daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Continental Forums > North American Skyscrapers Forum > United States Urban Issues > Midwest and Plains > Development News



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old July 31st, 2005, 09:23 AM   #101
Xing500
Registered User
 
Xing500's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: O'Fallon IL(ST LOUIS)/ CHICAGO IL
Posts: 179
Likes (Received): 0

There are more Bosnians in STL than anywhere else in the US. I don't know the number.
__________________
XING
Xing500 no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
 
Old August 1st, 2005, 04:30 PM   #102
Expat
Registered User
 
Expat's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Greater Boston
Posts: 994
Likes (Received): 2

Isn't the St. Louis Bosnian community centered in the Bevo Mill neighborhood. Somebody should post a pic of Bevo Mill. You don't see a building like that everyday!
Expat no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 20th, 2005, 10:13 AM   #103
Rogee
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 114
Likes (Received): 0

I'm a first time poster... long time lurker.

I just returned home to Milwaukee from a two-day trip to Saint Louis, and I'd like to share my thoughts. I had a couple vacation days to use up, so I thought I'd see a city I've never been to and check out a Cardinals game. I stayed at the Millennium Hotel downtown.

It amazed me how many tourists were there to see the Cardinals play. It also amazed me how many people were at the arch. I never though of Saint Louis as a tourist town, but it really is.

Downtown was easy to get around, not too crowded, and clean. Although the heat was almost unbearable, I grabbed a water bottle and walked around, snapping photos of anything interesting. In general, building architecture wasn't anything spectacular, but downtown has a good grouping of buildings.

I was really impressed by the arch. I really wish Milwaukee had some kind of cool world-famous landmark like that. However, I wasn't too impressed with the riverfront in general. The park seemed detached from the river, and the road on the bottom of the steps doesn't help. Although much smaller, La Crosse, WI has a great Mississippi riverfront where people can walk right up to it. I think Saint Louis should try something like that. I'm kind of spoiled having my city on Lake Michigan.

Before I left I decided to take a spin on 55 south, and loop back up on 270. Wow. Saint Louis has quite an extensive freeway system, and incredibly populated suburbs. I am definitely not accustomed to constant suburban traffic - 5 lanes across!! Did all the freeways spur the suburbs, or did the suburban expansion initiate the freeways? (chicken or the egg?)

Anyway, I zipped down 170 and took 64 back into downtown, and then headed home. The view of downtown from 64 wasn't that great, but the double-decker freeway was kind of cool.

Sorry for the long post, but I had a great time in Saint Louis, and would recommend it to anyone. I would love to return and spend more time there - but maybe in the fall when it's cooler outside!
Rogee no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 20th, 2005, 06:39 PM   #104
STLgasm
Live from red brick mama
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 376
Likes (Received): 1

Thanks for your observations, Rogee. I'm glad you had a good time in St. Louis. It's too bad you didn't take a drive around the city streets (outside of downtown), because that's where the true soul of St. Louis lives. There are definitely lots of busy highways throughout the metro area. I have a feeling you didn't get into the meat of downtown, around Olive, Locust or Washington Ave., because the buildings that line those canyon streets are quite beautiful and surprisingly intact. It sounds like you stayed around the southern portion of downtown and the Arch grounds.

Anyway, I hope you come back and spend some more time. There are plenty of forumers here who would be happy to show you around!
STLgasm no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 20th, 2005, 11:37 PM   #105
KDS
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 27
Likes (Received): 0

Trip to St. Louis part II

Interestingly enough, I too was in St. Louis this past week and am also from Milwaukee. My trip however was more business than pleasure, although in my field it's very hard to differentiate the two if you are a lover of cities. Spent three days in your city from Wednesday till Friday, thought you might enjoy an outsiders perspective. Some observations:

St. Louis has the greatest concentration of old first tier suburbs of any rustbelt city I've ever visited outside of Chicago. Far more than Milwaukee, Cincinnati, Cleveland or Detroit. It is a seemingly never ending arc of gorgeous early 20th century homes from the Clayton/University area through Ladue, Frontenac, Kirkwood, parts of Webster Grove, and Crestwood. Unbelievably enjoyable areas to drive though. The old money concentrated there is quite impressive.

