt the masterplan had overlooked some key opportunities for investment and growth.

One respondent said London Road should be a priority, while others pointed to the long debated tram system.

“The bus network is creaking and we need many more and properly enforced bus lanes and proper cycle lanes.

“The rail network should be extended to run to Anfield/ Everton football stadia and John Lennon airport. What about revisiting modern light rail or tram links?” asked one who took part in the online poll.

Another wrote: “The situation regarding development of football grounds in the city and in particular Everton FC ground needs addressing. This would lend itself to a rethink of the potential development of the area around the 'white elephant' Custom House on the waterfront.

“It would be beneficial to exploit the soccer village idea which would lead to increased visitors.”

Some warned that they hoped that, in trying to achieve the long-term goals, the council did not “sell our souls for private investment”.

Asked what the city needed to do to bring itself up to the level of some of the other great cities of the world, responses included a “proper Bohemian, left-field area”, but far and away the most common response was better transport links between the city centre and the airport.

Liverpool One was identified as the most significant achievement of the last strategic investment framework, which covered the last 15 years, with 70% choosing the Grosvenor shopping development over the Arena and Convention Centre and the cruise terminal.

Read More http://www.liverpooldailypost.co.uk/...#ixzz2Bd8h3s8W
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Old November 9th, 2012, 11:47 AM   #30
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Quote:
World-leading urban regeneration expert: “Liverpool has assets most cities would die for”
by Marc Waddington, The Liverpool Post | Nov 9 2012

LIVERPOOL has real estate “most cities would die for”, according to a world-leading urban design expert.

Canadian Professor Trevor Boddy, who was in town to deliver a lecture as part of the Cities For People series, said the prime land on the waterfront would be a major draw for the Chinese market if it were developed into residential properties.

Prof Boddy said: “Waterside real estate, I don’t think in global terms you (Liverpool) realise how valuable that is, especially to Asian markets. No-one can compete with it.”

Prof Boddy, whose lecture last night came within a week of Liverpool council launching its 15-year strategic investment framework plan, warned against following “go creative” model, but instead concentrating on proper urban development.

He added: “It’s no good going down the ‘creative city’ route and building recording studios and making it into a hipster town.

“I’ve got nothing against hipsters, but I think that solution has had its day.”

He said that the development of the waterfront should have social as well as financial and architectural benefits, adding: “You shouldn’t develop it through the first proposal that comes along.

“The secret of Vancouver is you make it work by making the developers build the parks and the creches for the young kids, even old folks homes.

“In other words, you tax them to make sure they give something back to the city. Now (developers in Vancouver) understand that they’ve made a lot of money out of creating a liveable city.”
Source: The Liverpool Post
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Old November 10th, 2012, 11:53 AM   #31
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useful information!!!
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Old November 11th, 2012, 01:07 AM   #32
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The professor speaks a lot of sense and hopefully Joe will be listening to him carefully.

We should embrace Vancouverism and (re)build highly dense mixed communities in the inner city that enable the city centre to gracefully merge into suburbia without the jarring mess of wasteland, industrial parks and council estates that currently fill most of the inner city.
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Old November 11th, 2012, 03:49 PM   #33
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The Canadian professor says what Liverpool really lacks is a civic central square and a city centre park. I totally agree.

I'm all for opening up and increasing the connectivity of St. George's Plateau to form a large open square, however, that isn't the solution for a large civic square that would be the central focus for the city centre that would act as the portal gateway to the city centres main districts. This location is clearly St. John's Precinct.

The new St.Johns could be relocated to the semi abandoned/derelict stretch of Lime Street. The new development would radically transform the area and would bring a vibrancy to areas around it that are ripe for development. The retail area could even be extended underground into Lime Street Station , similar, to say Zurich Station.

The city centre park could be located, aptly, along Park Lane and see the removal of those ghastly out of place suburban houses and bungalows. The park should be designed to increase connnectivity to the Waterfront via Liver Street,ropewalks via Slater Street,the cathedral and Chinatown via Gt. George Square,Liverpool One via Paradise Street. Areas around the park would be ideal locations for city centre family districts.
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Old November 11th, 2012, 05:21 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by golden66
The Canadian professor says what Liverpool really lacks is a civic central square and a city centre park. I totally agree.

I'm all for opening up and increasing the connectivity of St. George's Plateau to form a large open square, however, that isn't the solution for a large civic square that would be the central focus for the city centre that would act as the portal gateway to the city centres main districts. This location is clearly St. John's Precinct.

The new St.Johns could be relocated to the semi abandoned/derelict stretch of Lime Street. The new development would radically transform the area and would bring a vibrancy to areas around it that are ripe for development. The retail area could even be extended underground into Lime Street Station , similar, to say Zurich Station.

