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Old July 14th, 2005, 05:51 PM   #101
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Boeing looks to Asia for buyers
Jul 14


Boeing, the world's second-biggest maker of commercial planes, hopes airlines in India, the Middle East and Asia will buy its 777-200LR model, as losses at North American carriers forced them to cut orders.

"We think there is demand for 200 passenger versions of the plane and 200 of the freighter model," said Boeing's 777 program chief Lars Andersen in Hong Kong.

Sales of the 777-200LR have been hurt as losses at North American airlines and surging fuel costs reduced the need for an aircraft that can fly non-stop for 17,445 kilometres, or 10 per cent further than the Airbus A340-500.

The airlines of India and China may be the world's biggest aircraft buyers in the next 20 years, as they renew their fleets and expand to cater for increasing demand for air travel. Chinese airlines might need 1790 planes valued at $US230 billion ($303.87 billion) by 2023, while India-based carriers could buy 570 planes, Airbus said in March.

US carriers including United Airlines, Delta Air Lines and American Airlines were the 777-200LR's main sales targets. They've struggled to stay solvent since the 2001 terrorist attacks, which also delayed the aircraft's introduction. To bolster its sagging sales, Chicago-based Boeing is promoting the world's longest-range aircraft to Asian airlines.


"A 777 suits carriers in India because they need planes that can fly non-stop to the US or Australia," said Kapil Kaul, the New Delhi-based chief executive of the India unit of the Centre for Asia-Pacific Aviation.

"There is a very large pool of Indians who want to fly such long distances."

Boeing had orders for five 777-200LRs from EVA Airways and Pakistan International Airlines, and was in talks to sell cargo versions of the plane to EVA Airways, he said.

"We're out there everyday to promote the benefits of the aircraft to our customers," Mr Andersen said. "Our philosophy of providing airplanes that can take people where they want to go no matter how far they want to go is taking hold and airlines are responding," he said.

The Boeing 777-200LR can carry as many as 301 passengers in a standard three-class seating and has a list price of $US225.5 million. The Airbus A350-500, used by Singapore Airlines on its 18-hour non-stop flight to New York, can carry 313 passengers and costs as much as $US211 million.

Long-distance flights may be in demand. Singapore Airlines, which operates the world's longest flight from Singapore to Newark airport in New Jersey, has placed orders for 10 Airbus A340-500 planes.

Boeing's board approved the construction of a freighter version of the 777 aircraft in May, after Air France-KLM Group ordered eight of the planes in a deal valued at $US1.4 billion.

ACE Aviation Holdings, the parent of Air Canada, last month cancelled a $US6.1 billion order for 18 Boeing 777s and 14 787s after the airline's pilots rejected a contract to fly them.

India-based airlines were the biggest aircraft buyers at the Paris International Air Show in June, ordering 213 new planes valued at $US24 billion.

Air India, that nation's biggest overseas carrier, plans to buy 23 777 planes and 27 of the 787 model. The order requires government approval.
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Old July 19th, 2005, 05:44 PM   #102
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B777-200LR "Going The Distance" Asia Tour, Taipei stop July 1st!

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Old July 20th, 2005, 12:12 PM   #103
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Isan
B777-200LR "Going The Distance" Asia Tour, Taipei stop July 1st!


i thought the plane is in singapore right now???
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Old July 20th, 2005, 07:17 PM   #104
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Some New released PIC on June

On June 28 the Boeing 777-200LR Worldliner, the world's longest-range commercial airplane, debuts at Beijing's Capital International Airport. It was officially named "Zheng He" to commemorate the first voyage of the great Chinese navigator and explorer Zheng He 600 years ago. Its "Going the Distance"world tour started in Canada and will visit more than 20 cities through August. In service it can carry 301 passengers and baggage up to 17,445 kilometers.


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Old July 20th, 2005, 07:20 PM   #105
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Old July 20th, 2005, 08:30 PM   #106
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Boeing confident new long-range plane will help it catch up to Airbus
By Gillian Wong / Associated Press



SINGAPORE -- With its sales lagging behind Airbus, Boeing Co. is confident its newest 777 model will help it catch up to its archrival in the high-stakes battle for long-range jet supremacy.

The new 777-200LR Worldliner is designed to compete directly with the popular Airbus 340-500, which has a flight range of 10,380 miles.

