daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Forums > Architecture > Urban Renewal and Redevelopment

Urban Renewal and Redevelopment Bringing new life into old buildings and neighbourhoods



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


View Poll Results: How many years?
less than 100 15 2.96%
100-200 49 9.68%
200-300 33 6.52%
300-400 36 7.11%
400-500 52 10.28%
500-600 19 3.75%
600-700 19 3.75%
700-800 39 7.71%
800-900 25 4.94%
900-1,000 31 6.13%
1,000-1,500 52 10.28%
1,500-2,000 20 3.95%
more than 2,000 116 22.92%
Voters: 506. You may not vote on this poll

Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old December 30th, 2012, 12:54 AM   #41
Jonesy55
Mooderator
 
Jonesy55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Floreat Salopia
Posts: 14,199
Likes (Received): 20053

Quote:
Originally Posted by poshbakerloo View Post
But there isn't actually anything there which looks or is remotely Roman. Manchester is basically a Victorian city.
Apart from the small roman wall in castlefields..

The oldest major buildings in the city centre are the cathedral and Chethams School of Music which were built in the 15th century, then there are a handful of tudor buildings, St Anns church frim the early 18th century and of course the many mill buildings in Ancoats etc that date to the late 18th century.

But yes, 19th century Victorian architecture is the forte of the city and there are some great examples there.
Jonesy55 no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old December 30th, 2012, 01:38 AM   #42
De Klauw
Registered User
 
De Klauw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 11,029
Likes (Received): 2409

Quote:
Originally Posted by musiccity View Post
Interesting, American cities seem so recent compared to everyone else. Lots of history
You seem suprised?


anyway. I think we can amuse:

European cities: very old (the more north, the less old)
Asian cities: very old (except Russian cities in Siberia).
Northern African cities: very old
South American cities: not so old, but a history of 500 year is not uncommon (from the 1500's onwards). Older than Northern American cities.
North America: new
Oceanic cities (Australia/ New Zealand): very new
Sub-Saharan African cities: even newer

Of course this is an oversimplification and multiple exceptions exist.

Although most Asians cities have a long history. Quite few of that is still visible today. In any case less than in European cities. Although it's equally true that most buildings in European cities are not older than 500 year.

Last edited by De Klauw; December 30th, 2012 at 01:49 AM.
De Klauw no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 30th, 2012, 05:08 AM   #43
miltao
Registered User
 
miltao's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 221
Likes (Received): 138

138 years old
miltao no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 30th, 2012, 05:38 AM   #44
CarltonHill
Kim Domingo
 
CarltonHill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: MNL
Posts: 1,484
Likes (Received): 1576

500 years old.
CarltonHill no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 30th, 2012, 06:00 AM   #45
gabrielbabb
Registered User
 
gabrielbabb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Mexico City CDMX
Posts: 2,571
Likes (Received): 1854

Mexico City is 687 years old, founded in 1325 by the aztec empire, with the name of Tenochtitlan

gabrielbabb no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 30th, 2012, 10:46 AM   #46
Slartibartfas
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Vedunia
Posts: 11,544
Likes (Received): 5838

Quote:
Originally Posted by De Klauw View Post
...

Although most Asians cities have a long history. Quite few of that is still visible today. In any case less than in European cities. Although it's equally true that most buildings in European cities are not older than 500 year.
Good summary, but I disagree on the last point. Especially in Italy, but also in France for example, many towns are widely influenced by medieval architecture which has its origin by definition beyond 500 years ago. Of course, most cities nowadays feature much more of much more recent structures, but that same argument applies for baroque structures for example.
__________________
"Brexit means Brexit and we are going to make a Titanic success of it.”
Boris Johnson, Foreign Secretary, UK
Slartibartfas no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 30th, 2012, 11:55 AM   #47
MasonicStage™
Super Moderator
 
MasonicStage™'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Zagreb
Posts: 18,950

Zagreb

Urban life in Zagreb area seems to have started near 2000 years ago in the ancient Roman town called Andautonia (now Ščitarjevo).

The name 'Zagreb' first appeared in 1094.

It gained a 'free royal city' status in 1242.

Unified in 1850. (Kaptol, clergy inhabited part of the city and Gradec, inhabited by merchants)


__________________
Written by nature edited by evolution.
MasonicStage™ no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 30th, 2012, 12:13 PM   #48
Fab87
Dietrich von Welschbern
 
Fab87's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Welschbern
Posts: 7,390
Likes (Received): 7152

Verona, Italy, officially became a roman colonia in 89BC, and a roman city in 49BC. The name and the city, though, are older. A pre-roman settlement named "Verona" pre-existed the roman military castrum. Verona has a strategic position in northern Italy and preistorical settlements were found on the hills surrounding the city.

Roman verona (on the flatlands, protected by the river):


Pre-roman settlement (on the hill):


Current historical center:
__________________
"A Torino sso' cchiu mariuol e cca"
senza generalizzare, ovviamente ;)
Fab87 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 30th, 2012, 02:00 PM   #49
Slartibartfas
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Vedunia
Posts: 11,544
Likes (Received): 5838

How Vindobona probably looked like:



An overlay of the Roman fort and today's old town:
http://www.wien.gv.at/archaeologie/i...nslager-gr.gif

Especially the fort walls are followed major roads within the 1st district. One of them, "am Graben" is even named after the pit.


Late medieval Vienna (1470), one of the first authentic visual records


The city before the Siege of Vienna (1592)



... and before the Battle of Vienna (1683)

__________________
"Brexit means Brexit and we are going to make a Titanic success of it.”
Boris Johnson, Foreign Secretary, UK

RémonM liked this post

Last edited by Slartibartfas; December 30th, 2012 at 02:16 PM.
Slartibartfas no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 30th, 2012, 02:47 PM   #50
MasonicStage™
Super Moderator
 
MasonicStage™'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Zagreb
Posts: 18,950

wow, I had no idea Vienna had star-shaped medieval walls that surrounded the city.
Are there any left today?
__________________
Written by nature edited by evolution.
MasonicStage™ no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 30th, 2012, 04:30 PM   #51
musiccity
Retired Mod
 
musiccity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Phoenix, Arizona
Posts: 18,088
Likes (Received): 15099

I'm guessing the Battle of Vienna destroyed those walls
__________________
“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”

-Mark Twain
musiccity no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 30th, 2012, 05:52 PM   #52
Slartibartfas
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Vedunia
Posts: 11,544
Likes (Received): 5838

It did not only have a full scale star shaped fortification system but that system was also tested really hard during the battle of Vienna. Vienna was heavily besieged by the Turks for a whole 2 months. During that time, the Osman army tried to overcome the bastions by mining below them and blowing them up from below with lots of explosives. One bastion was almost leveled that way but the defense could be upheld. But time was running out when finally the relief army under the command of the Polish king arrived. The rest is history

Actually the city fortification was intact as long as into the middle 19th century. The area around it was used as park and beyond a certain line, the suburbs started. As long as the walls existed only what was inside was considered to be Vienna, in fact, merely today's first district.

The entire wall system was torn down, also due to public pressure and the imperial Ringstraße took its place. It was among the largest city renewal programs of its time.

A city plan of 1858:



Photo (!) of Schottentor and Kärntnertor (1858)



PS: If the walls were still there, Vienna would look so incredibly romantic but most of the imperial stuff it is famous for would not exist.
__________________
"Brexit means Brexit and we are going to make a Titanic success of it.”
Boris Johnson, Foreign Secretary, UK

Last edited by Slartibartfas; December 30th, 2012 at 06:21 PM.
Slartibartfas no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 30th, 2012, 06:39 PM   #53
Slartibartfas
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Vedunia
Posts: 11,544
Likes (Received): 5838

Remains of the Viennese fortification system are rare and you have to know where to look. Many visitors will be totally unaware of it, even after visiting the city.

Only a part of one bastion and one gate are still standing:

the Burgtor (in an adapted form without any walls left or right)



the Mölkerbastei



At the U3 station Stubentor, named after one of the destroyed gates, they uncovered and integrated a part of the wall into the station and one of its exits.

__________________
"Brexit means Brexit and we are going to make a Titanic success of it.”
Boris Johnson, Foreign Secretary, UK

Last edited by Slartibartfas; December 30th, 2012 at 06:45 PM.
Slartibartfas no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 30th, 2012, 07:49 PM   #54
poshbakerloo
***Alexxx***
 
poshbakerloo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: London, Manchester, Cheshire, Sheffield, Moscow
Posts: 5,084
Likes (Received): 283

Quote:
Originally Posted by DanielFigFoz View Post
Apparently London as we know it was founded in 43 AD.

Although there were settlements here before.
Most cities have old roots but not many actually look or work anything like how they used to.
__________________
"BEFORE WE MARRY...I HAVE A SECRET!"

I <3 London
poshbakerloo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 30th, 2012, 08:18 PM   #55
Slartibartfas
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Vedunia
Posts: 11,544
Likes (Received): 5838

But where to draw the line? I'd say, no or at least hardly any city anywhere works like even 200 years ago and barely any city has a lot from more than 1000 years ago still standing.
__________________
"Brexit means Brexit and we are going to make a Titanic success of it.”
Boris Johnson, Foreign Secretary, UK
Slartibartfas no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 30th, 2012, 10:35 PM   #56
Kozhedub
Global conspirator
 
Kozhedub's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Mitteleuropa
Posts: 6,842

Donetsk, Ukraine was founded in 1869 by a Welsh businessman called John Hughes, but there were settlements here starting from 17th century.

A market street in 1887:



Downtown in 1912

__________________
We all are born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid.
Benjamin Franklin
Kozhedub no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 30th, 2012, 11:37 PM   #57
Beware
Registered User
 
Beware's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 503
Likes (Received): 13

Some Peoria, IL (USA) Historical info....



Peoria is one of the oldest settlements in Illinois, as explorers first ventured up the Illinois River from the Mississippi. The lands that eventually would become Peoria were first settled in 1680, when French explorers René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle and Henri de Tonti constructed Fort Crevecoeur. This fort would later burn to the ground, and in 1813 Fort Clark, Illinois was built. When the County of Peoria was organized in 1825, Fort Clark was officially named Peoria.[citation needed]

Peoria comes from the Native word "pim-e-ti-we", meaning "fat lake".[4]

Peoria was incorporated as a village on March 11, 1835. The city did not have a mayor, though they had a village president, Rudolphus Rouse, who served from 1835 to 1836. The first Chief of Police, John B Lishk, was appointed in 1837. The city was incorporated on April 21, 1845. This was the end of a village president and the start of the mayoral system, with the first mayor being William Hale.

Peoria, Arizona, a suburb of Phoenix, was named after Peoria, Illinois because the two men that founded it in 1890 — Joseph B. Greenhut and Deloss S. Brown — wished to name it after their hometown.[5]

The first American automobile, the Duryea, was reportedly produced in downtown Peoria.[citation needed]

In 1926, Charles Lindbergh flew mail into Peoria as a stop on his mail route between St. Louis and Chicago. Charles Lindbergh also asked Peoria to support his flight, but they denied him. He later was funded by St. Louis.
- from (source) Wikepedia.
Beware no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2012, 01:25 AM   #58
elviszea.m
fröhliche
 
elviszea.m's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Nueva Barcelona-Valencia
Posts: 1,475
Likes (Received): 242

Nueva Valencia del Rey was founded in 1555 by Captain Alonso Díaz Moreno and it was the first Spanish settlement in central Venezuela.

elviszea.m no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2012, 02:21 AM   #59
Triple C
Registered User
 
Triple C's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Antalya
Posts: 5,263
Likes (Received): 1718

Antalya: Until the discovery of 3rd Century BC remnants in 2008, it was known as founded by Pergamon King Attalos II in mid 2nd Century BC.
Ankara: It was found at Roman Era either, but began its boom after becoming the Capital of Turkey in 1923.
__________________
ek$i | Flickr | last.fm | Twitter
Concerts | Cappadocia | Eskişehir | İzmir '09 | İstanbul
In some time: Ankara, Antalya, Bandırma, Çanakkale
Triple C no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 1st, 2013, 03:51 PM   #60
Fab87
Dietrich von Welschbern
 
Fab87's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Welschbern
Posts: 7,390
Likes (Received): 7152

Quote:
Originally Posted by Slartibartfas View Post
I

. The area around it was used as park and beyond a certain line, the suburbs started.


Looks familiar. In my hometown Verona the austrians forbid the construction of any building within 1mile from the city walls. As a result, the areas and buildings immediately outside the walls are newer than some outer suburbs.
__________________
"A Torino sso' cchiu mariuol e cca"
senza generalizzare, ovviamente ;)
Fab87 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 09:03 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu