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Old February 3rd, 2013, 09:12 AM   #21
musiccity
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East Nashville is where most gays in the city live so.. true dat.
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Old February 3rd, 2013, 03:11 PM   #22
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Not gays only. In some areas, gentrification is started by single professional women, in browfields mostly by artisans and creative professionals.
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Old February 17th, 2013, 04:24 PM   #23
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Bed-Stuy, a formerly dangerous neighborhood in Brooklyn, NYC seeing a beautiful revitalization.









http://adinasbrooklyn.com/our-neighborhoods/bed-stuy/
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Old February 19th, 2013, 12:55 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by musiccity View Post
Bed-Stuy, a formerly dangerous neighborhood in Brooklyn, NYC seeing a beautiful revitalization.









http://adinasbrooklyn.com/our-neighborhoods/bed-stuy/
and the hipster plague infects yet another neighborhood.........
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Old February 19th, 2013, 01:49 AM   #25
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I'd take hipsters over gangsters anyday
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Old February 19th, 2013, 03:07 AM   #26
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Awesome Bed Stuy pics. Have some friends out there who love it. One of the more dramatic changes has been in Meat Packing. 10-15 years ago, was all hookers, drug dealers, and junkies, now arguably the trendiest neighborhood in Manhattan.

See if I can find some more of Manhattan. Below, slightly different angles, and the twisty building is U/C.


http://www.thesartorialist.com/photo...-now-new-york/


http://www.worldpropertychannel.com/...-ikea-6351.php
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Old February 22nd, 2013, 05:20 AM   #27
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Quote:
Tenderloin building gets a makeover
C.W. Nevius, Chronicle Columnist
Updated 9:08 am, Thursday, February 21, 2013



Listen to how people used to describe the state of the apartment building at 850 Geary St. three years ago.

"It was just deplorable," said tenant Evangelina Avenetti. "There were literally people sleeping in the halls."

"A hellhole," said tenant Meg Bury.

"They called it the Heroin Hotel," new owner Craig Lipton said.

Don't take their word for it. The city attorney's office says the former owner, James Quinn, had more than a dozen notices of violation, ranging from bedbugs, cockroaches and mice to water leaks, a broken elevator and no heat. And that's not to mention that people who were not residents would come and go from the property at all hours.

And yet, for five years, nothing happened. Quinn ignored the notices; the tenants complained until finally Quinn was forced out.

But take a deep breath, neighbors. And stop by if you get the chance. With new paint, windows, trim and a solar electrical system, you won't recognize the place. By May, Lipton expects to begin renting a little more than half of the fully renovated studio and one-bedroom apartments in the five-story structure at rates ranging from $2,500 to $1,800 a month. He's expecting a mix of students, service workers and young urban professionals . . . .
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To


Article and all images: http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/nevius...er-4295269.php
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Old February 22nd, 2013, 11:22 PM   #28
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Yppenmarkt, Ottakring (16th district), VIENNA

The 16th district is a traditional working class and immigrant neighbourhood. Back in the monarchy it was all Bohemian, like in ethnic Bohemian. There is no big Czech community left anymore, largely because it has almost completely assimilated into Austrian mainstream (and some of their traditions have become Austrian mainstream). Nowadays the minorities there are Ex-Yugoslav (mainly Serb and Croatian) and Turkish.

The Yppenmarkt has developed into a new hipster island in a largely Turkish environment. Rents directly at the market square are already pretty expensive but in the surrounding you can still find fairly affordable flats. The Yppenmarkt is also the beginning of a largely Turkish influenced street market which is the 2nd largest market in Vienna which has retained its character so far. In any case, you can see that money is being spent for renovations and developments all across that neighbourhood. And with "SOHO in Ottakring" a yearly alternative arts festival which has still quite some underground vibe we are on a solid gentrification track with all its good and bad aspects.


http://www.gbstern.at/typo3temp/pics...5c154903a8.jpg


http://suitesculturelles.files.wordpress.com

image hosted on flickr

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8281/7...820bba45_z.jpg
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Last edited by Slartibartfas; February 22nd, 2013 at 11:31 PM.
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Old February 23rd, 2013, 07:59 PM   #29
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Quote:
Gentrification no longer a dirty word
Updated 3:02 am, Saturday, February 23, 2013
SAN FRANCISCO

A citywide surge in trendy restaurants. Runaway rental and housing rates. Construction cranes dotting the skyline. The Twitter-ization of blighted Mid-Market. Conversions of old buildings to new market-rate housing, even in the stubbornly seedy Tenderloin.

If we hadn't been told over and over that it is an evil word that should never be uttered in San Francisco, even cynics would say it is the g-word:

Gentrification.

And it's happening with surprisingly little grumbling.

"Or," says 30-year real estate veteran Joske Thompson, "I think it is a different kind of grumbling. Even the long-termers in neighborhoods are appreciating the changes. Those people in the Mission like the fact that they can walk the neighborhood and feel safer."

The difference this time is that the push is coming from the bottom up. Rather than fat-cat developers promoting ugly skyscrapers, the demand is coming from young techies who work here or in the Silicon Valley and want to preserve the feel of unique neighborhoods. Their presence is being felt not only in the Mission, where Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg now has a home, but to areas that were once considered downtrodden.

"Young people with talent are the new movers and shakers in the city," says Thompson, who says the city sells itself. "Last weekend I had some clients who were looking in the Mission. We drove by Dolores Park, and it was packed. They said, 'Is there a street fair?' "

Nope, just another afternoon in trendy town.

