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Old January 10th, 2013, 02:27 PM   #1
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Green Manchester

Can't find a topic on this, so start a new thread on all environmentally friendly subjects.

03/12/12 298/2012

Issued on behalf of the Association of Greater Manchester Authorities (AGMA) and strictly embargoed until 7am Monday 3rd December 2012
I
Media opportunity:

3/12/12 - Signing of agreement between AGMA and NEDO - 9.45 am, Manchester Town Hall

Multi-million ‘green deal’ is a world first for Greater Manchester

Hundreds of households in Greater Manchester could benefit from more affordable energy bills thanks to a multi-million pound deal to be signed today (Monday 3rd December).
The deal, which could see up to £20 million invested in the local economy, is between Japan’s Department of New Energy and Development Organisation (NEDO) and the Association of Greater Manchester Authorities (AGMA). The UK Government has also backed the initiative.
State-of-the-art technology will be fitted in homes across Greater Manchester - starting with around 300 social housing properties. If successful it could be rolled out to thousands of properties across the region. The technology generates energy using a combination of low carbon heat units and a remote ‘smart grid’ management system. This will be the first time this technology has been used domestically anywhere in the world.
It’s hoped the pilot project will help develop technology that could reduce the country’s reliance on fossil fuels. The technology will create new supplies of renewable electricity, help keep energy costs low and assist in meeting climate change targets. The technology will be up and running by 2014 – subject to detailed study.
Lord Peter Smith, Chair of AGMA and Leader of Wigan Council, says: “We have been working closely with our colleagues at NEDO, who bring a huge amount of technical knowledge and passion for green energy to this project. This agreement takes us into the next phase involving detailed work on the potential project.
“This agreement builds on the successful work we have already been doing to create a low carbon hub in Greater Manchester and is another economic energy success story for our region. I am personally delighted that NEDO has chosen Greater Manchester to develop this project.”
The deal forms part of Greater Manchester’s commitment to exploring cleaner and greener energy supplies. The region became a “UK Low Carbon Hub” in October after a deal was struck between AGMA and the Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC). The agreement recognised Greater Manchester is leading the way in delivering low carbon initiatives.
Officials from NEDO are in Greater Manchester for the next two days. They will sign the deal with AGMA later today before being taken on a tour of Manchester and Wigan.
Ashley Crumbley, chief executive of Wigan and Leigh Housing, and buildings lead for the Low Carbon Hub says: “This agreement builds on the work we have already carried out across Greater Manchester using energy saving equipment and green energy generating technology such as solar panels, which has resulted in thousands of homes now benefiting from lower bills.
“By working closely with NEDO to further develop this state of the art technology, the project could pave the way for a large scale replacement of gas boilers with a new form of heat generation.”
ends
This has been issued on behalf of AGMA. For further information contact David Henry, Communications Officer, Wigan Council, 01942 827 823.
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Old January 10th, 2013, 02:38 PM   #2
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Low Carbon Hub Agreement signed Thursday 1st November 2012

Greater Manchester became a UK Low Carbon Hub on 29th October
when Energy and Climate Change Secretary Ed Davey MP visited Greater Manchester to sign a unique agreement.
The agreement between the Greater Manchester Combined Authority and the Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC) is a recognition that GM is leading the way in delivering low carbon initiatives. It is also a commitment from the government to design and deliver new green initiatives here in Greater Manchester. This could bring funding to pioneer new low carbon approaches on behalf of DECC – reducing carbon emissions and bringing jobs and investment into Greater Manchester. Mr Davey met with the Leader of Manchester City Council and other key stakeholders at the Co-operative Group’s new 1 Angel Square development to sign the historic agreement which supports the development of Greater Manchester’s Low Carbon Hub. The Hub aims to combine the knowledge of GM’s universities with the innovation of its businesses under the governance of the Combined Authority, working in partnership to deliver a low carbon future. Finally the Secretary of State travelled on the new Metrolink line to Oldham and visited the Green Technology Centre which uses innovative methods to train the workforce delivering the Green Deal, creating opportunities for young people, SMEs and business.
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Old January 11th, 2013, 01:31 AM   #3
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yawn...
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Old January 11th, 2013, 07:11 AM   #4
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Even for those that don't appreciate the environmental angle there is a big economic story here as well.
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Old January 12th, 2013, 07:52 PM   #5
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More funding is cool
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Old January 15th, 2013, 01:48 PM   #6
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Oh leave it out. Green Manchester? The only thing that's low-carbon about MCC is their fondness for cutting down trees. And they can't be arsed to look after gardens in the city centre, so they pave open space. This so reminds me of people who trumpet their green credentials then destroy their front garden and cover it in gravel because they just can't be bothered to do any gardening, and they can't be bothered to move one car to get the other one out. And since when did anything "green" do anything other than double your electric and gas bill? And serve as the straw that breaks the camel's back leaving you without a job?
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Old February 1st, 2013, 08:22 PM   #7
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Quote:
Protestors set up camp at Alexandra Park in Whalley Range on aerial platforms built on branches

1 Feb 2013 15:57

It's over trees being felled in a council regeneration project. Work began on Monday to fell trees as part of a £4.5M restoration project to improve the park by creating ornamental gardens and new sports facilities.


Alexandra Park, Whalley Range, which is set to undergo a face-lift.


Protestors have set up camp in trees at a park – in protest at them being felled in a council regeneration project.
Campaigners say they intend to stay on the aerial platforms, built on branches, until work stops at Alexandra Park in Whalley Range, Manchester – or they are evicted.
Work began on Monday to fell trees as part of a £4.5M restoration project to improve the park by creating ornamental gardens and new sports facilities.
But police had to be called in after protestors held a 'trespass' into the area where trees were being cut down.
Officers remained at the park yesterday [Friday] so council contractors could continue their work.
Members of the Save Alexandra Park Trees group started their campaign in December after being concerned around 400 trees were due to be removed.
The council says the number is closer to 260 – and that 100 new trees will be planted in their place.
Protestor Ian Brewer, 46, who lives on Range Road, Whalley Range, said: "We plan to stay in the trees until we are evicted by a court order.

Ian Brewer from Save Alexandra Park Eddie Garvey
"Bringing this project to a halt is the only way to get the council back around the negotiating table.
"Most of us are in full favour of project, except the vast extent of the tree felling.
"It's devastating the park and soul destroying to see the number of trees being removed."
The council says the regeneration work on the park is supported by a majority of residents and that protestors' claims are 'exaggerated'.
Eamonn O'Rourke, council head of communities and culture, said: "The actions of a small, noisy band of protesters are now holding up much-needed improvements to the park which have widespread public support and indeed all the evidence from our ongoing conversations with local people - which date back several years as these plans have been developed - suggest that the majority are behind the plans.
“We have taken community views on board as part of this process, and indeed reduced the number of trees removed after consultation, but now it our responsibility to deliver the plans.
"These plans are about making this historic park fit for the 21st Century so people feel safe and can get involved in a wide range of activities.
“As well as restoring some elements of the original design, this also means improving sight-lines and making sure people feel safe within the park environment.
"This group of protesters are making exaggerated claims about the number of trees being felled and failing to mention the planting of around 100 replacement trees which will also take place."
From Manchester Evening News
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Old February 3rd, 2013, 11:47 PM   #8
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Well, would it not be possible to uproot them and replant them in the city centre?

(or somewhere else, but the city centre needs more trees)
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Old February 6th, 2013, 03:54 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VDB View Post
Well, would it not be possible to uproot them and replant them in the city centre?

(or somewhere else, but the city centre needs more trees)
As a rule of thumb the important "heart root system" of a tree mirrors the canopy of the tree above ground with smaller roots extending up to three times what the spread is. As such moving 100year old trees is impossible.

I do think, in this day and age, if you take out 250 mature trees we should be planting about five times that many to compensate. As you say, even if Alexander Park cannot accommodate that number the city needs more trees- time for an Urban Forest (Pomona Docks city park, BBC Oxford Road Park?)

Quote:
Regeneration of the Park

Posted on August 12, 2012 by admin
Alexandra Park is now going into an incredible exciting period of its history due to securing funding from the Heritage Lottery Fund. A part of the Council’s HLF proposal shows a strong focus on community engagement and the Friends see this as an excellent opportunity to welcoming in more people to join us. As we aim to become the central hub for existing Park activity and the future HLF funded community engagement program.
Chorlton Lodge entrance (artist's impression)

The £2.2 million from the HLF will be matched by funding from the Council creating a project that will bring major physical improvements to the Park alongside a programme of community activities.
Terrace (artist's impression)

The coming months will see preparation for the Capital Works which should begin around December 2012 and last around 15 months.
Applications have also been made to Sport England and other sports bodies which focus on transforming the sports facilities in the Park.
To find out more about the regeneration program and how to get involved, visit the Council website.
I raised an eyebrow at the design for Victorian-style flowerbeds in Manchester as we all know the MCC general regard for such things.

It does appear that as part of the funding there will be a full time head gardener and apprentices for 10yrs on this project and the Friends of Alexander Park are fully content with the consultation and design of the area.

Tree felling recommenced on Monday anyway.
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Old February 8th, 2013, 03:44 PM   #10
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Quote:
City centre to get its first children’s play area

8 Feb 2013, 13:05

David McCourt



Work on the sixth Manchester Garden City scheme at Victoria Street, next to Manchester Cathedral, will start next week.

The design includes the city centre's first children's play area, complete with a sandpit and wooden play apparatus including balancing beams, ropes and stepping posts.

The site incorporates a temporary Cathedral building, which will be in place for 18 months. The 22m long wooden structure will host services and events whilst the floor of the main Cathedral is re-laid for a new heating system.

New trees, ornamental flowers, shrub beds and allotment-style grow-boxes for local residents to plant their own herbs and vegetables, will be introduced as part of the project.

Artificially grassed areas, seating and chalets to cater for community events and children's activities aim to create a pleasant place for people to take time out from the city centre.

The scheme will see the introduction of a new cycle lane, connecting Victoria Street to Greengate.

Most of the materials used in the development have been recycled from Chris Beardshaw's groundwork garden show at RHS Hampton Court. Wooden decking and chalets from last summer's canal festival in Piccadilly Basin are being used, as well as picnic benches donated by KRObar.

This Manchester Garden City scheme, led by city centre management company CityCo, design agency BDP and Groundwork, is jointly funded by CityCo, Manchester City Council and Manchester Cathedral.

Cllr Pat Karney, Manchester City Council's city centre spokesperson, said: "Manchester is full of underused pockets of space, many of which have already been innovatively transformed for the public to enjoy. This play area is another example of how we can be creative with our public spaces and bring life to a quiet corner of the city centre."

Gary Ellis, operations director CityCo, said: "The garden will be a family-friendly space in a relatively quiet location, yet close to shops, attractions, bars and restaurants."

Reverend Rogers Govender, dean of Manchester, said: "I am pleased with the way Manchester Cathedral is playing an active role in changing for the better the green spaces that we are able to develop to support the life of this great city."

BDP's Manchester studio was responsible for the initial design concepts.

Darrell Wilson, landscape architect at BDP, said: "We are excited to see the plans for the scheme finally realised, turning what was a large sterile tarmac road, closed to traffic, into a fantastic community resource.

"We wanted to create something different in the city centre that would be both exciting and fun for people, but also something that would be environmentally beneficial for the area."

Victoria Street is the sixth Manchester Garden City scheme. Others include canal-side planting in Piccadilly Basin, grow-boxes on Dale Street car park, the orchard in St John's Gardens, a Northern Quarter pocket park on Thomas Street and the revamped Albert Bridge Gardens.

A community event is being planned by CityCo with local gardening groups and businesses to tend to all the sites, and plant new flowers and shrubs for spring and summer. Anyone wanting to volunteer to help can email gardencity@cityco.com.
http://www.placenorthwest.co.uk/news...play-area.html
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Old February 8th, 2013, 05:24 PM   #11
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Looks promising flange

Although initial concerns are (imo) the busy main road and traffic. Given that its a playground I can see health and safety written all over it.

However it is a great idea

Andrew
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Old February 9th, 2013, 09:00 PM   #12
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Flange nice find, that looks like a nice idea
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Old February 9th, 2013, 11:05 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LongRipple View Post
As a rule of thumb the important "heart root system" of a tree mirrors the canopy of the tree above ground with smaller roots extending up to three times what the spread is. As such moving 100year old trees is impossible.

I do think, in this day and age, if you take out 250 mature trees we should be planting about five times that many to compensate. As you say, even if Alexander Park cannot accommodate that number the city needs more trees- time for an Urban Forest (Pomona Docks city park, BBC Oxford Road Park?)

I raised an eyebrow at the design for Victorian-style flowerbeds in Manchester as we all know the MCC general regard for such things.
Not sure if anyone's ever been into Bury Borough, but Bury MBC are very good with their flowers, trees, plants and "green representation". They're lovely flower pots everywhere, including a section of road in Whitefield where they're about 10 trees a similar distance apart all cut in the same shape - looks very neat.

I think MCC could do with learning off/hiring a few of Bury's "plant people"
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Old May 20th, 2013, 04:24 PM   #14
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Minister discusses GM Green Deal
Friday 10th May 2013

MINISTER FOR CLIMATE CHANGE DISCUSSES THE GREEN DEAL

Greg Barker, Minister for Climate Change made a visit to Manchester yesterday (Thursday, May 9) to discuss Greater Manchester’s progress in pioneering the Green Deal. The Minister met with housing, skills, building and energy experts from Greater Manchester’s Low Carbon Hub – made up of representatives from the ten local authorities and private sector businesses, whose aim is to reduce carbon emissions across the region by 48 per cent by 2020. The Green Deal enables households to make energy saving improvements such as insulation, draught proofing and double glazing as well as funding new sustainable technologies such as solar panels or wind turbines. Improvements are paid for in instalments added to the household’s electricity bill. As one of the ‘Go Early’ pilot areas for the Green Deal GM has already launched its local programme- carrying out 584 Green Deal assessments and agreeing 555 improvement plans and loans to households. In total this has delivered around £7.5 million of investment in energy saving and green technologies. The Green Deal offer builds on the success of the Greater Manchester Get Me Toasty campaign which, by the end of last year, had delivered over £5 million of energy improvements to homes across the area with a total carbon saving of nearly 13,000 tonnes. Alongside the Greater Manchester Energy Switch - the UK's largest local government led scheme, these initiatives aim to improve household finances and cut carbon emissions by changing how we buy and use energy in our homes. The meeting took place at the Greenbuild expo - a major exhibition of low carbon and environmental products and services, which featured many successful Greater Manchester companies. The sector employs over 37,000 people and generates £5.4 Billion a year in Greater Manchester alone, and is one of the fastest growing sectors in the UK. Ways to provide jobs and skills in this sector, to protect customers from energy price rises through energy system innovation and to improve access to finance for small companies seeking to grow as part of a low carbon economy were key topics of discussion with the Minister. Mr Barker said: “I’m delighted residents across Greater Manchester are taking advantage of the benefits offered by the Green Deal. “The scheme is helping to transform the health and lives of thousands of people by giving them easy access to improvements that are not only helping the environment but also adding value to their homes and saving them money on their energy bills.” ENDS
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Old May 21st, 2013, 02:10 PM   #15
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A New Leaf Manchester

A Resident-led Group, Aiming to Improve, Promote and Expand Greenery and Green Space in Manchester City Centre

http://anewleafmcr.wordpress.com/
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Old May 21st, 2013, 09:59 PM   #16
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Well that was quick

Quote:
We did it!! Well done everyone!! Funding target reached for Stevenson Square green makeover http://ow.ly/lezJu #greensteven
https://twitter.com/ANewLeafMCR?refsrc=email


The average person donated nearly £480!
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Old July 2nd, 2013, 09:06 AM   #17
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Region's £5.4bn green economy set for growth

By Adam Jupp |

2 Jul 2013 05:54

That is the conclusion of a report released today by Manchester think tank New Economy. The organisation's latest Manchester Monitor says the low carbon and environmental goods sector is set to grow at four per cent year-on-year. It says it is the third biggest of its kind in the UK, behind London and the south east. The Monitor says 37,000 people are employed by 2,000 businesses in the sector and that it grew by four per cent in 2011/12, outperforming the UK economy as a whole. It says opportunities in the years to come will be for engineering firms to diversify into renewable energy, particularly the wind, biomass and geothermal sub-sectors. Baron Frankal, director of economic strategy at New Economy, said: “The low carbon sector is touted by all cities as a strong arrow in their quiver. “Data within this month’s Manchester Monitor does seem to show that it is something of a strength in our region. “The sector’s growth rate in Greater Manchester has outperformed the UK economy throughout the recent recession and is forecast to continue to grow by more than 4% per year over the next few years. “This news is a particular boost for our manufacturing and engineering businesses and suggests that there is real scope for businesses to diversify into low carbon and environmental goods services. “Across the board, trends suggest that we may have a glimpse of some sort of economic recovery. “However, we’re certainly not out of the woods yet and many factors have still to come fully into force. “Not least are the implications of last week’s spending review, which will test all energies to drive Greater Manchester’s economy in the right direction over the next decade.”
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Old September 20th, 2013, 10:19 AM   #18
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Not in Manchester, but it is Manchester's all the same

From the BBC

'Ambitious' plan for High Peak Moors

By Mark Kinver

Environment reporter, BBC News

A 50-year conservation project, described as the "biggest and most ambitious" of its kind, aims to restore a historic part of the Peak District.

The National Trust has launched its vision to undo decades of damage on High Peak Moors and return the landscape back to its former glory.

Measures include drainage removal and vegetation and woodland restoration.

The area includes Kinder Scout, the site of the 1932 mass trespass that led to the formation of National Parks.


More than 10 million people are estimated to visit the area each year
The Trust's rural enterprises director, Patrick Begg, said restoring the vital habitat could only be tackled over the long term.

"There really is not much point committing to restore upland peat bogs over a five-year period as this just scratches the surface," he explained.

"In order to get them back into good health, we really need to be committing to [50 years]. The work we will do will take that long to bed in and for the habitat to start to turn round."

Mr Begg told BBC News that the project will focus on a number of areas.

"We will be really investing in rewetting the bogs on the tops," he said.

"That involves blocking up drainage gullies and reseeding and replanting the bogs with cotton grass, as well as laying cut heather on them.

"My nutshell phrase at the moment is turning what looks like a moonscape at the moment, because it is so eroded, back into a moor-scape. It will look very different when we are done.

"Through that vegetation work, it will also be a better home for a wide range of species, so there will be better biodiversity."

Woodland revival

Another aspect of the vision will be to develop more woodlands in the area's cloughs, which are the steep valleys that lead up to the moors, to replace the loss of tree cover in recent decades.

"If you went back in time 50 years or more, you would have seen a rich tapestry of woodlands on those valleys," Mr Begg observed.

"We want to put those back and they will help in providing homes for wildlife as well as stabilising the soil and vegetation so we don't get the kind of run-off that we see at the moment."

The Trust says its vision will be beneficial in a number of other ways, namely helping to protect water supplies into the future and storing carbon dioxide that would otherwise end up in the atmosphere.

Authors of the 50-year plan says water from the moors feed two reservoirs in the area and the Trust-owned part of the moors stores carbon that is equivalent to three years' worth of emissions from a city the size of Sheffield.

Mr Begg added: "These are fundamental things that society needs us to be doing, alongside providing a better future for nature. It is also about being able to connect people back to nature."

The area contains the site of a protest that has been acknowledged as being pivotal in opening up public access to many of the nation's natural landscapes.

In April 1932, hundreds of ramblers walked on to private land on Kinder Scout, Derbyshire, to assert their right to walk freely across the countryside, which they called their "right to roam".

A number of the walkers were arrested and imprisoned but the act highlighted the growing demand among people to be granted access to natural areas for leisure and recreation.

Mr Begg observed: "We are very aware of that cultural depth and we want to continue to inspire people through the direct contact with nature."
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Old September 21st, 2013, 01:23 AM   #19
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Well that was quick



https://twitter.com/ANewLeafMCR?refsrc=email


The average person donated nearly £480!
Awesome!
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Old October 18th, 2013, 02:45 PM   #20
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From The Businessdesk

Manchester's geothermal plant set for approval
18th October 2013

A DUBLIN company is expected to get the go-ahead next week to start work in Manchester on what could become the UK's first large-scale geothermal plant.

It wants to harness heat from hot water 3,200 metres below Ardwick and plans to start by drilling two exploratory boreholes that would subsequently be used as operational wells.

GT Energy believes its multi-million pound project could be the focus of a low-carbon economic zone in the area, as well as help to drive down energy costs for local people.

It has partnered with the German energy company E.ON to tap a natural energy reservoir beneath the city known as the Cheshire Basin from a council-owned plot of land on the corner of Devonshire Street and Coverdale Crescent, close to the O2 Apollo venue.

The project will take up around an acre of land in the area during development. Once complete, the plant will sit on half an acre of land. It will take around a year to build and a pair of 40m-high drilling rigs will be in place for around six months.

A planning application, recommended for approval at a meeting on Thursday, details two 75cm vertical bore holes to 500 metres. Deeper drilling would require additional permissions. One hole would be used to extract the water which would pass through a heat exchanger, based in an underground energy centre, to extract the heat. The water would be pumped back through the second hole.

GT Energy said the plants are commonplace in Europe, with 34 in Paris alone. There is only one existing plant in the UK, however, which is in Southampton and is much smaller in scale. It was built in 1981.

In its publicity material about the project GT said: "The project will be one of the first of its type in the UK and will put Manchester at the forefront of low carbon community heating schemes."

Cheshire East Council is pushing ahead with a similar scheme and wants to use a 2.5-acre site close to Bentley's factory at Leighton West to investigate the potential of tapping into a geothermal energy source which it says could heat every house in the authority's area.
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