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Old August 13th, 2015, 04:12 PM   #521
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I am unaware of "en masse" rebuilding of neighborhoods or larger areas up to and including entire towns/cities if the structures were destroyed during the war. Most of the rebuilding was isolated to special buildings, but the typical Wilhelmine blocks of apartments that were gone, were gone for good. Recently we have seen some notable restorations, but the current inventory of pre war structures is a fairly small percent.
Very sad. Makes me appreciate American cities with relatively intact, "average" neighborhoods built before the war.
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Old December 28th, 2015, 12:23 AM   #522
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Some old pictures of Nurnberg:

In the 18th century:



1900:


1700:


1693:



1700:



RIP to this beautiful city in WW2!
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Old December 28th, 2015, 12:27 AM   #523
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16th century, by Anton Koberger:

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Old December 28th, 2015, 01:33 AM   #524
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Nurnberg:

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Old December 28th, 2015, 04:56 PM   #525
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Thanks for the memories. One has to wonder, though, what portion of these scenes would not exist today even if WWII did not blow them up. The global rage of the last 60 years to embrace "urban renewal" and remove old structures that may not have historic significance (other than age) may have done a good amount of damage.
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Old December 28th, 2015, 05:32 PM   #526
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If you compare to well-kept cities in Germany like Regensburg, Wismar or Lübeck, or cities in other countries - I'd say most of that would still be there. Luckily they managed to restore the roofscape of Nuremberg as good as possible. When you're standing on the Nuremberg Castle, you don't see that much of a difference.

Now if only they'd reconstruct more of the profane facades that were lost - and some lovely courtyards... It was such a picturesque medieval metropolis, with things to discover around every corner! Unparalleled in the world.
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Old December 28th, 2015, 09:29 PM   #527
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... It was such a picturesque medieval metropolis, with things to discover around every corner! Unparalleled in the world.
There remains a belief, based on assessment of facts, that this was one of the reasons why Churchill and Harris were so eager to destroy Nurnberg and other remarkable cities in Germany. They did not want much of the world's most important historic value to be located in and identified with Germany. Sort of like the mentality of the muslims destroying Palmyra. Very sad indeed.
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Old December 29th, 2015, 02:32 AM   #528
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Quote:
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If you compare to well-kept cities in Germany like Regensburg, Wismar or Lübeck, or cities in other countries - I'd say most of that would still be there. Luckily they managed to restore the roofscape of Nuremberg as good as possible. When you're standing on the Nuremberg Castle, you don't see that much of a difference.

Now if only they'd reconstruct more of the profane facades that were lost - and some lovely courtyards... It was such a picturesque medieval metropolis, with things to discover around every corner! Unparalleled in the world.
The loss of Koln and Nuremberg is heartbreaking. I wonder if there are more resources on how it looked before the bombing.
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Old December 29th, 2015, 02:36 AM   #529
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Thanks for the memories. One has to wonder, though, what portion of these scenes would not exist today even if WWII did not blow them up. The global rage of the last 60 years to embrace "urban renewal" and remove old structures that may not have historic significance (other than age) may have done a good amount of damage.
Example?
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Old December 29th, 2015, 04:58 AM   #530
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Example?
Most of Chicago.
Large parts of San Francisco.
A lot of Shanghai.

To point out a few. The Great Depression and WWII put the entire world in a 15+ slump in building maintenance, improvements, and overall care. Those that survived war were often "updated" by owners simply for a change--knock off the moldings, paint over the brass and mahogany, resurface the exteriors, or just tear things down. I suspect those urges would have been in play in some of the German cities, but Erbse shows examples where it was not the case.
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Old December 29th, 2015, 06:48 PM   #531
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When looking at old pics of Nuremberg, one can only sit down and cry. It was the most "Gothic" city in the world. Today probably Prague holds that title, but really, there was something mystic and magical about old Nuremberg, like it escaped from a medieval fairy-tale. Anyway, the reconstructed Nuremberg is one of the best examples of postwar city reconstruction, but it will never become the jewel that prewar Nuremberg was.
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Old December 29th, 2015, 11:10 PM   #532
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When looking at old pics of Nuremberg, one can only sit down and cry. It was the most "Gothic" city in the world. Today probably Prague holds that title, but really, there was something mystic and magical about old Nuremberg, like it escaped from a medieval fairy-tale. Anyway, the reconstructed Nuremberg is one of the best examples of postwar city reconstruction, but it will never become the jewel that prewar Nuremberg was.
Yes, the beauty of the German Renaissance was nowhere as well captured as the old cities of Nuremberg, Frankfurt and Koeln. One can only sit and weep at the prospect that it will never be the same. Even reconstructions aren't authentic, and you can't really get a feel of how the place would have been in 1500 AD as you probably could have done before WW2.