Dolores Park


"This is a small city of 800,000 people," says Supervisor Scott Wiener, who chairs the Board of Supervisors' Land Use and Development Committee. "And 2 to 3 million people want to live here. We just need to make sure we don't kill that quirkiness and uniqueness."

While the city experienced a similar boom in the '80s, the concern then was "Manhattanization" - and that's when gentrification became a dirty word.

"In the '70s and '80s there was massive displacement of residents in the Haight, Noe Valley and the Castro," says Randy Shaw, executive director of the Tenderloin Housing Clinic. "But now you are seeing a massive influx of upper-income people into previously unoccupied areas."

This boom has its share of concerned activists, but we have yet to see the stop-any-kind-of-development movement we saw in the '80s.

Still, higher rents are higher rents, and if monthly rates top $2,000, that will affect the entire rental stock.

"In over 30 years of doing this, I have never seen rents like this," says Delene Wolf, executive director of the city's Rent Stabilization Board. "My surmise is those Google buses must be fueling that. The whole demographic has changed . . . .

Susan Eslick, an artist, has lived in Dogpatch since 1996. Now she can walk down 22nd Street and call out the changes on every corner. There's Chocolate Lab, a local chocolate maker, Rickshaw Bagworks, which makes custom messenger bags, a cheese shop, a gourmet ice cream store and Olivier's, a French butcher shop. And perhaps most important to the transformation, Puccino Restaurant. It opened in 2006, attracting both foodies and good reviews . . . .

Dogpatch hasn't lost its funk. The Hells Angels are still there, and they're active members of the Dogpatch Neighborhood Association . . . .

http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/nevius...rd-4302093.php
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Old February 23rd, 2013, 11:33 PM   #30
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Excellent posts Cal Escapee!
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Old February 25th, 2013, 05:21 AM   #31
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Quote:
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Get a poor area, fill it with gays, then all the trendy people will start moving in, pushing the gays to the next suburb to be gentrified. That's usually how it happens.

The poor just get pushed further and further towards the periphery.
It seems to be a mixture of homosexuals, artists, students and young professionals that drive gentrification.
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Old February 25th, 2013, 05:26 PM   #32
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It seems to be a mixture of homosexuals, artists, students and young professionals that drive gentrification.
Indeed, any poor historic neighborhood in a Western City beware!
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Old March 7th, 2013, 12:04 AM   #33
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Honestly, I feel that the uprising of gentrification is mostly caused by the fact that the job market is awful so now every young person faces the necessity of going to college. Suburbs are nice for settled families who commute to work... but now few people are settled or working, or can afford to start a family. So what do they do? Flock to centralized cities where they aren't considered "poor" but instead "aspiring professionals."
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Old March 7th, 2013, 04:32 PM   #34
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Interesting point, but the prices in neighborhoods that become gentrified often skyrocket. In my home city of Nashville, the cost of a home in gentrified East Nashville is much more costly than a typical 3 bedroom home in the suburbs.
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Old March 7th, 2013, 09:16 PM   #35
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One can also observe that young families (middle class families to be precise) come back to densely developed urban areas - at last in Europe. It is mainly those who don't want to accept that just because they are raising a kid now that they have to move to the middle of knowhere in suburbia. Well designed dense urban neighbourhoods can offer things that suburbs simply can't.
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Old March 8th, 2013, 11:43 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slartibartfas View Post
Well designed dense urban neighbourhoods can offer things that suburbs simply can't.
Like what?
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Old March 8th, 2013, 07:02 PM   #37
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Like what?
Interaction with the neighborhood and it's people. Driving your car from home to work/mall and back home isn't much interaction. I live in a car dependend suburb in Belgium, I don't even know my who is living 3 houses down the road. I see my neighbours dayily and I say hi, but I don't really know them. The same cars pas my street every day, the cars of the people living on our cul de sac, the same kids ride their bikes down the road and I never see anyone else than the people living here. How are you supposed to meet others? Luckely I'm a student and most of the time I live in dense city neighborhood but shit my suburb is boring as hell.

You come from Vienna, wich has densly populated suburbs, much like city districts. So I imagine you don't really know how boring suburban living actually can be.
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Old March 8th, 2013, 08:56 PM   #38
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Quote:
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Interaction with the neighborhood and it's people.
I agree on that. And it really adds some quality to somebody´s life.
I´ve been brought up in the very centre of Vienna and I am lucky life was much more interaction with the people living in my hood/block/district, back then (early 80s, but hey, that was a completely different time in comparison to today).
But now, being a father, I start missing some green land like a small garden that belongs to me, where my kids can play and just go out whenever they want...without me being afraid of them getting hurt by traffic or some of the sick people hanging out in big cities. That´s what always will be missing in urban neighbourhoods.
For that reason I think living in "well designed dense urban neighbourhoods" (as Slartibartfas mentioned) is great - for adults. Not so much for families with children younger than teenager.
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Old March 9th, 2013, 12:17 AM   #39
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Boredom is what you make of your personal relationships, not a product of the topology of the residential areas you live in,
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Old March 9th, 2013, 05:15 AM   #40
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It's not just the interaction with the neighbours. If you live in a dense neighbourhood chances are you will have everything at a reasonable distance, including a wide variety of places to eat and shop as well as parks and squares, and you will probably be closer to where you work. With less time commuting you can have more time for yourself and your family, plus you are generating less pollution
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