"Airbus had an advantage to sell that kind of airplane without any competitor at the time," Lars Anderson, vice president of Boeing's 777 program, said Friday, while on a 20-city tour around the world pitching the new jet.

Boeing says its plane has several advantages over its Airbus competitor: It claims to use 20 percent less fuel and can carry more passengers and up to 11 tons more cargo.

Still, the first delivery of the 777-200LR, to Pakistan International Airlines, isn't until 2006. Already, 18 A340-500s are in use by some of the world's biggest carriers like Singapore Airlines Ltd. and Hong Kong-based Cathay Pacific.

The 777-200LR carries 301 passengers in a three-class configuration. The A340-500 carries 280.

Pakistan's national carrier has ordered two of the new Boeing planes while Taiwan's Eva Airways has placed orders for three. Three other airlines have also made firm commitments to the plane, Boeing said in a statement Friday.

The plane, Boeing's fifth version of the 777, is part of a program that began in 1989. As recently as last year, when Airbus was speeding ahead with orders for its long-range offerings -- A340-500, A380s and A350s -- Boeing was still working on its mid-range 787 Dreamliner.

Both Boeing and Airbus claim their planes are the world's longest-range airliners.

"The 777-200LR is capable of connecting almost any two cities in the world nonstop" Boeing said in a statement.

In mid-2004, a Singapore Airlines A340-500 set a world record by flying 18 hours from Singapore to New York, the longest distance for a nonstop commercial flight.

The Chicago-based company, which builds most of its commercial planes in the Seattle area, has lost to Airbus in commercial airplane sales the past two years.

At the Paris air show, Le Bourget, in June, Airbus sold $33.5 billion worth of airplanes with 280 orders while Boeing made 146 jet sales worth about $15 billion.

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Old July 21st, 2005, 09:48 AM   #107
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While I don't dispute the technical superiority of the Boeing 777-200LR over the Airbus 340-500, I personally feel Boeing could have done better with the naming.

The A343, A345 and A346 refer to very different planes, but B772, B772ER and B772LR give me the impression that they're just slightly improved versions of one another. In computer terms, it's like comparing ABC Software Ver 1.2a with Ver 1.2b. Perhaps Boeing could have named its planes B772, B774 and B776 or something along those lines instead.

Personally, I am a fan of the A345, but that's because I've had the opportunity to try this wonderful aircraft with our wonderful airline twice. Who knows, maybe my opinions will change if SIA orders the B772LR. Then it'd be time to change my nick.
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Old July 21st, 2005, 09:54 AM   #108
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I'm a little confused. There's mention that the GE90-115B will power both the B772LR and B773ER, however Post #6 says the B772LR is powered by the GE90-110B1. Which is right?
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Old July 21st, 2005, 10:13 AM   #109
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chibcha2k
It looks nice...but the A345 is better for me
I share your sentiments. Aesthetically, I think the A345 looks better. Much longer and "grander-looking". The B772LR looks -- this is just my perception -- like a typical medium-haul B777 to me.
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Old July 21st, 2005, 10:57 AM   #110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A345
I share your sentiments. Aesthetically, I think the A345 looks better. Much longer and "grander-looking". The B772LR looks -- this is just my perception -- like a typical medium-haul B777 to me.
I like the 777 really, maybe the plane is just like any other plane you've seen around, but hey, in the inside it's a whole new bird.
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Old July 21st, 2005, 10:50 PM   #111
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AFL
i thought the plane is in singapore right now???
Not sure and could be of its the second final trip in Asia, Singapore now after ariving to Hong Kong on 13th July, than she will be ongoing to Australia to the end
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Old July 22nd, 2005, 11:04 AM   #112
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A345
I'm a little confused. There's mention that the GE90-115B will power both the B772LR and B773ER, however Post #6 says the B772LR is powered by the GE90-110B1. Which is right?
GE90-115B actually powers the 777 300ER while GE90-110B powers the 777-200LR, got that?
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Old July 28th, 2005, 07:51 AM   #113
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Quote:
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GE90-115B actually powers the 777 300ER while GE90-110B powers the 777-200LR, got that?
Got it. Thanks for the clarification.
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Old July 28th, 2005, 08:06 AM   #114
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Photos from recent 777-200LR visit to Hong Kong by 253 from HKADB :









































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Old July 28th, 2005, 09:59 AM   #115
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That's More Like It... I love the pics!!!!
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Old August 11th, 2005, 12:31 PM   #116
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Boeing 777-200LR Worldliner completes World Tour
10 August 2005


The Boeing 777-200LR Worldliner returned to Seattle this past Sunday after completing its "Going the Distance" tour that took the airplane to 24 cities across the globe.