Even more staggering is the amount of wealth found in the "true" suburbs. I was amazed driving through O'Fallon (MO), St. Peter, Chesterfield, Ellisville and Ballwin. At times, I honestly felt like I was driving through parts of the western suburbs of Washington DC. The Chesterfield/O’Fallon area is booming. Is that a strictly Biotech office park development off Hwy 64 & Hwy K in O'Fallon? Much more suburban office space in metro St. Louis than I expected to see. How much of this is can be attributed to the biotech initiative, how much is excess capacity from the late 90's and how much is due to plain old economic growth/expansion of existing major corporations within the market? I'm not really up on the major employers of the area although my brief observations lead me to believe that St. Louis is a far more diversified economy than Milwaukee, far less reliant on manufacturing ( although Boeing and Chrysler have a major presence) and is much further along in attracting and developing life science and high tech employers.

Your suburban wealth has certainly caught the attention of national retailers/restaurateurs. Although I'm sure it didn't hurt to have May CO. headquartered there.

Interesting to see the multiple high density office nodes extending out of the urban core. You have the CBD, then another high density collection around the AG Edwards building. Another concentration around University of St. Louis, yet another around Washington University Medical College off Kingshighway and then a major one around Washington University in Clayton.

Went to the Hills for Italian one night. I didn't really know where to go so I just drove around a bit till I found a restaurant that didn't have a shitload of cars parked in front of it. Honest question, how many restaurants are in this little district? I'm not sure I was in the heart of it, on the edge of it or what. People I talked to in the city kept telling me I had to eat there, so I'm assuming it is a pretty big collection of Italian places, but I never found a "restaurant row" so to speak. Are they all just neighborhood corner type places?

Downtown, not sure how to begin. Lot's of vacant ground level retail space. Far more than in Milwaukee. Far more than what I can remember of Cleveland or Cincinnati as well. Was unable to get into the mall/Famous Barr. Was closed when I got there, although from the exterior it did not look too prosperous. Are there any major redevelopment plans in the works? What is the development taking place on 9th? I saw work being done on the main elevator shaft so it looks like it will have some height to it. However, it also looks like it will have a major ground level retail presence. Not sure how that will fly given the amount of vacancy already in the CBD. Did not like how the city seems to turn its back to the river. Having I-70 run in front of the river doesn't help much. I also expected to see more residential development than I did. The two areas of focus appear to be along Washington St. and immediately west of the Busch Stadium area. Washington St. was an interesting drive. Looks like condo conversion taking place in just about every building along the street. The bad thing is that when driving the area it seems like all the buildings are focused on Washington St. and there is no depth on either side. Hopefully, as your CBD continues to add more residents, these areas will fill in. It is also possible, nay probable, that I missed much of what is taking place in the CBD. While I managed to make it down there twice, I didn't have much time to spend either time. I do think the new ballpark will be fantastic. Will the bottle district be directly south of the Stadium on the other side of 64? What are the plans for the old stadium? Forgive my ignorance, I haven't read through your St. Louis threads, just thought I'd drop by and post some of my observations.
KDS no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 21st, 2005, 06:11 AM   #106
Expat
Registered User
 
Expat's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Greater Boston
Posts: 994
Likes (Received): 2

KDS, interesting post, because most people visiting STL see downtown and often don't get out to the neighborhoods. Sounds like you did the opposite. That is good, because you got to see the beautiful inner suburbs of St. Louis. It is a pleasure to drive through these neighborhoods --and to live in these neighborhoods. Did you get a chance to see some of STL City neighborhoods, like the Central West End, Lafayette Square, Soulard, and many others. They are loaded with charm and incredible architecture. The Hill is an Italian neighborhood with many good restaurants, but they are not lined up on one street as you might expect. So, you didn't miss anything. But, there are plenty of areas around the city that have the type of urban restaurant row experience you were looking for. Your take on DT is fairly accurate, but as a visitor you may not have gotten a sense of forward movement that is taking hold. A lot of things are in the works that will address many of the weaknesses you mention, such as linking river and city. The city is aggressively developing residentual DT at a rate I have never seen before, as well as expanding its rail transit system. Old Busch stadium will be imploded soon (i have mixed feelings about this), but the new stadium and Ballpark Village development surrounding the stadium will be great. To answer your question, the Bottle District will be built in the area north of the convention center. It is supposed to have a residential component with high-rise residential towers, which may address some of the "depth" on Washington you mentioned. Nearly every historic building in DT STL has been renovated, or is in active planning stages - many converted to condos. There will be no choice, but to begin infill with new buildings, again addressing the depth issue. I live in the DC area and recognize what you mean about the similarities of DC & STL suburbs. Lots of wealth. Much of it is old money. I cannot comment on economy & business aspects of STL, because I don't know much about it.
Expat no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 21st, 2005, 06:19 AM   #107
JivecitySTL
The Jive is Alive.
 
JivecitySTL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: St. Louis
Posts: 1,548
Likes (Received): 0

Great recap, KDS. I think the Hill is one of the most impressive neighborhoods in STL-- a true old-world ethnic enclave. Restaurants do not line one single street, but there are dozens upon dozens of Italian trattorias, markets and bakeries interspersed throughout the neighborhood.

It is a shame you missed some of the best neighborhoods in the city (mentioned by Expat), but that should be on your list for next time.

I am totally 100% against the new ballpark. The old Busch is a million times cooler and more original. Oh well.

I am very proud of St. Louis' ability to remain an important city, despite decline. It's diversified economy has enabled it to stay relevant in the modern world.
__________________
You can't spell STYLE without STL.
www.stl-style.com
JivecitySTL no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 5th, 2005, 07:18 AM   #108
Citylover
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: St. Louis (Chesterfield)
Posts: 118
Likes (Received): 0

Curtain's up: Breckenridge signs Kiel deal
From the September 2, 2005 print edition
Christopher Tritto


Developer Don Breckenridge got the green light to move forward on his $45 million redevelopment of Kiel Opera House and an adjacent garage.

The go-ahead appears to indicate a local buyer is in the wings for the St. Louis Blues.

Mark Sauer, president of the Savvis Center and the Blues, agreed to lease the Kiel Opera House to Breckenridge and assured Breckenridge that he could proceed with his planned parking garage next door, Breckenridge said.

The Kiel Opera House, which includes a 3,500-seat main auditorium and four adjoining smaller theaters, was closed in 1991 when construction of Savvis Center began. Breckenridge's renovations will include constructing a sound-proof wall between Kiel and the Savvis Center and expanding loading docks.

Breckenridge has been trying for three years to redevelop Kiel as a venue for Broadway shows. The Savvis Center and the Opera House are physically connected, and Savvis Center holds the long-term lease on the building.

Sauer's move indicates team and building owners Bill and Nancy Laurie are confident they will find a new owner who will keep the Blues in St. Louis.

When the Lauries put the Blues and Savvis Center up for sale June 17, parking became an issue for Breckenridge, who plans to convert the former L. Douglas Abrams Federal Building at 15th and Market streets into an 800-space garage to serve Kiel.

"There's no need for two parking garages," he said. "It depended on whether the team would stay and use their garage or not. If it would, we'd build another parking garage (in the Abrams building). (The Lauries and Sauer) certainly have to know where they are going for them to give us the go-ahead."

Sauer and the Blues declined to comment for this story.

Breckenridge said several local parties remain interested in buying the Blues. The Business Journal reported Aug. 19 that local groups being assembled by Michael Shanahan Sr. and his son Michael Shanahan Jr., Shaun Hayes, Tony Sansone Jr., and Tony Novelly and his son P.A. Novelly II have emerged as potential buyers of the Blues.

Michael Shanahan Sr., chairman emeritus of Engineered Support Systems Inc., helped build the St. Louis Blues franchise in the 1990s until he was forced out by Civic Progress leaders. His son, Shanahan Jr., owns the Huntleigh/McGehee Inc. insurance agency and an area minor league hockey team, the Missouri River Otters. That team plays in the St. Charles Family Arena. When the Lauries announced they were selling the Blues, Shanahan Jr. was among the first to express an interest in buying the club.

Hayes is regional president of National City Bank. Tony Novelly is chairman of Apex Oil Co., while his son is an executive with Stifel, Nicolaus & Co. Sansone is a principal in his family's commercial real estate firm, The Sansone Group.

Breckenridge also said Los Angeles-based AEG remains interested in buying the long-term lease on the arena. AEG owns and operates entertainment venues and sports teams around the country but would be prohibited from buying the Blues, because the company already owns the Los Angeles Kings hockey team.

Boston-based Game Plan LLC is managing the sale on behalf of the Lauries. Bob Caporale, Game Plan's chairman, said AEG is one of a few venue owner-operators that have expressed interest in the Savvis Center.

"We don't comment on any deals that are in negotiations," said AEG spokesman Michael Roth. "I can't even give you a gauge of our interest. But we own and operate venues as part of our core business."

Breckenridge said his architects were scheduled to arrive from Washington, D.C., and visit the building Sept. 1 to complete final measurements of the space and designate the formal division between Savvis Center and Kiel. "Once we do that, we can execute our leases with Central Parking and Clear Channel."

San Antonio, Texas-based Clear Channel Communications Inc. agreed in 2003 to sign a 20-year lease for an undisclosed amount to manage Kiel and bring Broadway shows and other cultural events to the historic building. Central Parking Corp., based in Nashville, Tenn., signed a letter of intent in 2003 to lease Breckenridge's planned parking garage for more than $1 million over 10 years, Breckenridge said.

ctritto@bizjournals.com
__________________
"St. Louisan by choice, Missourian by geography"
My Photo Gallery Urban St.Louis.com Urban St.Louis forum
Citylover no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 15th, 2005, 02:00 AM   #109
Citylover
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: St. Louis (Chesterfield)
Posts: 118
Likes (Received): 0

Further details emerge of 28-story condo project in CWE
By Tim Woodcock
Posted Wednesday, September 14, 2005
West End Word

A second new high-rise for the Central West End is in the works. So far the plan appears to have the backing of Alderman Lyda Krewson and the mayor’s office — but as yet the neighborhood has not had a chance to weigh in on the issue.

At a Sept. 7 Tax Increment Financing Commission meeting Opus Northwest, the same company that is building Park East Tower, outlined its plans for a 28-story building at the intersection of Euclid Avenue and Lindell Boulevard.

The $92 million building would be at the northeast corner of the intersection, in a building opposite Schlafly Library that the American Heart Association owns. Opus has an option to buy the property.

As with nearby Park East Tower, the company would want to sell half the units before it breaks ground, said John Pitcher, Opus’ director of real estate development.

The 200 units would range in size from 875 to 1,575 square feet, he said. The average sales price of a unit would be approximately $360,000, compared to $600,000 at Park East Tower at Euclid and Laclede avenues, where the typical condo is much larger.

The idea of having 28 stories could be revisited, but Opus is committed to a 25- to 30-story building, Krewson said.

“I am concerned by the height,” said John Berglund, a member of the Central West End Association’s Planning and Development Committee. It would be no problem closer to Kingshighway, but in this location it might crowd out the smaller-scale buildings of Euclid Avenue, he said.
The committee has not formally looked at any plans for the building yet, Berglund said. The group meets each month and the project was not on the agenda at its Sept. 10 meeting.

The committee has an advisory role only, and it attempts to influence the city’s Cultural Resources Board and the aldermen if it is unhappy with elements of a project, Berglund said.

When the Park East Tower project was first announced it created controversy, with some residents complaining it would be out of proportion with the rest of the neighborhood. The committee did not have a chance to review that proposal until a deal was already sewn up, making its concerns moot, he said. That building, now under construction, is in Alderman Joe Roddy’s ward, whereas this one is in Lyda Krewson’s. To date Krewson has been much more forthcoming with information about the project, Berglund said.

“Sometimes we are more influential with smaller projects than with bigger ones,” Berglund said.

Pitcher said that it is important for Opus to get community input on the project at an early stage but the renderings are not ready to be released to the public. The proposed building would use brick and pre-cast panels on the outside and would be more conventional in look than Park East Tower, which is dominated by glass, Pitcher said.

“It makes our job much easier,” if a project has the backing of the neighborhood, he said. But “everyone has their own tastes and desires” and Opus would not submit to “design by committee,” he said.

The project, which has the working name Lindell Condominiums, has the backing of some key figures in city government.

“We are excited by this project,” said Barbara Geisman, speaking on behalf of the mayor’s office at the TIF meeting. “Opus has a good reputation across the country.”

Offering incentives now makes sense in the long run, Geisman argued — a large high-density building filled with residents who will patronize local businesses will replace a small building that is tax-exempt because of its ownership by a charity.

The company is asking for $9.5 million in TIF assistance. That amount is under negotiation, and the mayor’s office is hoping that the final figure will be “something under $9.5 million,” Geisman said.

“With the TIF the redevelopment project is not financially feasible and would not be developed,” states Opus’ application for TIF assistance.

However the same argument was made for Park East Tower, which went ahead without TIF assistance. Instead a community improvement district was set up and tax abatement was offered with a total value of $6.5 million to the company.

TIFs divert a portion of future taxes to pay for upfront redevelopment costs, and whether they work effectively is dependent on accurate projections about how much tax revenue a project will be generating five, 10 or 20 years from now.

The proposed timeline for paying back this TIF bond is unusually short at 11 to 12 years. TIFs can legally run for up to 23 years.

At the TIF Commission meeting Veronica O’Brien wanted to know how parking would be handled. The second to fifth stories would be set aside for secured, enclosed parking, with 8,000 square feet of ground-floor retail, Pitcher said.

Questions were also asked about the company’s track record regarding minority participation, a requirement in the city for projects that receive any kind of assistance using public money.

At Park East Tower the company will not come close to meeting minority-participation targets set by the city.

“We are a Minneapolis-based company. That project started there. We weren’t aware of it when we got started,” Pitcher said. “We [now] know the system.”

“What’s plan B?” asked TIF commissioner Sandy Whiteside, worried about the possibility of the project floundering if Opus does not pre-sell enough of the homes.

“It is not like we are going to give them the money,” Krewson said.
If the incremental increases in tax revenue do not occur as planned, developers do get the full amount of TIF money. “It is their money on the line,” not the city’s, she said.

The commission voted 5 to 0 to allow the project to proceed, with O’Brien abstaining.

The TIF Commission will next look at the project Nov. 2.
__________________
"St. Louisan by choice, Missourian by geography"
My Photo Gallery Urban St.Louis.com Urban St.Louis forum
Citylover no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 15th, 2005, 02:01 AM   #110
Citylover
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: St. Louis (Chesterfield)
Posts: 118
Likes (Received): 0

A nice overview of the area made by Arch City over at Urban St. Louis.
__________________
"St. Louisan by choice, Missourian by geography"
My Photo Gallery Urban St.Louis.com Urban St.Louis forum
Citylover no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2005, 08:47 AM   #111
Xing500
Registered User
 
Xing500's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: O'Fallon IL(ST LOUIS)/ CHICAGO IL
Posts: 179
Likes (Received): 0

Gateway Arch Connector / Freeway Lid (proposed)







Chouteau Lake (proposed)



The Bottle District (under construction)







Washington Avenue (Various Projects, completed, approved, and under construction)



New Busch Stadium (under construction)



Ballpark Village (approved, construction starts at end of baseball season)







Pinnacle Casino/Hotel/Entertainment area (under construction)





Cortex Technology Corridor (under construction)



Park East Tower (under construction)



Various Neigborhood Developments































Metrolink Expansion (cross county- under construction, others proposed)

__________________
XING
Xing500 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2005, 03:32 PM   #112
STLgasm
Live from red brick mama
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 376
Likes (Received): 1

Thank you Xing. St. Louis is rockin'.
STLgasm no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 1st, 2005, 10:43 AM   #113
Bond James Bond
Licence to kill.
 
Bond James Bond's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Apple Maggot Quarantine Area
Posts: 7,840

Quote:
Originally Posted by Citylover
Work begins on master plan for riverfront
Jim Merkel
Of the Suburban Journals
South City Journal

Improvements may be coming to the riverfront area near the Eads and Poplar Street bridges.

An advisory committee will begin work in May on a master plan for the area along the city's riverfront between Biddle Street, Chouteau Avenue, Leonor K. Sullivan Boulevard and the river to the east. The plan is expected to take a year to complete.

The Riverfront Advisory Committee will consist of a variety of local governmental officials, the Coast Guard, the Army Corps of Engineers and developers.

"There'll be an extensive public engagement process," said Todd Antoine, senior planner for the Great Rivers Greenway District.

. . .
OMG this is freaky . . . I used to have a roomate here in Seattle named "Jim Merkel" who was from the St. Louis area. I wonder if this is the same guy!
__________________
Posh
Bond James Bond está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old October 1st, 2005, 11:55 AM   #114
Xing500
Registered User
 
Xing500's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: O'Fallon IL(ST LOUIS)/ CHICAGO IL
Posts: 179
Likes (Received): 0

did he study journalism?
__________________
XING
Xing500 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 1st, 2005, 11:28 PM   #115
gych
BANNED
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 795
Likes (Received): 0

That bottle district looks cool. Havent heard of that, and I was just in the Lou in July! Where is that, and what does the project consist of? Any plans to amp up downtown retail?...it needs some more! I know Cordish is doing Ballpark Village which will be awesome but dont count on him to bring you more than entertainment (at least thats what they did here in Louisville, not enough retail in the Cordish dev. but good entertainment).
gych no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2005, 11:15 AM   #116
Bond James Bond
Licence to kill.
 
Bond James Bond's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Apple Maggot Quarantine Area
Posts: 7,840

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xing500
did he study journalism?
I'm not sure, but I seem to recall that he did write a story now and then for some sort of media, I think. When he was in Seattle, he was mostly the ultimate slacker. So he didn't really do much of anything.
__________________
Posh
Bond James Bond está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old October 6th, 2005, 08:56 AM   #117
Citylover
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: St. Louis (Chesterfield)
Posts: 118
Likes (Received): 0

Rattling skeletons of the North Riverfront Corridor
By Tavia Evans
ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
10/05/2005


North Broadway still feels 5 miles from downtown St. Louis rather than 5 blocks.

A bustling industrial corridor, just north of St. Louis' central business district, may hold the next promise for redevelopment.

The North Riverfront Business Corridor extends north of downtown along the Mississippi River. The area has long been home to diverse industries and businesses, some rooted in the city's past.

They include metal-processing plants, scrap yards and fabrication companies, steel factories, food distributors and Produce Row.

The empty hulls of large warehouses and vacant lots are common here, too, remnants of companies that moved or went out of business.

But the city and some developers see the potential for adding residential and commercial development.

Developer Kevin McGowan said his company, McGowan/Walsh, owns several groupings of old warehouses, just north of the site where Pinnacle Entertainment Inc. plans to build a $400 million casino, hotel and mixed-use complex on Laclede's Landing.

"Our plans are to put residential there," McGowan said. "But for now, we're taking a wait and see what happens with the area and the buildings along Broadway and east down to the river."

Stan Meoli said he almost sold his building at 2000 North Broadway last year. He runs American Warehouse, a shipping and receiving company that also leases storage and selling space in its 160,000-square-foot building to other companies. He's waiting now to cash in on the area's potential growth.

"We decided to hold onto the building when they said we'd have to update the sprinkler system for about $30,000" in order to sell it, Meoli said. "With everything going on downtown, if we sell it, it will be for $850,000."

The Missouri and Illinois transportation departments have proposed a new bridge to span the Mississippi River. It will cut a huge swath through several blocks of businesses in the area.

Barbara Geisman, deputy mayor for development, said "the area between the highway and the new bridge would be mixed-use going south, with new retail, office, and business and industrial continuing north."

Even with construction of the bridge, there still would be room to expand, said Carol Perry, president of the North Broadway Business Association.

"We have roughly about 110 businesses as part of the association, and most have indicated they want to grow and acquire more land in the area," Perry said.

That includes Anthony Tocco, president of M&L Foods Inc., who's looking to buy property next to his business at 1717 North Broadway. The company moved to its present location in 1985 after being displaced by construction of America's Center. Now, the food distributor sits in the path of the proposed bridge.

More recently, businesses have moved to the area for its large warehouse spaces, inexpensive land and easy access to transportation routes.

In search of more space, Walter and Marti Hauck moved their company, Zymo Sculpture Studio Inc., to 1520 North Broadway from the Central West End five years ago.

"It's been an interesting neighborhood to watch," said Marti Hauck, who handles the administrative side of the business while her husband sculpts and molds. "The area feels separate from downtown. But when you see the Arch, you definitely know where you are and you realize all the projects going on (downtown) aren't that far away."

Jack and Scott Larrison said they felt that someday, the downtown renaissance would creep farther north, so they bought two dilapidated buildings on North Broadway.

For 15 months, they gutted the insides, salvaging old wood from Mexican cedar, mahogany and maple fence posts left in the buildings to build a bar and adjacent garage. In September, they opened Shady Jack's at 1432 North Broadway.

"The area is up and coming, there's a lot of great potential here and we see it coming this way," Scott Larrison said.
__________________
"St. Louisan by choice, Missourian by geography"
My Photo Gallery Urban St.Louis.com Urban St.Louis forum
Citylover no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 7th, 2005, 08:18 AM   #118
Citylover
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: St. Louis (Chesterfield)
Posts: 118
Likes (Received): 0

Couple is brewing new life into beer factory
By Tavia Evans
ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
10/06/2005

A bicyclist passes by the former Centennial Malt House for Schnaider Brewery.

Wendy Hamilton thinks it was the arched entryways in the basement that caught her eye first, wide enough for the horse-drawn wagons that might have passed through the building in the late 19th century. Today, she thinks the space would be perfect for a lower-level wine shop.

Her husband, Paul Hamilton, can envision the views of the Arch and downtown St. Louis' skyline from the future rooftop terrace of a new restaurant - Vingt Dix Sept - the building's address in French.

At the moment, the building at 2017 Chouteau Avenue, bears little resemblance to their visions.

Built in 1876 and formerly home to the Centennial Malt House, it was an annex of the Joseph Schnaider Chouteau Avenue Brewery that lined the block of Chouteau and Mississippi avenues in the 1870s.

The Hamiltons are turning the two-story building into a banquet hall with a rooftop restaurant. Some office and retail space also might go into the 35,000-square-foot building, which they expect to have ready by April.

After several reincarnations, including storage for auto parts and a shade manufacturing company, the structure suffered from years of neglect and has been open to the elements.

It will cost $4 million to renovate the building and make it structurally sound. "The former owner thought we were crazy; he said we should tear it down," Wendy Hamilton said.

The couple has experience handling old structures. The Hamiltons renovated and own 1111 Mississippi, the Lafayette Square restaurant named for its address. It's housed in the former brewery's main building.

The Hamiltons paid $400,000 for the property on Chouteau in April.

Spiegelglass Construction Co. is the general contractor.

National City Bank is financing the project; a mix of state and federal historic tax credits also might help fund it.

With that in mind, the couple has applied for the building to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

"Their restaurant has been successful, and the location and facility they're proposing dovetails nicely with the other projects in the area" said Brian Davies, who brokered the deal for National City.

The building will need new electrical wiring and plumbing. Wooden structural beams made of rare Douglas fir hold up the inside of the building, but many will need to be replaced because of rot from exposure to water and weather.

On the rooftop, the couple say they'll build a deck and repair an L-shaped building that will become part of a French, bistro-style restaurant. An old grain chute, along with pieces of slate, wheels, pipes and parts scattered from a century ago will be incorporated into the building's design, Paul Hamilton said.

But the 129-year-old building is still revealing surprises, such as the bricked-up archways the couple found throughout the structure. A once-hidden tunnel in the basement leads to a bricked-up wall under Chouteau Avenue. The Hamiltons believe the tunnel might originally have been at street-level, back when the neighborhood bustled with business at the old brewery.
__________________
"St. Louisan by choice, Missourian by geography"
My Photo Gallery Urban St.Louis.com Urban St.Louis forum
Citylover no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 13th, 2005, 07:14 PM   #119
mjtinmemphis
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: St. Louis, Memphis, Nashville, Durham and Charlotte
Posts: 51
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by gych
Any plans to amp up downtown retail?...it needs some more!
The are plans. Rumors have Boarders moving in within the next 2 years on St. Charles street. Nothing major has been confirmed like marshalls or tj max. With the loft district moving into advanced stages of development and as the Old Post Office district starts taking form next year, we should begin to see better selection of retail.
mjtinmemphis no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 16th, 2005, 10:24 PM   #120
Kal_A
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Baltimore / London / St. Louis
Posts: 15
Likes (Received): 0

Is there any talk of a more full service grocery store than the one on Olive St (city grocer?)
Kal_A no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
st. louis

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 10:22 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like v3.2.5 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu