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Old April 30th, 2013, 02:41 PM   #41
Coccodrillo
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Do you have any freight statistics? Like how many tonnes per year and how many trains there are on the busiest section (excluding suburban trains).

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Originally Posted by StuZealand View Post
I'm not sure what Auckland commuter trains will use; I'll have to google it. It might be the same as Wellington's system.
25 kV AC would be more logic, in view of a future complete electrification of the NIMT.
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Old April 30th, 2013, 02:56 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neb81 View Post
IIRC the Auckland-Wellington line is of a pretty high standard and almost entirely electrified, so it shouldn't be too difficult to infill the remaining un-wired sections and get some multi-voltage EMUs to provide a more modern modern semi-high-speed 160km/h service, maybe using the QR TiltTrain design.
High standard? Isn't the speed limit of the line only 80km/h?
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Old April 30th, 2013, 11:59 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coccodrillo View Post
Do you have any freight statistics? Like how many tonnes per year and how many trains there are on the busiest section (excluding suburban trains).


25 kV AC would be more logic, in view of a future complete electrification of the NIMT.

I'll try to find some stats about freight later on.

I found this article on Auckland's electric commuter trains. They are actually 25 kV:
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/ar...ectid=10857062
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Old May 1st, 2013, 01:27 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StuZealand View Post
Here's a pic of the Mohaka viaduct on this line. It's the highest viaduct in New Zealand at 95 metres.


Very impressive bridge.
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Old May 2nd, 2013, 07:58 AM   #45
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Here's some more info about the NIMT line electrification project:

http://www.ipenz.org.nz/heritage/ite...cfm?itemid=100

The $260 million price would have been in 1984's money.
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Old May 2nd, 2013, 11:15 PM   #46
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I fail to understand the logic behind the numbering of the Matangi trains: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NZR_FP_class

They have numbers from 4103 to 4610, but they are not sequential.

Apparently the first three digit of each fleet number form an increasing sequence, so maybe the last digit is a check digit?

But even then, it's still strange: numbering would start from 410 (not from 400, or 401), and there are holes (411, 426, 430 and others are missing).

Quote:
Electrification will occur between Britomart, Papakura in the south and Swanson in the west and will be 25 kV AC from overhead lines. This is the same voltage as the electrified North Island Main Trunk between Te Rapa and Palmerston North (the Wellington suburban network uses 1500 V DC), however it will be at a considerably higher power rating rendering the EF class electric locomotives used on the main trunk incompatible.[citation needed] It is KiwiRail is responsible for providing the overhead wiring and track and signalling upgrades.[3]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aucklan...lectrification

What does it mean? Auckland network will also use 25 kV 50 Hz...
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Old May 3rd, 2013, 07:47 AM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coccodrillo View Post
I fail to understand the logic behind the numbering of the Matangi trains: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NZR_FP_class

They have numbers from 4103 to 4610, but they are not sequential.

Apparently the first three digits of each fleet number form an increasing sequence, so maybe the last digit is a check digit?

But even then, it's still strange: numbering would start from 410 (not from 400, or 401), and there are holes (411, 426, 430 and others are missing).
I have no idea either what the logic might be behind that numbering scheme.
The 4,000 HP electric locos that are used for freight trains over the central north island also have big gaps in their numbering scheme. See this link:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Zea...ass_locomotive

Quote:
Originally Posted by Coccodrillo View Post
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aucklan...lectrification

What does it mean? Auckland network will also use 25 kV 50 Hz...
"This is the same voltage as the electrified North Island Main Trunk between Te Rapa and Palmerston North (the Wellington suburban network uses 1500 V DC), however it will be at a considerably higher power rating rendering the EF class electric locomotives used on the main trunk incompatible."

I don't know who wrote this or what it actually means. It could well be incorrect (it wouldn't be the first Wikipedia article to be so).

However, the EF class were designed for hauling heavy freight trains, not lighter stop/start-on-a-regular-basis-passenger-trains.


I found this on Wikipedia today:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Zea..._multiple_unit

It's interesting to note that the new trains are actually AC powered. This means the power is drawn from the national grid (AC), converted to DC for the Wellington rail system, and then back into AC again for the new trains!
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Old May 3rd, 2013, 09:57 PM   #48
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The las must be a check digit, I see no other reason.

If you quit the last digit of the EF class numbers, all makes sense: 30007 ==> 3000, 30013 ==> 3001, 30036 ==> 3003 and so on. But, also here, some numbers are missing: 3002, 3017 and 3021.

Quote:
However, the EF class were designed for hauling heavy freight trains, not lighter stop/start-on-a-regular-basis-passenger-trains.
Sure, these freight locomotives are not designed for suburban service, but they should be able to run on suburban lines if there was need.

Quote:
It's interesting to note that the new trains are actually AC powered. This means the power is drawn from the national grid (AC), converted to DC for the Wellington rail system, and then back into AC again for the new trains!
Yes, but traction motors are certainly three-phase, like most modern electric motors for trains. Even trains built for 25 kV AC overhead line cannot use directly the 25 kV mono-phase, so the overhead line current must be converted to DC first (if it isn't already DC).
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Old May 4th, 2013, 12:17 AM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coccodrillo View Post
Yes, but traction motors are certainly three-phase, like most modern electric motors for trains. Even trains built for 25 kV AC overhead line cannot use directly the 25 kV mono-phase, so the overhead line current must be converted to DC first (if it isn't already DC).
Does that mean that there are three overhead DC lines on the cantenary? I'm no electrical expert, but I can't see how you'd convert 1 DC line into 3 phase power.

NZ has a long distance high voltage DC link from the south island to the north island. I think this has three conductors; one for each AC phase.

BTW, congrats on your 6,000th post.
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Old May 4th, 2013, 01:42 AM   #50
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Thanks, I didn't ever notice my post count!

The first locomotives with three-phase motors (we are in the 1910s) needed two cables on the overhead lines for two phases, the third phase being the tracks. This because they received three phases directly from the power stations.

The 25 kV system is mono-phase, with the phase on the overhead line and the neutral in the tracks (to simplify, the single phase of the overhead line is one of the three phases of the electrical network, the neutral is both the earth and the three phases together). So the mono-phase is just one third of the three-phase network.

This mono-phase AC is converted to DC (which hasn't any phase, because it's DC), then again to three-phase AC.

So the cases today usually are:

DC electrification: 3-phase industrial grid > rectifier > DC overhead line > train > inverter > 3-phase AC motors

AC electrification: 3-phase industrial grid > 1-phase AC overhead line > train > rectifier > DC link > inverter > 3-phase AC motors

Other systems may include:

AC electrification: 3-phase industrial grid > 1-phase AC overhead line > train > rectifier > DC motors

3-phase AC electrification: 3-phase industrial grid > 3-phase overhead line > train > 3-phase AC motors

The inter-island link might be three phase (3 cables for the 3 phases + maybe the neutral) or an HVDC link (high voltage direct current) (2 cables in theory).

Extremely simplified, and if it's all correct because it's half past midnight...
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Old May 17th, 2013, 06:42 PM   #51
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Tranz Metro
http://www.tranzmetro.co.nz/Detail.a...d-da48e7c1fc9c

Quote:
Tawa Station opens Monday 20 May 2013

The existing station building has been removed. The station will have a new shelter, both platforms resurfaced, and maintenance work completed on the overbridge.

Trains are not stopping at Tawa Station while this construction work is being completed. Regular service resumes on Monday 20 May.

For more details, visit the Metlink.org.nz website.

Here is a photo of the roof going in from Fairfax NZ News



http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post...hment-complete
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Old August 26th, 2013, 05:45 AM   #52
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Auckland's first EMU Arrives

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eswKWY00Ra4

Last edited by xinxingren; August 26th, 2013 at 10:42 PM.
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Old August 27th, 2013, 04:11 PM   #53
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This is for inner city travel, not inter city. You could post it in the Subways and Urban Transport section where there is an Auckland Public Transport thread.
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Old January 15th, 2014, 08:00 AM   #54
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This is an advert currently playing on NZ television promoting rail travel. All the scenery is from NZ's Southern Alps.

It's one train journey that I'd love to take one day:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CORPm2QFdQ4
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Old February 2nd, 2014, 09:26 AM   #55
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Old February 3rd, 2014, 02:16 AM   #56
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Same as above. This is more for intercity travel. The Auckland thread in the Subways and Urban Transport thread is better for Auckland urban rail. Thanks.
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Old February 6th, 2014, 08:40 PM   #57
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Last delivery of the day for lucky driver

Quote:
A courier driver who needed to make a delivery to a house should have thought twice before parking his van on train tracks.

His van was, unsurprisingly, wiped out by a passing train.

The bizarre incident at Oaro, near Kaikoura, about 6.10pm on Wednesday came as train drivers are experiencing an alarming "spate" of near misses with motorists at crossings, particularly in the South Island.

Kaikoura police responded to the incident, but no-one was hurt in the collision, a police spokesman said.

The driver was delivering the parcel at the house when the van was hit.

KiwiRail and police are urging motorists to obey level crossing warnings after 19 near-collisions since the start of the year, where drivers crossed in front of approaching trains.

Twelve were at crossings protected by flashing lights and bells, in four incidents the motorists drove around other vehicles which had stopped, and one driver had to swerve to avoid the train.

KiwiRail chief executive Jim Quinn urged people to heed warnings, be patient, and not put themselves and passengers at risk.

"There is no journey so important that it can't wait a couple of minutes," he said.

"Trains are large and heavy, can be travelling faster that they appear and simply cannot stop quickly.

"There is nothing our train drivers can do when confronted with a situation like this other than to sound their horn and hope for the best. It is a very distressing situation for them."

In 2013, KiwiRail recorded 107 near collisions with vehicles at level crossings - 43 per cent at crossings with flashing lights and bells operating and 40 per cent with half-arm barriers operating.

In 2012, there were 154 near collisions reported, 83 per cent of which were at crossings with active protection.

TrackSAFE NZ manager Megan Drayton said a disproportionate 63 per cent of "reckless and impatient" near collisions happened in the South Island.

Five out of the 19 were on the railway line between Rolleston and Greymouth, and four on the railway line between Christchurch and Invercargill.

Police inspector Mark Stables said it was a traffic offence to ignore warnings.

Kaikoura police were yesterday unavailable for comment about the courier van incident.
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Old February 27th, 2014, 03:38 PM   #58
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Today:

Quote:
http://www.railwaygazette.com/news/n...-zimbabwe.html

New Zealand trains sold to Tanzania and Zimbabwe
27 Feb 2014


The Ganz-Mavag Class EM/ET electric multiple-unit cars are to be used in Tanzania and Zimbabwe


The Ganz-Mavag EMUs are being replaced by Matangi EMUs ordered from a consortium of Hyundai Rotem and Mitsui

AFRICA: An initial 34 Ganz-Mavag Class EM/ET electric multiple-unit cars which a South African rolling stock broker has acquired from Greater Wellington Regional Council for reuse in Tanzania and Zimbabwe has been shipped from New Zealand.

The 44 Hungarian-built two-car EMUs entered service in 1982. They are being replaced by a fleet of 83 Matangi EMUs which GWRC ordered from a consortium of Hyundai Rotem and Mitsui in 2007, 2008 and 2013.

On arrival in Africa the 1 067 mm gauge EMUs will be converted into locomotive-hauled stock. Some will be changed to metre gauge to operate an airport shuttle service in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, while the rest will be used to reinstate services from Harare in Zimbabwe to the coast, a route served by 500 buses a day.

The remainder of the 42 Ganz-Mavag units which have been sold will go to Africa once the next batch of Matangi EMUs arrives in Wellington in mid-2015. One unit is to be retained for heritage purposes.
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Old May 28th, 2014, 01:02 PM   #59
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Mott MacDonald has been selected to undertake the reference design for the NZ$2.86bn ($2.44bn) upgrade of the City Rail Link (CRL) project in Auckland, New Zealand.

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Old May 30th, 2014, 02:25 AM   #60
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The CRL is an Auckland project and belongs in the Auckland public transport thread in the Subways & Urban Transport thread. Thank you...

This thread is about the national train system in NZ.
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