The tour began the evening of June 9 with a flight from Montreal to Paris, where the 777-200LR had a week-long stay at the Paris Air Show. The 777-200LR visited cities across the Middle East, Asia, Europe, Australia, and North America. Among the cities visited were Singapore, Islamabad, Beijing, Dubai, Sydney, Hong Kong, Mumbai, London, Mexico City, New Delhi, Taipei, Doha and Newark.

"On this tour the 777-200LR demonstrated its unmatched range capability, as well as its superior efficiency and passenger comfort," said Lars Andersen, vice president and program manager, 777 Program, Boeing Commercial Airplanes. "The response to the airplane from airline customers around the world has been overwhelmingly positive."

During the 61-day world tour the 777-200LR flew a distance of more than 70,000 nautical miles (129,640 kilometers); made 38 separate flights, and visited 17 countries. General Electric Aircraft Engines, Bose, Thales, AeroMobile, Motorola and Teague were among Boeing's tour partners.

The 777-200LR will continue its flight testing as Boeing prepares the airplane for certification later this year. The first 777-200LR will be delivered to Pakistan International Airlines in early 2006.

The 777-200LR, capable of connecting virtually any two cities in the world nonstop, is the fifth 777 model. In service it can carry 301 passengers and baggage up to 9,420 nautical miles (17,445 kilometers).

In addition to Pakistan International Airlines, other airlines that have ordered or announced commitments for the 777-200LR include Air India, Jet Airways, EVA Air and Qatar Airways.

Later this year, the Worldliner will attempt a new record for nonstop distance traveled by a commercial airplane.
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Old September 7th, 2005, 09:44 PM   #117
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777-200LR Flight Test Journal
06 September 2005
Say cheese
Deb Hanford, Flight Test photographer
Joe Parke, Flight Test photographer


We're not exactly fashion photographers, but we spend an awful lot of time taking pictures of "super models" doing some pretty amazing runway work.

The two of us make up Boeing's Flight Test Photography department, and we think we have the best jobs in the company - most of the time. Some doubt creeps into our minds on those occasions when we have to be on the runway at Edwards Air Force Base at 4 a.m., or when we have to climb inside a fuel tank or an engine.

While many of you have seen examples of our work - in the form of press-release photos, first-flight videos or if you have been reading this journal on a regular basis - the vast majority of our work is seen by a very limited number of people, or no one at all.

That's because a lot of our work deals with the technical side of Flight Test, and the images we take would be of little interest to anyone except those who request it.

Sometimes, the images we produce would seem downright boring to most people. For example, we might be asked to video tape the reaction of a certain part under specific flight conditions. Well, if the desired reaction is no reaction at all, and if the test is successful, the video will show this certain part doing nothing. Pretty boring to most people, but the engineers who designed the part will do cartwheels in the aisles when they see the video.

We also get to do our share of exciting stuff, especially during test programs like the one going on now with the 777-200LR Worldliner. We accompany planes to places like Edwards, where they test things like minimum flying velocity, abusive takeoffs and engine failures. Those are very dramatic. On occasion, our jobs have taken us to some exotic locations - including New Zealand and South America - but that doesn't happen very often.

For the most part, the videos and photos we capture are used for data analysis and serve as visual records so if the FAA or anyone else wants to know how a certain test was instrumented, we can pull out a photo and show them. Visual data is considered backup data to the digital data, but on those rare occasions when digital data fails, the visual data becomes primary.

Between the two of us, we have 43 years of Boeing experience, 38 of those in Flight Test. That is a real benefit because of the technical aspects of our job. We've gained a lot of intricate knowledge about airplane systems, and when a lot of technical jargon is being tossed around in pre-flight meetings, we understand most of it. If there is something we don't understand, we always ask. We get only one chance during these tests. They are very expensive and if the test is a success, they won't do it again just because we didn't get our photo.

We're referred to as Flight Test photographers, but that only tells part of the story. We're really a full-service organization when it comes to photo and video, including printing and editing. For instance, if someone wants a DVD with video highlights from tests being conducted at Edwards, we can put it together. We can even provide full darkroom and motion picture services, although the evolution of digital photography and video has made that more or less obsolete.

