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Old June 1st, 2013, 07:41 PM   #101
rocker123
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I think one of the reasons why we abandoned the Spanish language as well is that during the revolution Our National Hero wanted the Philippines to a state or part of Spain and recieve benifits but they did not accept the idea and neither did they accept the idea of us not being their colony as well ; so probably when they sold us it must have brought a big psychological or emotional impact that ones again they were used, sold and abandoned by spain this would have probably changed the perspective of Filipinos towards the Spanish making the dislike and anger towards the Spanish bigger. during the 40s the filipinos saw new hope and admired the Americans for they promised of giving them freedom and all the while Spain was in chaos and civil war.

From that point on they preferred the people who gave them freedom rather than the ones who imprisoned them

pls correct if i said something wrong
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Old June 1st, 2013, 08:21 PM   #102
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OtAkAw View Post

Only 1.8 million Filipinos are able to speak Spanish, that's out of a total population of almost a hundred million people. An additional 1.2 million speak Chavacano, a Spanish-based creole language that sounds just like Spanish to the untrained ear.

At the start of the 20th century, Spanish was flourishing in the country just years after independence from Spain. Then the Americans came and imposed English as a medium of instruction in schools. By the 1940's Spanish was in decline. Then World War 2 came and ravaged Manila, where most of the country's Spanish speakers resided (and unfortunately got killed, the language along with them). It went downhill from then. By the 1970's it was taken out of the school curriculum and by 1987, it was stripped of its official language status.

Today Spanish exists as the "language of the elite", mostly old-money rich Filipinos with Spanish ancestry speak it. Though thousands of Spanish loanwords have found their way into the scores of languages in the Philippines. Examples are kutsara, lamesa, bentilador, kama, sabon, tinidor, libro, kasilya, plantsa, misa de gallo, Noche Buena, delicadeza, amor propio, palabra de honor, panaderya, and many more.
Although I read somewhere that during the Filipino-American war, which saw the creation of the Philippines as a colony of the U.S., the Americans strategically targeted many areas where the Spanish language flourished as to impose English with the least resistance as possible. This was due to the fact that many Spanish speakers lost their lives during that turmoil.
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Old June 2nd, 2013, 06:23 AM   #103
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That's a really intresting subject. In Puerto Rico americans did the same as in the Phillipines and Hawaií and today, according to the latest study only 10% of Puerto Ricans who live in the island are bilingual. That means that 90% of Puerto Ricans do not speak english or if they do so, are not proficient. The entire population speaks spanish at home.That's a 2013 study.

I think that maybe because we're geographically and culturally close to Latin America spanish kept it's importance. But the american authorities of that time, did almost excactly the same. In fact it was until 1950 that english was the language of instruction in every public school in Puerto Rico. Now english is taught as a second language. Without spanish probably the puerto rican culture would be dead.
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Old June 2nd, 2013, 06:37 AM   #104
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Argentina


Tigre


Av de Mayo, Buenos Aires


Recoleta, Buenos Aires


Hotel Llao Llao, Bariloche


Lago Nahuel Huapi, Bariloche


Museo de Arte, Tigre


Ushuaia
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Old June 2nd, 2013, 06:46 AM   #105
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Q View Post
That's a really intresting subject. In Puerto Rico americans did the same as in the Phillipines and Hawaií and today, according to the latest study only 10% of Puerto Ricans who live in the island are bilingual. That means that 90% of Puerto Ricans do not speak english or if they do so, are not proficient. The entire population speaks spanish at home.That's a 2013 study.

I think that maybe because we're geographically and culturally close to Latin America spanish kept it's importance. But the american authorities of that time, did almost excactly the same. In fact it was until 1950 that english was the language of instruction in every public school in Puerto Rico. Now english is taught as a second language. Without spanish probably the puerto rican culture would be dead.
Are you puerto rican and if so what do you think non binding referendum of last year on statehood
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Old June 2nd, 2013, 12:52 PM   #106
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rocker123 View Post
I think one of the reasons why we abandoned the Spanish language as well is that during the revolution Our National Hero wanted the Philippines to a state or part of Spain and recieve benifits but they did not accept the idea and neither did they accept the idea of us not being their colony as well ; so probably when they sold us it must have brought a big psychological or emotional impact that ones again they were used, sold and abandoned by spain this would have probably changed the perspective of Filipinos towards the Spanish making the dislike and anger towards the Spanish bigger. during the 40s the filipinos saw new hope and admired the Americans for they promised of giving them freedom and all the while Spain was in chaos and civil war.

