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Railways (Inter)national commuter and freight trains



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Old March 1st, 2013, 01:30 PM   #41
Tom 958
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Mbuji-Mayi, Congo, 1.5m to 3.5m people depending on whose estimate you believe. It's 131 km via the area's only paved road to the nearest railroad.
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Old March 1st, 2013, 01:38 PM   #42
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New Zealand: most cities don't have rail links for passengers. In fact, the cities of Tauranga/Mt Maunganui (122,200), Nelson (61,100), Napier/Hastings (131,000), Rotorua (56,100), Whanganui (43,200), Invercargill (49,000), Gisbourne (34,400), Whangarei (52,500), Taupo (34,300) have no passenger rail services. All other cities in New Zealand have limited rail services (3 times a week each direction) between Auckland (1,507,700), Hamilton (209,300), Palmerston North (83,300), Wellington (395,600). Dunedin (126,900) has a tourist train (Taieri Gorge Railway). Christchurch (375,900) runs two railway services - the Costal Pacific (daily) between Christchurch and Picton and the TranzAlpine (daily) between Christchurch and Greymouth.

Most train services were cancelled in the early 2000's in a wave of passenger rail cuts.
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Old March 1st, 2013, 06:33 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom 958 View Post
Mbuji-Mayi, Congo, 1.5m to 3.5m people depending on whose estimate you believe. It's 131 km via the area's only paved road to the nearest railroad.
That would be a good contender since it has no railway infrastructure what so ever.

Bangui (735,000) in CAR and N'Djamena (1,6m) in Chad would be on the list too.
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Old March 3rd, 2013, 06:00 AM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Svartmetall View Post
New Zealand: most cities don't have rail links for passengers. In fact, the cities of Tauranga/Mt Maunganui (122,200), Nelson (61,100), Napier/Hastings (131,000), Rotorua (56,100), Whanganui (43,200), Invercargill (49,000), Gisbourne (34,400), Whangarei (52,500), Taupo (34,300) have no passenger rail services. All other cities in New Zealand have limited rail services (3 times a week each direction) between Auckland (1,507,700), Hamilton (209,300), Palmerston North (83,300), Wellington (395,600). Dunedin (126,900) has a tourist train (Taieri Gorge Railway). Christchurch (375,900) runs two railway services - the Costal Pacific (daily) between Christchurch and Picton and the TranzAlpine (daily) between Christchurch and Greymouth.

Most train services were cancelled in the early 2000's in a wave of passenger rail cuts.
NZ has an absolutely shocking history when it comes to trains. Even Auckland's rail network is pretty terrible for a region of 1.5 million people.
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Old March 3rd, 2013, 09:13 AM   #45
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The biggest city in Australia without passenger rail would be Hobart, capital city of the island state of Tasmania. Hobart has a population of 216,276, although there are plans for a light commuter rail system. The next largest city is again in Tasmania, Launceston with a population of 107,746. The last passenger train between these two cities (and Tasmania) ran in 1978.
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Old March 3rd, 2013, 10:44 AM   #46
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But railways in Tasmania seems still active. This rail underpass seems new: https://maps.google.ch/maps?q=Tasman...ralia&t=h&z=16 (there are remains of an old track with level crossing on the right). Is that correct?
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Old March 3rd, 2013, 08:34 PM   #47
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La Paz City in Bolivia has roughly 1 million habitants (2 million in the metropolitan area) and no train services of any kind.
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Old March 3rd, 2013, 10:09 PM   #48
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La Paz City in Bolivia has roughly 1 million habitants (2 million in the metropolitan area) and no train services of any kind.
There is a bus station designed by Gustave Eiffel, it used to be a railway station. What happend to the trains ? I presume that the high altitude and the geography is an obstacle.

Railway is a huge investment, it also demands high maintennance so lack of railways in big cities is mostly common in developing countries.

That is in countries with short sighted economy you will rather see buses than trains.
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Old March 3rd, 2013, 10:22 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by city_thing View Post
NZ has an absolutely shocking history when it comes to trains. Even Auckland's rail network is pretty terrible for a region of 1.5 million people.
Long distances and complicated terrain, very low population density and a car oriented policy regarding mobility.

NZ has put all its eggs into airplanes solving long distance travel on domestic routes, it could be a bad bet if we hit oil shortages in the future.
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Old March 3rd, 2013, 11:02 PM   #50
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Europe, North-East Asia, India and some select areas of South-East Asia. Everywhere else intercity passenger rail transport is very poor or non-existent. I bet there are several hundred 100,000+ towns on this planet with no rail transport. Mostly in poor or very poor areas, but with some prominent exceptions.
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Old March 4th, 2013, 03:38 AM   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coccodrillo View Post
But railways in Tasmania seems still active. This rail underpass seems new: https://maps.google.ch/maps?q=Tasman...ralia&t=h&z=16 (there are remains of an old track with level crossing on the right). Is that correct?
Freight trains still operate in Tasmania, yes.
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Old March 4th, 2013, 08:33 AM   #52
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Macau has no Railways, despite been a city of 400k and gambling capital of Asia. Though a metro system is under construction with a rail link to Zhuhai under proposal. Zhuhai (1.5M), the Chinese city boarding it, just got a rail link in 12/2012.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transpo...Macau#Railways
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Old March 5th, 2013, 06:15 PM   #53
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I'm really surprised that nobody's mentioned Doha and Abu Dhabi in the course of this discussion. These growing cities have huge populations, especially counting outer suburbs, and literally no rail service whatsoever.
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Old March 6th, 2013, 10:42 PM   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NordikNerd View Post
There is a bus station designed by Gustave Eiffel, it used to be a railway station. What happend to the trains ? I presume that the high altitude and the geography is an obstacle.

Railway is a huge investment, it also demands high maintennance so lack of railways in big cities is mostly common in developing countries.

That is in countries with short sighted economy you will rather see buses than trains.
Indeed, the city had a train station (actually two) and as you said it was designed by Gustave Eiffel, it served as train station and later became a the city's main bus station, a role that it still has today.

It's this one:

image hosted on flickr

terminal de buses la paz por timsnell, en Flickr

The La Paz City Central Station was closed in the mid-1990's (despite years without passenger services, and only small freight services) and today it remains on its exact same place, abandoned (notice that it still says "ENFE", which means Empresa Nacional de Ferrocarriles, the National Railways Corporation, today nonexistent):

image hosted on flickr

Estaciones por rolanlopez, en Flickr

Since the early 2000's there have been plans for reopenings, but they never have come to reality.

Why were they closed? Well, the lines (both railways and tramways) were old and in a very poor state, there was a privatisation of all the railways companies and the new owners decided it was better (for them, of course) simply to close the lines. So they closed them. The last passenger services for both stations were around 1975.

Here's one picture of the train descending into the city (taken in 1936):


Source: Tramz.com

Freight services in the 1970's:


Source: Tramz.com

Passenger services not long before their closure:

Source: Tramz.com
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Old September 23rd, 2017, 10:41 PM   #55
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São Paulo

In Brazil there are no long-distance railways at all, except for commuter lines and two privately-owned lines.
This means that the largest city without long-distance passenger rail services is São Paulo (pop. 20 million). The largest without any railway at all is Belém. Other cities without passenger trains include Campinas (pop. 2 million) and São José dos Campos (pop. 1,5 million). Even some key towns for commuter traffic have no passenger trains, such as Cajamar, Guarulhos, São Bernardo do Campo, Cotia, Embu das Artes, and Jacareí.
The nearest long-distance railway to SP leaves from Belo Horizonte (600 km away).
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