I think Stein am Rhein in Swizterland is a good town for Renaissance and medieval Europe, and also Regensburg, does anyone know any others?
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Old December 31st, 2015, 05:38 PM   #533
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Strasbourg remains pretty good for getting the feel of central Europe at around 1500 in a large city.
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Old December 31st, 2015, 05:47 PM   #534
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Lübeck is a fabulous medieval feeling place, too. And of course Ghent will give you a great medieval impression (Bruges is another option once you're in Flanders). Also some stretches of Prague, Thorun and Venice or Florence (which have more of a "gilded age"/renaissance feeling).

Of the smaller cities, there are much more of course, like Rothenburg ob der Tauber in Germany or Carcassonne in France.
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Old December 31st, 2015, 08:46 PM   #535
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Lübeck is a fabulous medieval feeling place, too. And of course Ghent will give you a great medieval impression (Bruges is another option once you're in Flanders). Also some stretches of Prague, Thorun and Venice or Florence (which have more of a "gilded age"/renaissance feeling).

Of the smaller cities, there are much more of course, like Rothenburg ob der Tauber in Germany or Carcassonne in France.
Out of the 'big cities' in Germany which were main centres of the HRE:

Augsburg, Nuremberg, Ulm, Frankfurt am Main, Koeln, Magdeburg, Munich - Which one was destroyed the least and which one had the best medieval centre before WW2?
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Old December 31st, 2015, 08:48 PM   #536
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Strasbourg remains pretty good for getting the feel of central Europe at around 1500 in a large city.
Weird it wasn't destroyed in WW2 as Germans invaded Alsace-Lorraine first
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Old December 31st, 2015, 09:46 PM   #537
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Out of the 'big cities' in Germany which were main centres of the HRE:

Augsburg, Nuremberg, Ulm, Frankfurt am Main, Koeln, Magdeburg, Munich - Which one was destroyed the least and which one had the best medieval centre before WW2?
Those cities were all destroyed approximately exually, it's just that some of them rebuilt their damaged buildings and respected the old street pattern (Munich), and some just didn't. IMO, the best preserved cities are Augsburg, and, of course, Munich. Magdeburg has already been destroyed once before WW2, so I don't think there was much medieval architecture left, except for its amazing churches (correct me if I'm wrong), but it had huge Gründerzeit quarters. The best medieval centre would be that of Frankfurt am Main, seriously, what an amount of timber-framed buildings, unbelievable. Braunschweig had a huge medieval old town, as well.
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Old December 31st, 2015, 10:38 PM   #538
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You have to look at Zadar too which was bombed, but was once of the main Venetian centres in the Dalmatian coast. Shame that humans decided to erase priceless heritage and history in the name of some war.

I think in CZ you have some good towns like Cesky Krumlov, Kutna Hora and Skofja Loka in Slovenia
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Old January 1st, 2016, 02:58 PM   #539
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If it doesn't have to be Germanic, the city I'd recommend is Vieux Lyon, possibly the most underrated late medieval city in Europe. It should be talked in the same breath with Bruges, Edinburgh or Strasbourg, but it never is. Even I, when I went there for the art biennale, I only knew about it stuff concerning gastronomy and football. I was very surprised to read that the old city is a Unesco WH site as a whole, and discovering it was amazing. It has the rare quality of it remaining a city in itself, sepparated from the more recent parts, because it was built on a small strip of land between a river and a tall cliff. That means that it has remained mostly the same as it was back then and that there is no mixing with the more modern city, or a transition towards it. The immersive experience it offers of a city from around 1500 is outstanding. The only similar place I can think of is Edinburgh, with the Old Town sepparated from the New Town.

If going down in the mediterranean civilization, I'd also like to recommend Girona, the catalan medieval city, which is fantastic and very little known.
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Old January 2nd, 2016, 12:22 PM   #540
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Bamberg, Regensburg, Quedlinburg, Heidelberg, Lüneburg, Görlitz, Celle, Schwerin, Erfurt, Goslar, Amberg, Eisleban, Wittenberg, Tübingen and Göttingen are among the best preserved German towns that survived WWII with little or no damage. Was there any other notable ones?

Also, I'm curious about the status of the following towns after WWII: Stralsund, Wismar, Halle and Weimar

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