search the site
 daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Forums > Architecture > Classic Architecture

Classic Architecture Discussions on heritage buildings, monuments and landmarks.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old January 16th, 2012, 01:25 AM   #1
OakRidge
Registered User
 
OakRidge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: El Camino Real - California
Posts: 612
Likes (Received): 1092

The traditional architecture renaissance in the USA - Various examples highlighted

Some of you were enjoying my older posts so I thought I would highlight various recently completed buildings.

St. Martin's Episcopal Church - Houston, Texas‏ - Completed 2004

Exterior:

Source: http://www.pbase.com/artichoke/image/57010857/original

Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/baldheretic/2809007675/

Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/kt/130078750/

Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/baldheretic/2809374357/

Interior:

Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/28663259@N08/3666127070

Source: http://www.castingdesignsinc.com/Ima.../StMartins.htm

Source: http://www.castingdesignsinc.com/Ima.../StMartins.htm

Source: http://www.castingdesignsinc.com/Ima.../StMartins.htm

Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36950174@N02/3506776627/
__________________
"I had my back to the light and my face was turned towards
the things which it illumined, so that my eyes, by which I
saw the things which stood in the light, were themselves
in darkness." - Confessions (Book IV), Augustine of Hippo

"Laws are made for these reasons: that human wickedness
may be restrained through fear of their execution; that the
lives of innocent men may be safe among criminals; and
that the temptation to commit wrong may be restrained by
the fear of punishment." - The Visigothic Code (Book I, Title II, Part V)

iamtheSTIG liked this post
OakRidge no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old January 16th, 2012, 01:27 AM   #2
OakRidge
Registered User
 
OakRidge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: El Camino Real - California
Posts: 612
Likes (Received): 1092

Bavaro Hall, Curry School of Education, University of Virginia - Completed 2010

macjammer @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/jam5x/4915776025/




Richard T. Farmer School of Business, Miami University - Completed 2009

muohace_dc @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/cmstaley/5894539400/

Dec_Athlete @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/ceithcreekmur/5829104222/

Tec Inc @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/38277640@N02/4932945722/

Student and Academic Services Buildings, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - Completed 2007




North Quad Residential and Academic Complex, The University of Michigan - Completed 2010



__________________
"I had my back to the light and my face was turned towards
the things which it illumined, so that my eyes, by which I
saw the things which stood in the light, were themselves
in darkness." - Confessions (Book IV), Augustine of Hippo

"Laws are made for these reasons: that human wickedness
may be restrained through fear of their execution; that the
lives of innocent men may be safe among criminals; and
that the temptation to commit wrong may be restrained by
the fear of punishment." - The Visigothic Code (Book I, Title II, Part V)

iamtheSTIG liked this post
OakRidge no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 16th, 2012, 01:28 AM   #3
OakRidge
Registered User
 
OakRidge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: El Camino Real - California
Posts: 612
Likes (Received): 1092

2011 Brick in Architecture awards were recently released and here are some of the better submissions.




Quote:
Award: Bronze Award
Entry Name: Hopkins School, Thompson Hall
General Project Overview: Thompson Hall is a new 37,500-SF academic and arts building for Hopkins School, a 650 student independent day school, grades 7 through 12. The building’s primary function is to house classrooms for grades 7 and 8 as well as the visual arts and music departments which serve all grades. The opportunity to blend arts activities for all students within the academic home of the youngest students was seen as a distinct asset for the building. Large open classrooms, resource rooms and faculty offices occupy the top floors with bright commons space at both ends of the building. The lower level is arts-focused with four visual arts studios including a ceramics and woodworking space and two music rehearsal rooms accompanied by acoustically equipped practice rooms. Site features include an exterior 100 seat tiered amphitheater for musical performances on the west side of the building that helps to bring daylight to the lower level music studios. The traditional design of the building exterior has presented a glowing presence on the Hopkins Campus both inside and out. The intelligent use of special shapes for the detailing of this building is what makes the fašade stand out and be so attractive to the eye.