The city centre park could be located, aptly, along Park Lane and see the removal of those ghastly out of place suburban houses and bungalows. The park should be designed to increase connnectivity to the Waterfront via Liver Street,ropewalks via Slater Street,the cathedral and Chinatown via Gt. George Square,Liverpool One via Paradise Street. Areas around the park would be ideal locations for city centre family districts.
I totally agree, that 80s housing estate is the perfect location and size for a valuable city centre park. The Rope Walk area would be better integrated and allow people to move down towards the Baltic Triangle and arena. Bold Street, Duke Street et al are parallel to the river and should be made easier to get to it. This would encourage more business activity and housing developments.
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Old November 11th, 2012, 10:01 PM   #35
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It looks as though their considering turning the car park at the back of the Municiple Building into a 'pocket park', with a cafe built into the Municiple Building.

Page 78 of the document states: 'Potential to convert car park intoa contemporary park for the new residential community of the historic downtown.'

There's an image below, though there's a blank page in front of it.

Liverpool Vision really do need to make their documents more accessible, and provide a word document version...

Scroll down far enough and you'll see the park.

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Old November 11th, 2012, 11:05 PM   #36
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That sounds to me like a great idea. The Victoria Street car park site would be an excellent location for a city centre square. In an area with a large amount of footfall, with some great buildings facing onto it and also deep enough into the city not to be too windswept. They could retain the present levels so that the square itself would be sunk beneath adjacent ground levels.
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Old November 12th, 2012, 12:14 PM   #37
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The image above also suggests that the listed structure opposite the Municipal Building (the one with the scaffolding around it at present) will be taken down - something the Mayor has wanted for years but English Heritage oppose. It would be great to have a breathing space in front of and behind the Municipal Building so that people can truly appreciate the scale. Also the perfect location for future events - in the same way as the Town Hall in Manchester has a great setting for events.
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Old November 13th, 2012, 12:10 PM   #38
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Suppose this ties in with the plans for a more animated waterfront.

Canal Trust unveils South Docks plans




Floating homes, sculpture park, event space and enlarged marina are among the suggestions in a strategy for Liverpool's South Docks published by Canal & River Trust, formerly British Waterways.

London-based architect BACA produced the strategy as a guide "to encourage and inform future development of the waterspace within the South Docks". The area stretches from Canning Dock in the north to Brunswick Dock in the south.

The strategy identifies potential for three distinct zones within the docks:

Culture zone. Albert and Canning docks would be centre of future boat festivals, cultural celebrations and floating sculpture park
Mixed-use zone. Salthouse Dock could be floating event space with enhanced public realm and access to waterside. Dukes Dock and Wapping Basin could be home to floating waterpark including water sports, restaurants, pavilions to encourage year-round activity
Leisure and aquatecture zone. New opening bridges in Wapping, Queens, Brunswick and Coburg docks would improve existing marina and expand number of moorings for variety of boats including floating homes

Julie Sharman, head of enterprise, Canal & River Trust, said: "The architects have worked closely with key stakeholders during the last 18 months to develop an innovative and sustainable strategy to guide future developments within this wonderful historic dock system. There is so much potential and this strategy really pin points what we could see developed in the docks in the future."

The plans are expected to be approved when they go before the council executive on 19 November.

Cllr Malcolm Kennedy, cabinet member for regeneration, said: "These are exciting proposals, which will play an important part in the future development of the South Docks. The city's waterfront is one of our greatest assets and we want to develop it to its full potential. This strategy lays out the blueprint for how, working together, we can achieve that."

Richard Coutts, director of BACA Architects, added: "The waterspace strategy is a comprehensive and long-term plan to breathe new life into the once great Liverpool Docks. Unlike other water strategies, the Liverpool South Docks is conceived as a masterplan on water. It considers all aspects of design such as, 'water use', floating and fixed infrastructure, 'water plots', phasing and integration with land based development. Realisation of the plan will transform this part of Liverpool and provide a stable long-term structure for investment. Such an approach is readily transferrable to any dock network globally and can be used to stimulate opportunity and investment."

The Canal & River Trust will continue to work with Liverpool City Council and Liverpool Vision together with existing commercial operators already in the docks and future commercial partners to develop the dock system into a world class visitor attraction.

Liverpool's 86-acre waterspace is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site and is surrounded by some of the largest collections of grade 1-listed buildings in the UK.

http://www.placenorthwest.co.uk/news...cks-plans.html
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Old November 13th, 2012, 12:30 PM   #39
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I hope they don't fill the water spaces with too much floating tat.Don't like the sound of the floating sculpture park.
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Old November 13th, 2012, 02:50 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MR KITE View Post
Suppose this ties in with the plans for a more animated waterfront.

Yep, along with the recent update to the King's Dock masterplan and the Exhibition Centre. The publication is here http://canalrivertrust.org.uk/media/library/2192.pdf.

Some other highlights / no brainers ...

Short term - demolishing the concrete wall along the Strand

Long term - replacing some of the fixed bridges to allow larger boats into Salthouse, Wapping and Queens Docks
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Last edited by yoshef; November 13th, 2012 at 03:07 PM.
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