From that point on they preferred the people who gave them freedom rather than the ones who imprisoned them

pls correct if i said something wrong
I think you are wrong . Spain did not sell the Philippines. The lost of Philippines was a consequence of the Spanish-American war, in which the U.S. attacked the remaining Spanish colonial possessions in America and Pacific (Cuba, Puerto Rico, Philippines, Guam...). After the war finished, the U. S. took control over Philippines (after the Philippine–American War).

You can find more information in Wikipedia: Spanish-American War.
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Old June 2nd, 2013, 02:35 PM   #107
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I agree with the last remark. The Philippines were lost as spoils of war. If Spain and the US would have never gone to war then just maybe the Philippines would have gone to war directly with Spain to get their independence, just like every other colonies in the Americas. Regardless of what happened I think that Filipinos alike shouldn't forget their past and embrace it since most of their founding father's spoke Spanish.
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Old June 2nd, 2013, 10:32 PM   #108
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Quote:
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Are you puerto rican and if so what do you think non binding referendum of last year on statehood
Yes I am, and about the referendum, it consisted of two questions. The first one asked if we aprooved the current political status between US and PR. the second one asked wich option do you want statehood, independence or free asociation according to the UN resolutions.

In the first question the mayority voted against the current political status. In the second question statehood ''won''. I'll not try to explain how controversial this referendum was in Puerto Rico. It's a highly sensitive issue in the island. Now the Congress should start a process, but I have no hope they do anything. After 115 year of american rule in the island they've done nothing, and I don't think the want to do anything, they like it just as it is. I think the political status is a major problem for us puerto ricans, not for them. As you said is a NON BINDING REFERENDUM wich means basically they have the last word like always...Of course, everything was poluted by cheap and disgussting partisan politics always concern about winning election for their own benefit. It's a sad situation.

For the record I voted for indepence. From my puerto rican perspective I defend spanish as the language of Puerto Rico, english for me is just a useful second language anybody should learn, without jeopardizing the use of spanish.
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Old June 3rd, 2013, 02:40 AM   #109
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Q View Post

Yes I am, and about the referendum, it consisted of two questions. The first one asked if we aprooved the current political status between US and PR. the second one asked wich option do you want statehood, independence or free asociation according to the UN resolutions.

In the first question the mayority voted against the current political status. In the second question statehood ''won''. I'll not try to explain how controversial this referendum was in Puerto Rico. It's a highly sensitive issue in the island. Now the Congress should start a process, but I have no hope they do anything. After 115 year of american rule in the island they've done nothing, and I don't think the want to do anything, they like it just as it is. I think the political status is a major problem for us puerto ricans, not for them. As you said is a NON BINDING REFERENDUM wich means basically they have the last word like always...Of course, everything was poluted by cheap and disgussting partisan politics always concern about winning election for their own benefit. It's a sad situation.

For the record I voted for indepence. From my puerto rican perspective I defend spanish as the language of Puerto Rico, english for me is just a useful second language anybody should learn, without jeopardizing the use of spanish.
I agree with what you said about the possibility of Congress not acting upon the outcome of the referendum. Like you said it is non binding. And for Puerto ricans to say that nobody but Puerto ricans should have a say in it is fallacious since Americans on the mainland would probably have to pay more in taxes to support another state, so they also gave something at stake. I applaud your decision of upholding independence as a viable option because I think that more than anything people there are willing to sell their dignity and tradition just for a few benefits.
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Old June 3rd, 2013, 07:23 PM   #110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moon Child View Post
I agree with what you said about the possibility of Congress not acting upon the outcome of the referendum. Like you said it is non binding. And for Puerto ricans to say that nobody but Puerto ricans should have a say in it is fallacious since Americans on the mainland would probably have to pay more in taxes to support another state, so they also gave something at stake. I applaud your decision of upholding independence as a viable option because I think that more than anything people there are willing to sell their dignity and tradition just for a few benefits.
It's true. The only place Puerto ricans can call ''home'' is Puerto Rico. You can move to any other place, even if the're many puerto ricans in the mainland but it's not the same, it's not home. That's why I voted for independence because I think that after 520 years of colonial rule in Puerto Rico is time to take our future in our own hands. Sadly I'm a minority, but that doesn't mean we're wrong. It means we need to send the messege...
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Old June 16th, 2013, 11:30 PM   #111
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The United States of America (USA).

Most of the times, people seem to forget that large chunks of the USA were part of the Spanish Empire, and that actually the oldest towns in the USA used to be old Spanish colonial towns.

But there´s still bits to see, despite the earthquakes in California, the tornados and hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico, and the renovations all over the USA.

Of all the current US states that had been part of the Spanish Empire, and not counting Puerto Rico and Guam (which are not what everybody has in mind when thinking about the USA), Spain only lost Florida to the USA, we sold it in 1821. The rest was lost to Mexico in 1821 (and some twenty years later Mexico would lose it to the USA), or to France (Louisiana, who would sell it to the USA).

We also had a little thing in Oregon/Washington state/British Columbia, but very small and we lost it quickly because the Russians, the British and the US Americans got their hands on it.

So... where to start?

Well, why not the biggest old Spanish city? None other than...














Los Angeles (California)


Who on Earth would have guessed that what was by 1821, when Spain lost Mexico (and thus the Upper California province too), just a small village of less than 1,000 souls, would end up becoming the second biggest city of the USA after New York?



Wikipedia: Zink Dawg

These are houses built when LA was already part of the US, but Spain is obviously still present in the architecture, notably on the oldest of the three (the Masonic Hall -the one on the right-, from 1858, built just ten years after LA became part of the USA, and only 37 years after this was no longer Spain, but Mexico).
The other two are from 1870, so they show a bit more of strict USA/UK influence, though the Spain influence is still evident too (but less so than on the one on the right).



Wikipedia: Los Angeles



The oldest church in LA, from the XVIIIth century (albeit modified many times):



Wikipedia: Eot1986



The Pico House (originally a hotel, built for Pío Pico, last Spanish Governor of the Alta California province, born Spanish, lived as a Mexican for 27 years, died as a citizen of the USA).
You can see it on the first picture of the post, the house is from 1870:



Wikipedia: Jon Narong



The Ávila house, built in adobe, thus its current name of Avila Adobe. It was built in 1818, and it´s the oldest house in LA:



Wikipedia: Los Angeles
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Old June 17th, 2013, 12:59 AM   #112
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The United States of America (USA).

Tubac (Arizona).

It´s the oldest Spanish settlement in Arizona (from 1752), nowadays is just a small village (1,000 inhab., approx.).

Back then, Arizona didn´t exist as a political entity yet, so then it was a part of the province of Sonora and Sinaloa (which mostly remained Mexican after 1848).

I don´t know about the existence of any old Spanish building left, any data is welcome.

The village seems to have a thing for pottery these days:



Wikipedia: Gary Dee



Wikipedia: George Needham



Wikipedia: FRED
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Old June 17th, 2013, 01:45 AM   #113
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The United States of America (USA).

San José (California).

It´s the third city in California, and also the old capital of both the Spanish Alta California province and the US state of California, before it lost it to Sacramento.

No matter, San José is one of the richest cities in the US, thanks to its vicinity to Silicon Valley.

And though most people think it´s San Francisco, San José is actually the biggest city in Northern California:



Wikipedia: Michael



The cathedral, first built in 1803, but reconstructed many times due to the earthquakes.
Sadly, San José hasn´t kept many old buildings because of that:



Wikipedia: Daderot



The Peralta house, built in adobe, is the oldest house in the city, and the only remaining Spanish house to have survived the earthquakes.
It was built in 1797:



Wikipedia: Daderot
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Old June 17th, 2013, 02:17 AM   #114
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The United States of America (USA).

Carmel-by-the-Sea (California). (Spanish name: Carmelo)

Carmel is a town renowned for being the home to Jack London, James Ellroy, R.L. Stevenson, Clint Eastwood, and many others.

It has nice beaches too:



Wikipedia: Meij.kobayashi



The main site, though, is the Mission of San Carlos Borromeo, founded in 1770 by father Junípero Serra.
It was the 'headquarters' of the Catholic church in the Spanish California:



Wikipedia: Sam67fr



Wikipedia: Sam67fr



Wikipedia: Saraherickson333



Wikipedia: Nheyob
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Old December 10th, 2013, 02:57 PM   #115
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Old December 11th, 2013, 12:03 AM   #116
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The United States of America (USA).

San Antonio (Texas). (Spanish name: San Antonio de Béjar, or San Antonio de Béxar in old Spanish)


Well, this one was unmissable, wasn´t it?
It is one of the crucial historical places to understand what the current USA (and Texas in particular) are like.

Population 1.3 million (2 million the urban area). Better known by its famous basketball team, the San Antonio Spurs.
But not so much for its history, outside the USA...

It all started in the early 18th century, when a mission convent, a presidio (a fort), and an irrigation canal were built, following the orders of the Spanish authorities.

The mission convent, known as San Antonio de Valero, was by the 19th century commonly known as El Álamo ("the poplar"), possibly because of some nearby tree.
It was the site of a battle between Mexicans and Texans/US Americans, in 1836.
Many people know (or do they?) that the Mexicans actually won that battle (but not the war, and with it, they lost not just Texas, but quite a bit more), but some people in the USA should remember that it was NOT the Spaniards who lost it, since we had already lost it in 1821 , when Mexico became independent from Spain (and thus Texas with it)...

The original convent of El Álamo was turned into a fort by the Texans/US Americans, but the original Spanish structures remain, and it still stands, and it is the most touristic site in Texas:


Photo by Daniel Schwen @ Wikipedia


Photo by TheConduqtor @ Wikipedia



This is the downtown of San Antonio. That´s the old town, where another of the historical Spanish buildings is located, the Presidio:


Photo by Kkinder @ Wikipedia



The Presidio (actually a fort, built in 1716), was the seed that made develop a small town. Families from Galicia, the Canary Islands and Cuba settled there.
It still exists, and you can visit it:


Photo by DLS Texas @ Wikipedia



The Bexar County House, vaguely reminiscent of Spanish architecture:
(btw, Spanish speakers will read "Béjar" and not "Béksar", since the original name Béjar is that of a town near Salamanca, Spain, but written in ye olde Spanish ortography)


Photo by Mr.Z-man @ Wikipedia



Mission San Antonio de la Espada, built in 1731 when it relocated from another area in Texas. I find it absolutely lovely:


Photo by Liveon001 (Travis K. Witt) @ Wikipedia


Photo by Mike Fisher @ Wikipedia


Photo by Liveon001 (Travis K. Witt) @ Wikipedia



Not far there´s the Espada Acequia (irrigation canal), which has an aqueduct built over the Piedras Creek in 1731, like the mission. It must be one of the oldest irrigation canals in the USA, if not the oldest...


Photo by Liveon001 (Travis K. Witt) @ Wikipedia



Mission San Juan Capistrano (not to be mistaken with the other mission of the same name in California).
Built in 1731 too:


Photo by Liveon001 (Travis K. Witt) @ Wikipedia



Mission Concepción. Built in 1731, rather interesting too:


Photo by Liveon001 (Travis K. Witt) @ Wikipedia


Photo by Liveon001 (Travis K. Witt) @ Wikipedia

(to be continued...)
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Old June 2nd, 2014, 03:21 PM   #117
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cebu philippines
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Old June 12th, 2015, 02:09 PM   #118
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TO Begin with most FILIPINOS
don't know how to speak spanish during the colonial periods

because the spanish did not even want to teach spanish
to the FILIPINO COMMONERS because the friars were afraid
that the FILIPINOS might start to question them.
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