Quote:
Award: Gold Award
Entry Name: University of Notre Dame, Eck Hall of Law
General Project Overview: Administrators at the University of Notre Dame recognized that the existing Law School building was not adequate to support the School’s needs. S/L/A/M was asked to develop a new program and come up with a design solution that would accommodate the needs of the Law School while satisfying the preference for retaining the Law School at its current campus location with a linked expansion to an adjacent site. The selected option results in a new building to house the majority of teaching spaces as well as faculty offices and the Law School Commons. Additionally, the existing Law School complex was completely renovated to accommodate an expanded Law Library as well as Admissions, Law Reviews, Career Services and additional classrooms. The new construction is approximately 85,000 square feet and designed in such a way as to readily accept a future addition. It is organized around a central atrium with a mixture of classrooms and faculty office suites to maximize student/faculty interaction. The renovation of the existing 104,000-square foot Law School building provides a rationalized configuration for the Law Library. This is accomplished by reducing the current seven floor levels to four, with expanded collection space at the building core and reading rooms arrayed around the perimeter.



Quote:
Entry Name: The Brownstones at Park Potomac
General Project Overview: The project is in a mixed use (residential, commercial, retail) community. The first challenge was to define the residential style of architecture and the shape of the homes. The design warranted a tight urban community with a residential component in a fairly suburban broader environment. There was emphasis placed to create residential single family homes in an urban setting that will target and command a high price point. This factor warranted larger and wider homes. The solution was clear, a brownstone style of architecture. This approach works well in tighter urban settings at higher densities, while appealing to the more elegant affluent buyer with a richer style.
__________________
"I had my back to the light and my face was turned towards
the things which it illumined, so that my eyes, by which I
saw the things which stood in the light, were themselves
in darkness." - Confessions (Book IV), Augustine of Hippo

"Laws are made for these reasons: that human wickedness
may be restrained through fear of their execution; that the
lives of innocent men may be safe among criminals; and
that the temptation to commit wrong may be restrained by
the fear of punishment." - The Visigothic Code (Book I, Title II, Part V)

iamtheSTIG liked this post
OakRidge no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 16th, 2012, 01:29 AM   #4
OakRidge
Registered User
 
OakRidge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: El Camino Real - California
Posts: 612
Likes (Received): 1092

The Palladium in Carmel, Indiana. It was finished within the past year or so.


GK Photo @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/36026557@N05/5678017669/

GK Photo @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/36026557@N05/5678019015/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/36026557@N05/5678582718/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/36026557@N05/5678054501/
__________________
"I had my back to the light and my face was turned towards
the things which it illumined, so that my eyes, by which I
saw the things which stood in the light, were themselves
in darkness." - Confessions (Book IV), Augustine of Hippo

"Laws are made for these reasons: that human wickedness
may be restrained through fear of their execution; that the
lives of innocent men may be safe among criminals; and
that the temptation to commit wrong may be restrained by
the fear of punishment." - The Visigothic Code (Book I, Title II, Part V)
OakRidge no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 16th, 2012, 01:29 AM   #5
OakRidge
Registered User
 
OakRidge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: El Camino Real - California
Posts: 612
Likes (Received): 1092

The Carole Weinstein International Center at the University of Richmond. It was finished within the last year.


Kacie @ http://spiderdiaries.richmond.edu/kacie14/2010/10/08/

Kacie @ http://spiderdiaries.richmond.edu/kacie14/2010/10/08/

Kacie @ http://spiderdiaries.richmond.edu/kacie14/2010/10/08/
__________________
"I had my back to the light and my face was turned towards
the things which it illumined, so that my eyes, by which I
saw the things which stood in the light, were themselves
in darkness." - Confessions (Book IV), Augustine of Hippo

"Laws are made for these reasons: that human wickedness
may be restrained through fear of their execution; that the
lives of innocent men may be safe among criminals; and
that the temptation to commit wrong may be restrained by
the fear of punishment." - The Visigothic Code (Book I, Title II, Part V)
OakRidge no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 16th, 2012, 01:31 AM   #6
OakRidge
Registered User
 
OakRidge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: El Camino Real - California
Posts: 612
Likes (Received): 1092

The recently completed Brauer Hall at Washington University in St. Louis.


wustl @ http://news.wustl.edu/news/Pages/21165.aspx

Jeffrey Edward Tryon @ http://tryography.blogspot.com/2010/...-st-louis.html

wustl @ http://news.wustl.edu/news/Pages/21165.aspx

wustl @ http://news.wustl.edu/news/Pages/21165.aspx
__________________
"I had my back to the light and my face was turned towards
the things which it illumined, so that my eyes, by which I
saw the things which stood in the light, were themselves
in darkness." - Confessions (Book IV), Augustine of Hippo

"Laws are made for these reasons: that human wickedness
may be restrained through fear of their execution; that the
lives of innocent men may be safe among criminals; and
that the temptation to commit wrong may be restrained by
the fear of punishment." - The Visigothic Code (Book I, Title II, Part V)
OakRidge no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 16th, 2012, 01:32 AM   #7
OakRidge
Registered User
 
OakRidge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: El Camino Real - California
Posts: 612
Likes (Received): 1092

Meier Hall at Elmira College is finally finished.


Elmira College @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/elmiracollege/4662958677/

Elmira College @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/elmiracollege/4705753203/

Elmira College @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/elmiracollege/4706396550/

Elmira College @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/elmiracollege/4663581208/

Elmira College @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/elmiracollege/4616290991/

Simon Hall at Indiana University Bloomington

Brent A. Jones @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/brentajones/4875885748/

Brent A. Jones @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/brentajones/4875261135/

StevenW @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/helloev...23/3938150612/

Brent A. Jones @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/brentajones/4875888288/
__________________
"I had my back to the light and my face was turned towards
the things which it illumined, so that my eyes, by which I
saw the things which stood in the light, were themselves
in darkness." - Confessions (Book IV), Augustine of Hippo

"Laws are made for these reasons: that human wickedness
may be restrained through fear of their execution; that the
lives of innocent men may be safe among criminals; and
that the temptation to commit wrong may be restrained by
the fear of punishment." - The Visigothic Code (Book I, Title II, Part V)
OakRidge no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 16th, 2012, 01:32 AM   #8
OakRidge
Registered User
 
OakRidge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: El Camino Real - California
Posts: 612
Likes (Received): 1092

Completed a few months ago:

George Dean Johnson, Jr College of Business and Economics - Spartanburg, South Carolina

flounderman @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/flounde...mp/4896095043/

jennymunro @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/28150717@N06/4726546174/


Above from http://www.dmsas.com/Our_Portfolio/P...temId=6&pId=75
Quote:
Charged with a vital role in the economic redevelopment and reinvigoration of downtown Spartanburg, the 60,000 square foot, three-story George Dean Johnson, Jr. College of Business and Economics building will be the University of South Carolina Upstate’s first downtown. The College is adjacent to the recently completed David M. Schwarz Architects-designed Chapman Cultural Center, and thus its design reflects a compatibility with its next-door neighbor. The College includes a business incubator space for new ventures in addition to technology-enhanced classrooms and faculty offices. University and city officials see the College as an institution with great potential for the city of Spartanburg and a long-term commitment to higher education in the region. With respect to this long-term vision, the project is in the process of obtaining LEED certification and opened in June of 2010.
http://www.dmsas.com/Our_Portfolio/P...temId=6&pId=75
__________________
"I had my back to the light and my face was turned towards
the things which it illumined, so that my eyes, by which I
saw the things which stood in the light, were themselves
in darkness." - Confessions (Book IV), Augustine of Hippo

"Laws are made for these reasons: that human wickedness
may be restrained through fear of their execution; that the
lives of innocent men may be safe among criminals; and
that the temptation to commit wrong may be restrained by
the fear of punishment." - The Visigothic Code (Book I, Title II, Part V)
OakRidge no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 16th, 2012, 01:35 AM   #9
OakRidge
Registered User
 
OakRidge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: El Camino Real - California
Posts: 612
Likes (Received): 1092



Quote:
Whitman College is one of the six residential colleges at Princeton University, New Jersey, United States. The college is named after Meg Whitman, former CEO of eBay, following her $30 million donation to build the college. The structure was designed by architect Demetri Porphyrios. Construction of Whitman College was completed in Fall of 2007; 2007–08 marked the inaugural academic year for the college.

Whitman is a four-year residential college, open to students of all four academic classes. Its sister two-year college is Forbes College. Although it is possible for any upperclassman to live in Whitman, priority for housing is given to those those upperclassmen who lived in either Whitman or Forbes as underclassmen.

The master of Whitman is Harvey S. Rosen, the John L. Weinberg Professor of Economics and Business Policy. The Dean is Dr. Rebecca Graves-Bayazitoglu, the former Director of Studies for Rockefeller College. The Director of Studies is Dr. Cole M. Crittenden, the former Allston Burr Resident Dean of Currier House at Harvard University. The Director of Student Life is Christina Davis. Josue Lajeunesse, a custodian at Whitman College, is a main subject of the documentary film The Philosopher Kings, and is also an active humanitarian working to make clean water accessible to the people of his home village of Lasource, Haiti.