We also take a lot of pride in our response times. When we're asked to be on the runway in 13 minutes to capture something, we try to be there in 12 - because we have the best jobs in the company.

31 August 2005
The Cave
Noel Lucero, Lead, Aerodynamics Performance Certification, Takeoff Team
Fred Krueger, Lead, Flight Test Aero Analysis Engineering Team

Flight tests of the 777-200LR, or any other airplane model, produce an enormous amount of data. All of that information needs to be carefully analyzed to make sure our tests tell us what we need to know: Is the airplane performing to Boeing standards and FAA certification requirements?

That's a lot of what our teams do. We determine the conditions or specific performance characteristics that need testing. Then, we make sure the airplane gets the necessary instrumentation required for us to gather the data we need. During testing, our groups run software tools that calculate real-time and post condition data. This information allows us to evaluate condition quality and pilot techniques.

We give the pilots a "bug card." This card tells them the parameters we're targeting for the next test condition. Our teams have created very nice software tools that generate the bug card onboard the airplane. It includes the takeoff field lengths and the target engine failure speed, rotation speed, climb-out speed and pitch angle, and the power setting to hit the target thrust-to-weight ratio at liftoff.

Then we go through and conduct the targeted condition. As soon as they call "condition off" and we're turning around to come back and land, we're busy processing the data.

We also give the pilots feedback about how they flew the condition - such as how they hit the target speeds, pitch rates and pitch angles, or if they used too much wheel during an engine-out condition and raised some spoilers. If the condition targets were missed, we work with the pilots to determine what techniques they could use to get the kind of performance we're looking for.

We work together to see if the last condition was good or bad, based on how the condition met predicted performance and if the atmospheric conditions were within tolerances, and if we need to fly it again or can move on to the next test condition. For some programs there isn't much turnaround time between conditions, maybe five or 10 minutes, so we have to turn data around very quickly. Even though we have the tools to do a lot of the data analysis onboard the airplane, after the test day is over we still go back to "The Cave."

If you've talked to anybody who has been on a remote at Edwards Air Force Base in California, you've probably heard about "The Cave." It is just a hotel room or conference room, but it has a colorful history. It's where we keep the equipment that allows us to analyze flight test data with a fine-toothed comb, on-site. The first hotel room that served this purpose was a bit of a dump - dark and dingy, which is the genesis of the name, "The Cave."

There are sometimes different groups that have to be in this tiny room together for long hours. So we set up some rules, which make it fun. For instance, you can't be in the cave barefoot. Imagine what it would be like in this tiny room with everyone's bare feet on top of the table that we're all working on! It's amazing how well we manage to work together and get our jobs done.

The Cave is also like our own little network. We take our laptops, a router and a server and we're in constant communication with Seattle to supply testing updates. We take everything into The Cave in case we need to make changes on the fly. The airplane performance is what it is. You can't change it. We have to see if it was flown correctly within the parameters we're looking for and if the atmospheric conditions were good enough to get consistent data.

Flight testing the -200LR at Edwards went pretty well, especially compared to its predecessor, the -300ER. For the earlier model we ended up waiting for 45 days to do five days worth of testing, mostly because the winds were blowing like crazy. We need calm winds, which means testing at the crack of dawn. We were onboard the airplane at 4:45 for a 5:39 taxi down the runway, which makes for a long day. We do more before 9 a.m. than the Air Force does the rest of the day!

26 August 2005
Cruise control
Mariann Jansen, autoflight systems engineer
Jim Vanden Brook, autoflight certification leader
Doug Ormiston, autoflight systems engineer

Autopilot is just what the name implies - operating key airplane flight functions automatically. It's like the cruise control on your car. Only much more advanced. Let me give you an idea of what's involved. The Autopilot Flight Director System (AFDS) is the main component to autopilot. AFDS provides two major types of guidance: the automatic pilot and the Flight Director.

Automatic pilot sends out commands that move the control surfaces in the cockpit, and the Flight Director requires the pilot to manually control the airplane, but with some guidance. When flying the Flight Director, the pilot lines up and centers the pitch and roll command bars, which gives her the guidance she wants.

Both systems can have a selection of different modes. For takeoff, only Flight Director guidance is available. Once the airplane gets above 200 feet, and for the remainder of the flight, various autopilot modes are available. The pilots use the Mode Control Panel (MCP) to select the desired AFDS mode, altitude, heading and speed.

For example, there is a mode that just holds the airplane's altitude and one that allows the pilot to change heading. There also are what we call L-Nav and V-Nav modes, or lateral and vertical navigation, which are the most popular. These modes allow airlines to set up pre-programmed flight paths. The paths can always be changed once the flight is in progress.

The most complicated mode is "autoland," which is the automatic landing function. It's the one we spend the most time testing. It has to be very precise and there are a wide variety of problems that can turn up. It has to be able to handle different facilities, terrain and Instrument Landing Systems (ILS) characteristics. On the 777, ILS is currently the only guidance we allow in the autoland mode.

If the airplane gets within range of an ILS and the pilot wants to do an approach, she selects the 'approach' button on the mode control panel. The pilot must manually move the flap lever and the gear handle. Then, typically the pilot will arm auto-speed brakes and auto-brakes, which provide automatic braking on the ground. The airplane can come to a complete stop on the runway without any additional manual action.

We have to meet strict FAA autoland performance and integrity requirements, ranging from how closely we track the ILS beams, to where on the runway the airplane touches down. We have to anticipate almost any condition the pilots may encounter.

Autoland is not necessarily a mirror image of how the pilot would fly. The idea is to get pilots comfortable with what autopilot is doing so they don't have to make a lot of corrections just before touchdown.

A lot of our certification testing package is done using the flight simulator. We first demonstrate in actual flight test a good cross-section of the challenges the system might face in real service. Then, to prove the accuracy of our flight simulation, we use flight test data on configuration, winds, terrain and runway information to recreate the flight test scenarios. Once we know it's accurate, we use the simulation to run a statistical performance analysis covering tens of thousands of approaches, varying everything from airplane configuration, airport parameters and winds, to a selection of failures.

We listen to what the airlines tell us about the autopilot performance and capabilities and usually make a few changes with each airplane derivative. There are several exciting improvements in the works for upcoming models. That's the benefit of technology. It allows us to always improve our products.



In flight test, over the Puget Sound area, most likely testing the autoland and auto-brake functions.


As you can see, this was a great location for testing - no mountains, clear sky and early morning cool air.
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Old September 7th, 2005, 09:47 PM   #118
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Boeing 777-200LR Worldiner

Impressive

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Old September 7th, 2005, 11:05 PM   #119
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i love to see that bird flying!!!

and the colors are beautiful!!!
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Old November 10th, 2005, 05:49 PM   #120
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Boeing 777 Makes World's Longest Nonstop Commercial Flight : Hong Kong - London

Boeing arrives in London at end of world's longest nonstop commercial flight
By EMILY BEHLMANN
10 November 2005

LONDON (AP) - A Boeing Co. jet arrived in London from Hong Kong on Thursday after 22 hours and 43 minutes in the air, breaking the record for the longest nonstop flight by a commercial jet.

The 777-200LR Worldliner -- one of Boeing's newest planes -- touched down shortly after 1 p.m. (1300 GMT) at London's Heathrow Airport after a journey of more than 18,662 kilometers (11,664 miles).

A representative of Guinness World Records, which monitored the flight, presented Boeing's Lars Andersen with a certificate confirming it was for the longest nonstop commercial flight.

Captain Suzanna Darcy-Hennemann, was at the controls when the plane left Hong Kong, said the trip east across the Pacific had been bumpy.

"But we had a great ride across the United States ... and across the Atlantic we saw our second sunrise of the trip," she said.

The previous record was set when a Boeing 747-400 flew 17,039 kilometers (10,500 miles) from London to Sydney in 1989.

Andersen said the Hong Kong-to-London flight showed the future of air travel.

"With the 777-200LR, we are changing the world," he said. "Passengers can fly commercially between just about any two cities nonstop."

The plane had four pilots and was carrying 35 passengers and crew, including Boeing representatives, journalists and customers.

The record-breaking attempt is part of Boeing's fierce competition with its European rival Airbus. The Boeing 777-200LR Worldliner was designed to compete directly with the popular Airbus 340-500, which has a flight range of 16,700 kilometers (10,380 miles).

Boeing said that after leaving Hong Kong, the jet flew across the northern Pacific Ocean before reaching North America, where it flew over Los Angeles, then slightly south of Chicago and over New York before cruising over the Atlantic Ocean to London. Hong Kong-London flights usually fly over Russia.

------

On the Net:

The plane's flight path can be tracked at http://www.777.newairplane.com
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