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Old January 21st, 2013, 12:22 AM   #21
Ecological
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If you put it into figures.

60% of ALL BUILDINGS in London were destroyed or damaged.

2,000,000 homes in London were DESTROYED

Another 1,500,000 damaged
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Old January 21st, 2013, 12:44 AM   #22
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Caen France

Virtually everything downtown except for the cathedrals were obliterated.

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Old January 21st, 2013, 12:51 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Viriatuus View Post
Budapest; Vienna; Antwerp, Arnhem, Nijmegen; Caen, Rouen, Le Havre... should have been included in the list.
I don't think Rouen was damaged too badly.
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Old January 21st, 2013, 01:12 AM   #24
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we are going to have a big rehashing of info here from other threads. we need to rate cities by degree of destruction based on post war surveys and to the extent possible indicate how much can be considered to have been rebuilt. sources should be provided for those who would like to do further research. To the list of destroyed in Poland that meet the population cutoff, I would add Poznan.
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Warsaw Post-War Reconstruction to Present

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Old January 21st, 2013, 01:26 PM   #25
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Rotterdam, Netherlands (Around 2.6 square kilometres (1.0 sq mi) of the historic core was levelled during the Rotterdam Blitz (1940))
Pre-war population: 560 000 - 570 000



Rotterdam is the second-largest city in the Netherlands and one of the largest ports in the world. Starting as a dam constructed in 1270 on the Rotte River, Rotterdam has grown into a major international commercial centre. Its strategic location at the Rhine-Meuse-Scheldt delta on the North Sea and at the heart of a massive rail, road, air and inland waterway distribution system extending throughout Europe is the reason that Rotterdam is often called the "Gateway to Europe".

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Old January 21st, 2013, 01:43 PM   #26
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Frankfurt am Main, Germany (80 % of the central areas and Old town turned into rubble)
Pre-war population: 553 464



First mentioned in 794, an original stone age settlement near present-day Frankfurt’s cathedral had developed by Roman times into a garrison town, and Frankfurt later became a place of importance in the Holy Roman Empire.
As its market flourished, so did its significance as a trade city; by the 12th century the ‘Frankfurt Fair’ attracted business from the Mediterranean to the Baltic.
With Frederick I (Barbarossa) in 1152, Frankfurt became the site of the election and coronation of all German kings. The last German emperor was elected in 1792, and by the time the Holy Roman Empire collapsed in 1806 the region was under French control.
It was in Frankfurt in 1848 that Germany’s first-ever parliamentary delegation met at the Paulskirche. Although this parliament was disbanded by the Prussians, Frankfurt was hailed, much later, by US President John F Kennedy as the ‘cradle of democracy in Germany’.









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Old January 21st, 2013, 02:30 PM   #27
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Berlin - The capital of Germany (Almost entire city centre destroyed due to ally bombings (1940-1945) and the Battle of Berlin (1945))
Pre-war population: 4 338 756



In 1701, after elector Friedrich III had coronated himself as king Friedrich I in Prussia, Berlin rose to a Royal Capital and Residence Town. Numerous well-known buildings were designed then, his grandson Friedrich II (1740–1786) continued with the architectural redesign of the city, assisted by the famous architect Knobelsdorff. 1806–08 Napoleon's troups occupied the city; after the victory of Leipzig the Quadriga, which was annexed by Napoleon, was returned to the Brandenburg Gate in 1814.

In the following decades, the splendid classicist buildings by Schinkel and the blossoming park areas by Lenné emerged. Since the middle of the century, Berlin's economy boomed, the population grew rapidly. After 1871, when the city had become capital of the 'Deutsches Reich', the construction and economy boom even grew in the Gründerzeit ("founding era"), Berlin's population exceeded one million. The heavy defeat of World War I as well as revolutionary riots caused a deep crisis of the Reich and its capital. Out of the riots the Republic was proclaimed in 1918. Despite the difficult economical situation and further riots, art and culture flourished during the twenties; innovative theatre productions, splendid film premieres, vivid vaudevilles and an uncomparable nightlife made Berlin the centre of the "Golden Twenties". Hitler's takeover in 1933 marked the beginning of the persecution of Jews, Communists, Homosexuals, Oppositionals and many more.

Pre-war Berlin was Europe´s third largest city and a cosmopolitan metropole with a unique cultural and political climate.

Greatest pre-war cites and places in Berlin: Brandenburger Gate, Berliner Dom, Reichstag, Stadtschloss (Berlin royal castle), Siegessaule, Museum Island, Potsdamer Platz, Tiergarten (Berlin Zoo), Nikolaiviertel, Altes museum, Neue Wache, Rotes Rathaus and Neue Synagogue etc...









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Old January 21st, 2013, 03:25 PM   #28
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Can anyone illustrate the damage in London with pre- and post-war pictures?
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Old January 21st, 2013, 03:37 PM   #29
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Manila, the pearl of the orient. A unique blend of Spanish colonial and later American architecture.

Before:



After:

On the top left once stood Santo Tomas the oldest university of Asia.

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The Shambles that was Manila, Sampaloc, University of Santo Tomas distance upper left. The structure in the distance upper right is the Ocampo Pagoda. 1945 by John T Pilot, on Flickr
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Old January 21st, 2013, 08:15 PM   #30
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Königsberg - Former capital of Prussia (Almost entire city destroyed)
Pre-war population: 372 164



Königsberg was the capital of Prussia from the Late Middle Ages until 1701 when the capital was moved to Berlin. During the period from 1701 until 1945 it was the regional capital of the Prussian (and from 1871, German) province of East Prussia. It was the easternmost large German city until it was conquered by the Soviet Union near the end of World War II. In 1946 the city was renamed Kaliningrad.

As a university city, the home of the Albertina University, founded in 1544, Königsberg developed into an important German intellectual and cultural centre, being the residence of, among others, Simon Dach, Immanuel Kant, Käthe Kollwitz, E. T. A. Hoffmann, David Hilbert, Agnes Miegel and Michael Wieck.

During World War II Königsberg was heavily damaged by Allied bombing in 1944 and during the its siege in 1945. The city was captured and annexed by the Soviet Union, its German population completely expelled, and it was repopulated with Russians and other people from the Soviet Union. Briefly Russified as Kyonigsberg (Кёнигсберг), it was renamed "Kaliningrad" in 1946 in honour of the Soviet leader Mikhail Kalinin. The city is now the capital of Russia's Kaliningrad Oblast.

Greatest cites in pre-war Königsberg: Königsberger dom, Königsberg castle (Dating from the teutonic era), Kneiphof Island etc.









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Old January 21st, 2013, 08:58 PM   #31
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Welcome to Le Havre, before the war !









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Old January 21st, 2013, 11:14 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UnHavrais View Post
Welcome to Le Havre, before the war !
Beautiful images.

Unfortunatly as a frontline and coastline/port city Le Havre, endured the same fate as other important coastline/ port cities: Danzig/Gdansk, Konigsberg, Rotterdam, Stettin, Kolberg/Kolobrzeg, Manila, Kobe etc... during WWII
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Old January 21st, 2013, 11:26 PM   #33
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Very interesting thread.
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Old January 21st, 2013, 11:48 PM   #34
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Next city, the first from UK.

Coventry, United Kingdom (City centre nearly completely devestated during the Blitz)
Pre-war population: 214 000

[IMG]https://encrypted-tbn3.************/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR3UrTdoqoWf3phyFwArf2ISHCVDxqavq8gIkudOTF7kzjt9vpgrQ[/IMG]

From its humble beginnings as a settlement around a Saxon nunnery c. AD 700, Coventry grew to become one of the most important cities in England during the Middle Ages due to its booming cloth and textiles trade. The city was noted for its part in the English Civil War, and later became an important industrial city during the 19th and 20th centuries, becoming the centre of the British bicycle and later motor industry. The devastating Blitz in 1940 destroyed most of the city centre.









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Old January 22nd, 2013, 02:55 AM   #35
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In terms of UK cities, I would also add:

Liverpool
Exeter
Bristol
Portsmouth
Plymouth
Swansea

During the Baedeker Bombings which targeted the UK's most historical cities, Exeter came off the worst, thankfully the other cities didn't fair too badly in terms of loss to historical buildings.
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Old January 22nd, 2013, 05:07 PM   #36
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Largest architectural losses (cities > 150.000)

Guys,

Sure that a lot of minor cities were lost, like Le Havre, but:

  1. the list must contain cities > 150.000 (census 1940-1945)
  2. At least 1 suare mile of VALUABLE housing must have been lost (1 sqm is arguable however, many more sq miles may have been lost their outer decorations like the massive "cleansing" of the Berliner houses in the 50-ties and 60-ties, which were robbed of nearly all their decorations.
  3. These losses have not been rebuilt or in such a way that nowadays most of the quality has been restored (arguable). So Nürnberg (and smaller sister Würzburg) never has been restored to its 1940 beauty and almost all houses lost their impressive roofs, it nowadays recovered greatly from the moon like landscape in 1945. Caen nowadays is still a very nice city with lots of old houses and rebuilding has been done in a "sensitive" way, so different from German rebuilding which still nowadays demolish remaining old houses instead of reconstructing them. In Berlin the tiny VOSS-PALACE is now built in a vast sea of modernistic buildings, but still will not be rebuilt to its former glory. Those Germans have no feeling for their great past and certainly will not often look at the great pictures showed in this forum.....otherwise....????
By the way: the inner city of Rotterdam was considered inferior (quality of housing) to most other Dutch inner cities, like Haarlem, Leeuwarden, Leiden. Arnhem lost a few hundred houses, deliberately not rebuilt until now and it still hurts many of us but no 1 sq Mile was lost. Nijmegen has been rebuilt in a satisfactory way and has enough quality of its own.


Le Havre, Lorient, Cherbourg are sad losses however, but their architectural value was not great.


Then last but not least: I studied Königsberg (like same sized Kiel) over and over again but can not rank this city (except for a couple of buildings) as a great loss, compared to less sized Kassel, same sized Mannheim and larger sized Frankurt or Hannover. The outer suburbs of Hannover were rebuilt in a "sensitive" way, but no single house ever regained its decorations.....
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Old January 22nd, 2013, 05:51 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Klassiker View Post
Guys,

Sure that a lot of minor cities were lost, like Le Havre, but:
Minor city, Le Havre ?????? Are you crazy ?

There was around 160 000 peophe who lived in Le Havre before the war ! What can you say that's a minor city ? It's not a thread where we denigrate some cities there !


Quote:
Le Havre, Lorient, Cherbourg are sad losses however, but their architectural value was not great.
Le Havre was one of the famous city in France before the war ! A Queen, stars, politics, artists... stayed there regularly. It was considered as a small Paris but well...


And contrary to other cities of Europe, Le Havre was almost quasi-completely bombarded, and villages surroundings were shaved by the map !


Others pics of Le Havre :













And the destrcution :


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Old January 22nd, 2013, 07:59 PM   #38
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Le Havre

UnHavrais: excusez moi. It seems that here I misjudged the quality and the vast devastations. Bit 160.000 though is barely enough to be included in the list. I agree that cities > 150.000 have enough inhantants to ensure that major architectural areas were built before 1900 and just after that.

I know of other damage to cities in France: Sedan, Orleans, Tours, Metz, Dieppe, Lorient, Brest, Cherbourg, St Lo, Beauvais to name some.

By the way also a lot of Italian cities were bombed by the Allies. They don't appear in city loss lists like, German, Polish, French and British cities.
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Old January 23rd, 2013, 12:42 AM   #39
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Köln/Cologne (Entire city centre and old town (except cathedral) destroyed during WWII)
Pre-war population: 772 221



Cologne is one of the oldest large German cities and its name dates back to Roman times. The Romans founded the Ubii village on the Rhine in 50 AD and named it "Colonia". In the Middle Ages, Cologne was the most densely populated and one of the most prosperous towns in the German-speaking region - in particular due to the pilgrims and trade benefits that the newly introduced 'staple right' brought. The role as leading Hansa town and the early development of the trade fair business also led to further influence and prosperity.

Until the end of the Medieval Ages, Cologne was one of the most important trade centres in Europe. However, its excellent economic and political position suffered after the discovery of America, and with the introduction of new economic systems and trading channels, this continued into the 19th century.

In 1881 work began to demolish the city walls. This made it possible to extend the city for the first time since the Medieval Ages, leading to the development of the ring road and new town. With the Industrial Revolution and the incorporation of large parts of the surrounding area, Cologne became an industrial city.

During the Second World War around 90 percent of the inner city was destroyed.



[IMG]http://in0.*********************/bilder/k%25C3%25B6ln_altstadt_nord_heumarkt_1910_historisch_postkarte_bf2424613_600x450xfr.jpeg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://in1.*********************/bilder/k%C3%B6ln_altstadt_nord_das_dom_hotel_um_1900_historisch_postkarte_c5a824646_600x450xfr.jpeg[/IMG]



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Old January 23rd, 2013, 01:04 AM   #40
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Cologne seems to have been more heavily bombed than Berlin
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