The residential college comprises seven dormitories: South Baker Hall, Hargadon Hall, Fisher Hall, Lauritzen Hall, Class of 1981 Hall, Murley-Pivirotto Family Tower, and North Hall. The college's dining hall is called Community Hall, so named not for the University community but rather for the eBay community.

One of the more unique aspects of the Whitman College system is its tradition of weekly "College Night" dinners, sponsored by the Whitman College Council and open to Whitman residents only. College Nights involve a number of different themes including Carnival, Halloween, and even a dinner themed after the NBC series "The Office". College Night dinners are popular among Whitman students but have sparked some controversy among the rest of the Princeton community.

Whitman College participates in seasonal intramural athletics, including soccer, volleyball and Ultimate Frisbee. Whitman also organizes a variety of other recreational activities, including a craft circle and the Jane Austen literary society.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whitman...ton_University
__________________
"I had my back to the light and my face was turned towards
the things which it illumined, so that my eyes, by which I
saw the things which stood in the light, were themselves
in darkness." - Confessions (Book IV), Augustine of Hippo

"Laws are made for these reasons: that human wickedness
may be restrained through fear of their execution; that the
lives of innocent men may be safe among criminals; and
that the temptation to commit wrong may be restrained by
the fear of punishment." - The Visigothic Code (Book I, Title II, Part V)
OakRidge no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 16th, 2012, 01:36 AM   #10
OakRidge
Registered User
 
OakRidge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: El Camino Real - California
Posts: 612
Likes (Received): 1092

Two recently completed townhouses at Chicago's Lincoln Park.


Quote:
These two townhouses were built on spec in Chicago's Lincoln Park, just north of the Loop, and designed by Timothy LeVaughn. Congratulations to him for this excellent work. He is an architect and partner in Melrose Partners. Its web site suggests that the firm does much rehab work in old residential buildings in Chicago, but these two buildings are brand new.

Melrose is a design-build firm, which means the eyebrows of most architects are raised. I'm not sure why, but here is Wikipedia's take on design-build. Apparently the general idea is to cut out the architectural firm as an independent contractor, and use architects hired directly by the building company. Design-build is considered an inroad on the power and prestige of pure architecture, but if it can produce such a high quality of work, then I say bring it on.

http://news.beloblog.com/ProJo_Blogs...nstructio.html
Recently completed Le Virage luxury townhomes at Habersham, SC.



Macatawa Bank in Holland, Michigan, completed in 2006.



Rhodes College Library, completed in 2005.



Alvarado Transportation Center, completed in 2006

__________________
"I had my back to the light and my face was turned towards
the things which it illumined, so that my eyes, by which I
saw the things which stood in the light, were themselves
in darkness." - Confessions (Book IV), Augustine of Hippo

"Laws are made for these reasons: that human wickedness
may be restrained through fear of their execution; that the
lives of innocent men may be safe among criminals; and
that the temptation to commit wrong may be restrained by
the fear of punishment." - The Visigothic Code (Book I, Title II, Part V)
OakRidge no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 16th, 2012, 01:38 AM   #11
OakRidge
Registered User
 
OakRidge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: El Camino Real - California
Posts: 612
Likes (Received): 1092

St. John Neumann - Farragut, Tennessee
Architect: HDB/Cram & Ferguson




Quote:
Henry Edwards
St. John Neumann Church has the most elaborate stained glass program of any recently constructed U.S. church I’ve heard of, and fortunately it has been pretty comprehensively documented in both image and word. It was carefully and consciously designed to tell as much of the content and history of the Catholic faith as possible, and to explicitly support the liturgy offered within the church. However, this content is not easily located at the sjnknox.org web site, so let me give a few clues.

In the Nave (God’s Plan and the 7 Sacraments)
http://sjnknox.org/content/view/78/2/

The Stations of the Cross
http://sjnknox.org/content/view/29/2/

The Dome and Penditives
http://sjnknox.org/content/view/27/2/

These pages just scratch the surface of the overall plan. Now go back to the “art directory” page

http://sjnknox.org/content/view/213/1/

and scroll down past the half dozen construction photos at the top until you see

Click on the below items for close-up views of our church art and architectural features.

Then you can begin to get into detail like

Clerestory Windows (the 20 Mysteries of the Rosary)
http://sjnknox.org/content/view/18/2/
__________________
"I had my back to the light and my face was turned towards
the things which it illumined, so that my eyes, by which I
saw the things which stood in the light, were themselves
in darkness." - Confessions (Book IV), Augustine of Hippo

"Laws are made for these reasons: that human wickedness
may be restrained through fear of their execution; that the
lives of innocent men may be safe among criminals; and
that the temptation to commit wrong may be restrained by
the fear of punishment." - The Visigothic Code (Book I, Title II, Part V)
OakRidge no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 16th, 2012, 01:39 AM   #12
OakRidge
Registered User
 
OakRidge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: El Camino Real - California
Posts: 612
Likes (Received): 1092













pak152 at http://www.flickr.com/photos/pak152/...7612302891734/

Quote:
Thursday, October 08, 2009
NLM Interview with Ethan Anthony, President of Architectural Firm HDB/Cram and Ferguson
by Shawn Tribe

We have featured the work of architect Ethan Anthony and HDB/Cram and Ferguson, an architectural firm which is based out of Boston, Massachusetts, many times here on the NLM.

I have often been struck by the qualitative design and materials that are put into this firm's work. Of course this is not unique only to this firm, for we have also shown many fine examples of the work of other architects as well, including the stunning work of Duncan Stroik as just one example. One aspect that did strike me as rather more unique to this firm, however, is that it seemed to more consciously pursue the gothic form. This, along with the natural materials used in the building these same churches, piqued my curiosity and I determined to pursue an interview with Mr. Anthony in order to gain some sense of the principles and philosophy which informs their work.

Here is that interview.

Mr. Anthony, can you give us a little background about yourself and your firm?

Ralph Adams Cram founded the firm in 1889 and it has been in continuous practice since then. The firm has completed hundreds of new churches and additions and other projects in 44 state and France, Canada, Cuba and Panama. Much of the firm’s early renovation work was converting churches of various denominations from the dominant American Protestant style (Catholic churches were also often built in Protestant style) to a style based on orthodox Catholic liturgy. Up until Cram even Catholic churches in this country looked like congregational churches. Cram was smitten with the Catholic liturgy he saw in Italy and worked much of his life to return American liturgy to a Roman Catholic basis.

Part of that process was a revival of Catholic architectural styles including both Romanesque and Gothic. I came to the firm in 1991. When I arrived most of the practice was commercial architecture with a few church related projects. The firm’s most recent Gothicist had been John Doran and Alexander Hoyle and they died during the 1960’s. When I saw the body of work and the quality of the drawings I resolved to reinvigorate the church practice and now nineteen years later our practice is entirely religious and church related academic.

I was educated by the Jesuits at Xavier High School in Concord, MA and finished my architectural degree at the University of Oregon. I spent my first three years out of architecture school working at Payette Associates a prominent medical architecture firm here in Boston. I practiced independently for 7 years and then joined the firm which was then known as Hoyle, Doran & Berry, Inc; formerly Cram and Ferguson. That proved unwieldy as a name and I shortened it to HDB/Cram and Ferguson, Inc.

Many firms today operate within the context of a classical or Romanesque idiom, though yours seems to be more weighted toward a medieval, or gothic, form of building, is this merely incidental, or does your firm wish to focus on the gothic style?

Cram believed that the highest point of development of Catholic architecture was Gothic and that it had been cut short by the Reformation. He dedicated his life to designing new Gothic architecture because he saw it as a re-birth of Catholic architecture that could carry on to new heights and could have positive impact on the morality of our civilization. I agree with Cram that Gothic is the highest form of Catholic architecture and that it is by far the most beautiful spiritual architecture. Both Cram and I have clients who love Romanesque and who demand it and we both comply.

Who and what would you cite as particular influences in your design work?

I have studied all of the classical Gothic masters as represented by their churches. The greatest are unquestionably the French Masters who began what was known as “the style” that spread around the world. In France my favorite is Notre Dame but I also love Rheims, Rouen, Amiens, Chartres, Laon, in Italy; Li Duomi in Milan and Firenze, San Miniato, St. John Lateran, Assisi, San Marco, San Galgano; in Spain; Cordoba, Sevilla, Leon, Santiago de Compostela, in England; Glalstonbury, Rievaulx, Fountains, Bath Abbey, St. George’s, Windsor, just to name a few highlights.

What would be your thought on the gothic revivalists such as AWN Pugin, Sir Ninian Comper or G.F. Bodley?

We owe a tremendous debt to the Pugins. Father and Son were responsible for the revival in Gothic architecture and preserving and reviving Catholic architecture and liturgy more than any others. A. W. N. Pugin b.1812 (an Anglican convert to Catholicism in 1834) as the champion of Catholic Architecture in England following his conversion and the Catholic emancipation Act of 1836, inspired his contemporary Scott who inspired the next generation Bodley b.1827, who inspired the much younger Comper b. 1864 (a contemporary of Cram but practicing almost exclusively in England) who traced their inspiration back to the course set by Pugin. All of the followers of Pugin were High Church Anglicans including Cram. As Cram certainly did I have looked back to Pugin as a resource. I have his books and use them in my work.

Do you have an "ideal" church?

No, and that is important. Each parish is unique and the building should reflect the interests and liturgy of the parish and the time. In this way the parish gives live to the building. I think that is one thing that separates me from many architects. We do not arrive at the parish with a powerful bias for one style or another. I doubt we would be hired to design a Big Box church and I have no interest in that but any church that wants an interesting church based on faithful tradition and precedent and true spiritual values interests me.

This said, if there were architectural elements you would be interested in seeing a revival of, what might they be? For example, within the past two centuries, we saw the revival of elements like the rood screen as well as the ciborium magnum in other instances. Do you have any particular interests in this way and if so, can you explain what informs those interests?

I am a big fan of elaborate altar pieces, Baldacchini and assorted art work including mosaic and fresco and anything that puts the focus on the altar. I also like engaged altars and enjoy designing stone altars with carved panels.

Two churches which particularly stand out as products of your firm are Syon Abbey and Our Lady of Walsingham, churches which are noteworthy for their use of timber in the roof or porches, and which employ stone in their exterior and even interior construction -- materials which are more historically rooted in this style. Is their a philosophy or set of principles behind this?

Yes there is a set of principles. Some are carryovers from the firm such as honest use of materials, faithful expression of the liturgy and an emphasis on a search for beauty in mass and line and material. To that I would add a willingness to help the parish attain beauty at a reasonable cost. It is easier to achieve beauty when no mundane materials need be used and no expense is to be spared. In the practical world of parish architecture one must achieve beauty by sparing use of expensive material and thoughtful design.

Can you speak more to this principle of the "honest use of materials" as well as the "faithful expression of the liturgy"?

Materials are our palette and in parish work we must be very restrained in using expensive materials. We use some substitute materials and we use strategic placement of small quantities of high quality materials. We do not give up on providing the material that is expected. The ceiling is wood, the walls are stone. The materials chosen are selected because they can be produced economically with modern methods. For example we use small amounts of cut stone and large amounts of split which is less costly.

By faithful expression of the liturgy I mean expressing the liturgy and not our design of the liturgy. It is all about leaving our ego out and focusing on the message.

Many are bound to ask however, is not building with such materials not substantially more expensive?

It is more expensive than Strip Mall or Big Box Church or International Style Modernesque. As a general rule we use natural materials in place of man-made materials. We avoid materials that are inherently toxic or energy intensive like vinyl and plastics and brick. We do ship materials over great distances but also always consider locally available alternatives.

What do you see as the particular challenges for architects today who are trying to design in a spirit of continuity within the context of the Latin rite?

The greatest challenge is at the parish level. We are consultants and as such we serve the parish. The parish drives the liturgy within their church and in practice this is often the Pastor. In some cases it can be the Director of Liturgy but each church has a different situation and we typically discuss alternatives such as placement of the altar and Baptismal Font and provision of a communion rail with them during design. I try to make them aware of the historical and liturgical background so that they can achieve authenticity in their church but the decisions are ultimately made by the parish. I believe our role is to educate so that the client can make an informed decision. We are not crusading for ad orientam or communion rails or kneeling communion or any other specific liturgical usage. I am crusading for the employment of all the beauty, treasure and love the parish can offer and all the beauty, knowledge, authenticity, integrity, tastefulness and restraint I can bring to the design, construction and decoration I can bring to the building of their church.

These are difficult and highly emotional matters and it requires both sensitivity and courage on the part of the parish and the Architect to achieve a good solution.

In the West there is often an expressed concern about not being simply "revivalist" -- which is to say, not simply reproducing earlier historical styles. What are your own thoughts about this? Further, what, in your estimation, were some of the lost opportunities of the 20th century as it regards sacred architecture? Where have we succeeded and where have we, arguably, failed and what lessons might we take from this going forward?

The whole debate about revival began in the inception of the modernist period when the new modernist architects and their supporters tried to ridicule the traditionalist architects and traditional architecture with claims that their work was not genuine because it was not original. This argument set up a straw man, originality, as a test that had to be passed to claim relevance and that traditional architecture simply did not meet. It was the one real moment of genius of the modernist movement. It took fifty years 1925-1975 for architectural traditionalists to develop an effective counter argument.

In the meantime much of America’s traditionalist architecture was demolished through urban renewal. Many of the buildings demolished were based on Christian Romanesque church architecture including countless Richardsonian Romanesque town halls and railroad stations, and the largely Romanesque human-scale residential blocks of Boston’s West End, so powerful was the anti-traditionalist windstorm. They were largely replaced with “International Style” buildings that very deliberately eschewed Christian symbolism.

This anti-Christian and anti-symbolism storm gained strength beginning with the end of World War II and only began to die out in the 1980’s after Post-modernism re-legitimized quotational architecture as in the work of Charles Moore and Michael Graves. Their association with the Princeton architecture school made them unassailable by the promoters and protectors of modernism and Philip Johnson’s conversion with the AT&T building sealed the fate of modernism. Their work was non-religious but they opened the way for religious architects to begin using religious symbolism in buildings again. Ever since modernist architecture has been a distinguishable style with a beginning and (at last) an end. I identify all modernist architecture after 1985 as Modernesque since it too is imitating and copying something. In Colombia for example traditional Spanish Colonial buildings have all but disappeared in many cities to be replaced by leaden Corbusier and Mies knock-offs.

The current architectural traditionalist movement which I call the Third Revival, is really an outgrowth of Post-Modernism. Architects are once again free to use symbolism, even religious symbolism in their buildings. Art is also OK as is the contribution of the artist and the craftsman in making the building. The danger is that architects who have not studied or are insensitive to the intrinsic meaning of the symbols they use will use them incorrectly or inappropriately. Symbols from Roman architecture that once celebrated the Pagan gods, for example, used on a baseball stadium as decoration.

Are there any final thoughts you would like to aspiring and budding young architects who would like to design churches?

Five years ago I wrote an article for Sacred Architecture called “A Long Last Look at American Sacred Architecture” in which I lamented the demise of good religious architecture and its replacement with flying saucers, sheds and barns. When I wrote that article had already designed and built three new traditional churches. Five years later we have built another and designed two more churches and a new seminary as well as a number of smaller projects for furnishings and alterations to restore traditional church interiors destroyed during the last fifty years.

There is still just one school of architecture in this country that teaches the design of traditional religious architecture, the University of Notre Dame. None of the others feel it is important enough to include it in their curriculum but that is a reflection of the ambivalence of the public toward traditional religious architecture. It is still true that future generations will judge us by the buildings we leave just as we judge past generations by the same measure. We have made a step in the direction of a more responsible and responsive architecture but the people must make the choice every day whether they will support us in this quest.

We have seen traditional religious design projects put on hold in a few parts of the country as the recession has impacted parishes. This is the opposite reaction to that of past generations who pushed forward with their plans in defiance of the great depression. For this fledgling movement to survive the architects and designers who have committed themselves to restoring traditional religious architecture need employment. If the parishes who want to build in traditional styles do not push forward with their projects in spite of the recession this movement will die and it will have been the Long Last Look. The University of Notre Dame is producing young architects who want to design and build beautiful new churches, our country must provide them with the opportunity to build new churches. The parishes must move ahead with their plans to build if they are to be able to realize their dreams.

* * *

To learn more about the work of the HDB/Cram and Ferguson, please visit their website: www.hdb.com


http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org...n-anthony.html
__________________
"I had my back to the light and my face was turned towards
the things which it illumined, so that my eyes, by which I
saw the things which stood in the light, were themselves
in darkness." - Confessions (Book IV), Augustine of Hippo

"Laws are made for these reasons: that human wickedness
may be restrained through fear of their execution; that the
lives of innocent men may be safe among criminals; and
that the temptation to commit wrong may be restrained by
the fear of punishment." - The Visigothic Code (Book I, Title II, Part V)
OakRidge no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 16th, 2012, 01:51 AM   #13
JohnnyMass
Whatever
 
JohnnyMass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Porto
Posts: 46,223
Likes (Received): 1430


Source

Excellent!...
__________________
Edit my Signature
JohnnyMass no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 16th, 2012, 02:12 AM   #14
tommolo
Registered User
 
tommolo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Milano
Posts: 4,076
Likes (Received): 2699

Excellent, absolutely excellent! Here I must say that the palladium by schwartz wins in originality, class and contemporaneity! Thank you very much, it's a kind of a warmth to the heart the feeling you get when you enjoy those buildings. I don't know about the rigid and orthodox moralistics that have a fanatical faith in modernism only but I, as a contemporary young man incline to pluralism and to accept any position as never wrong from the start, have to confess that this is great architecture to me. And more, I have to say that this style, whatever will it be called, it's perfectly contemporary! It's TODAY! It have its own style! Its own language! I hope this new wave will lead to finish the many incomplete cathedrals, palaces and castles we have here in Italy!

Last edited by tommolo; January 16th, 2012 at 02:18 AM.
tommolo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 16th, 2012, 02:13 AM   #15
OakRidge
Registered User
 
OakRidge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: El Camino Real - California
Posts: 612
Likes (Received): 1092

Another by Schwartz:

Spartanburg Day School


Source: http://www.dmsas.com/#_project_60

Source: http://www.goupstate.com/article/201...cles/108181008

Source: http://www.dmsas.com/#_project_60
__________________
"I had my back to the light and my face was turned towards
the things which it illumined, so that my eyes, by which I
saw the things which stood in the light, were themselves
in darkness." - Confessions (Book IV), Augustine of Hippo

"Laws are made for these reasons: that human wickedness
may be restrained through fear of their execution; that the
lives of innocent men may be safe among criminals; and
that the temptation to commit wrong may be restrained by
the fear of punishment." - The Visigothic Code (Book I, Title II, Part V)
OakRidge no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 16th, 2012, 02:28 AM   #16
OakRidge
Registered User
 
OakRidge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: El Camino Real - California
Posts: 612
Likes (Received): 1092

Schermerhorn Symphony Center


Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/therichardlife/4490389164/

Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jsrice00/3960728096/

Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/chrisgent/3008483646/

Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/sduck409/5312435307/

Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/53262004@N00/163746570/

Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/53262004@N00/163746571/

Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/falling...23/5450629427/
__________________
"I had my back to the light and my face was turned towards
the things which it illumined, so that my eyes, by which I
saw the things which stood in the light, were themselves
in darkness." - Confessions (Book IV), Augustine of Hippo

"Laws are made for these reasons: that human wickedness
may be restrained through fear of their execution; that the
lives of innocent men may be safe among criminals; and
that the temptation to commit wrong may be restrained by
the fear of punishment." - The Visigothic Code (Book I, Title II, Part V)

Last edited by OakRidge; January 16th, 2012 at 09:30 PM.
OakRidge no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 16th, 2012, 02:55 AM   #17
JohnnyMass
Whatever
 
JohnnyMass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Porto
Posts: 46,223
Likes (Received): 1430

Beautiful! How can someone prefer glass boxes to this I truly have a hard time understanding...
__________________
Edit my Signature
JohnnyMass no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 16th, 2012, 03:07 AM   #18
Krases
Registered User
 
Krases's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Vegas
Posts: 62
Likes (Received): 29

Maybe not entirely traditional, but traditionally inspired. Smoth Center for the arts in Las Vegas finishing construction soon.

Krases no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 16th, 2012, 04:06 AM   #19
OakRidge
Registered User
 
OakRidge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: El Camino Real - California
Posts: 612
Likes (Received): 1092

Weill Hall, University of Michigan

Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/eridony/3943369600/

Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/eridony/3943368794/

Jackson County Judicial Center

Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/kycourts/549616992/

Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jstephenconn/6107231807/

Shelby County Judicial Center

Source: http://www.sentinelnews.com/content/...hen-pure-bliss

Source: http://courts.ky.gov/courthousegalleries/shelby/

Green County Courthouse

Source: http://www.wasco-inc.com/gallerys/gr...unty-thumb.jpg
__________________
"I had my back to the light and my face was turned towards
the things which it illumined, so that my eyes, by which I
saw the things which stood in the light, were themselves
in darkness." - Confessions (Book IV), Augustine of Hippo

"Laws are made for these reasons: that human wickedness
may be restrained through fear of their execution; that the
lives of innocent men may be safe among criminals; and
that the temptation to commit wrong may be restrained by
the fear of punishment." - The Visigothic Code (Book I, Title II, Part V)
OakRidge no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 16th, 2012, 07:14 PM   #20
gdlrar
Registered User
 
gdlrar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Fire Nation
Posts: 2,640
Likes (Received): 1279

OH my god! wow... im speechless, the american knows best!
gdlrar no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
classic architecture, united states of america

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 11:11 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2016 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2016 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu