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Old March 1st, 2013, 07:53 PM   #41
Urbanista1
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haunting and amazing. so much was lost, whole civilizations. Warsaw was definitely more than the capital of some European country, it was on a par historically with London, Rome, Vienna etc. Can't get over how muc of it ws changed, especially the North-west areas of Wola and Muranow. Someone who knew pre-war Warsaw might recognize it somewhat if visiting any other area, except these.
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Warsaw Post-War Reconstruction to Present

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Old March 1st, 2013, 09:29 PM   #42
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Zamenhof street (former Dzika street) - Ludwig Zamenhof, creator of the Esperanto language



Dr. Zamenhof was born on December 15 1859 in the town of Białystok in the Russian Empire (now part of Poland). He stated that his native language was Russian, but he also spoke Yiddish and Polish; and that became the native language of his children. His father was a teacher of German, and he also spoke that language fluently. Later he learned French, Latin, Greek, Hebrew, and English, and had an interest in Italian, Spanish and Lithuanian.

In addition to the Yiddish-speaking Jewish majority, the population of Białystok was made up of Poles and Belarusians, with smaller groups of Russians, Germans, Lipka Tatars and others. Zamenhof was saddened and frustrated by the many quarrels among these groups. He supposed that the main reason for the hate and prejudice lay in the mutual misunderstanding caused by the lack of one common language. If such a language existed, Zamenhof postulated, it could play the role of a neutral communication tool between people of different ethnic and linguistic backgrounds.

As a student at secondary school in Warsaw, Zamenhof made attempts to create some kind of international language with a grammar that was very rich, but also very complex. When he later studied English, he decided that the international language must have a simpler grammar. Apart from his parents' native languages Russian and Yiddish and his adopted language Polish, his linguistics attempts were also aided by his mastering of German, a good passive understanding of Latin, Hebrew and French, and a basic knowledge of Greek, English and Italian.

By 1878, his project Lingwe uniwersala was almost finished. However, Zamenhof was too young then to publish his work. Soon after graduation from school he began to study medicine, first in Moscow, and later in Warsaw. In 1885, Zamenhof graduated from a university and began his practice as a doctor in Veisiejai and after 1886 as an ophthalmologist in Płock and Vienna. While healing people there he continued to work on his project of an international language.

For two years he tried to raise funds to publish a booklet describing the language until he received the financial help from his future wife's father. In 1887, the book titled (International language: Foreword and complete textbook) was published in Russian under the pseudonym "Doktoro Esperanto" (Doctor Hopeful). Zamenhof initially called his language "Lingvo internacia" (international language), but those who learned it began to call it Esperanto after his pseudonym, and this soon became the official name for the language. For Zamenhof this language, far from being merely a communication tool, was a way of promoting the peaceful coexistence of different people and cultures.

The Zamenhof name was first given to a fragment of the street in 1930. In 1939, the street run from the Nowolipki street, then crossed Dzielna street, Pawia, Gesia, Meizelesa, Wołyńską, Miłą, Muranowską i Niską, and ending by the Stawki and Dzika street.


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/z...menhofa_19.jpg

The tenement house where dr. Zamenhof lived and worked

http://www.fotopolska.eu/foto/225/225441.jpg


http://www.fotopolska.eu/foto/106/106183.jpg


http://kolejkamarecka.pun.pl/_fora/k...1229501698.jpg

Map of Muranow and northern Wola

http://muranowcity.w.interia.pl/images/mapa38.jpg

Next post: The Pawiak prison.
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Old March 3rd, 2013, 01:49 AM   #43
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Pawiak - The notorious Pawiak prison

The prison was built in 1830-1836 in accordance with the design by Warsaw architect Henryk Marconi.

Since 1863 the prison was a political jail with a male and female department. During the period when Poland was annexed, members of the National Government, insurgents, activists were kept imprisoned. Beside the Warsaw Citadel, Pawiak was in the times of the revolution 1905 -1907 the main political prison. So when 10 of prisoners from the PPS organization managed to escape from the jail, everyone was very impressed. Under Russian rule Pawiak was a political, investigation and criminal prison. So it was when Poland regained its independence. At this point Pawiak also became Warsaw's main prison for male criminals. (Females were detained nearby at Gęsiówka.)

1,5 ha oblong surface was used as prison area. It was surrounded by a wall with two guard towers from the side of Dzielna street and one tower from Pawia street. The main building - that was the male department was 150 m long and 12 m wide, four storeys high (basement, ground floor, first and second level). The female building called Serbia was located in a two-storey house, a former military hospital. In the complex there were also other buildings, such as warehouses, workshops, kitchen, bath, laundry, boiler house, potato house.

During the German occupation till March 1940 the prison Pawiak was ruled by the Justice Department of the General Government. In March 1940 Pawiak became an investigation prison controlled by the Security Police and Security Service of the Warsaw District, mainly by Department 4 - the Secret State Police - Gestapo. It was the largest political prison in the occupied Poland.

It is estimated that from 100,000 prisoners kept imprisoned in the years 1939 -1944 - 37,000 were executed, murdered during hearings or died in prison hospital. Firstly executions were made in the University Garden, since December 1939 till July 1941 on the peripheries of the Kampinos Forest near the Village Palmiry. Since autumn 1941 in Szwedzkie Góry, Wólka Węglowa, Laski and on dunes called Łuże, in Kabackie Forests and in Chojowskie Forests near Stefanów, in Magdalenka, in Bukowiec by Jabłonna.


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/d...elna_24_06.jpg


http://img.audiovis.nac.gov.pl/PIC/PIC_37-262-1.jpg


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/d...elna_24_02.jpg


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/d...elna_24_07.jpg

I will not post any images from the war because of their horryfic character and the will to avoid a political discussion on this thread.

Dzielna Street

http://www.muzeum-niepodleglosci.hom...39/dsc5237.jpg


http://www.muzeum-niepodleglosci.hom...39/dsc5240.jpg

Next post: Leszno street
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Old March 3rd, 2013, 02:46 AM   #44
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Oslo - Your threads are outstanding - each one is like an illustrated book. Bravo.


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Old March 3rd, 2013, 04:21 PM   #45
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Leszno street - Today Solidarity avenue

Leszno Street comes from the old route running from Warsaw to Błonia and the main road running through Jurisdictions Leszno, founded in 1648 by Count Boguslaw Leszczynski, whose name was first given to the jurisdiction offices, and then the street. In later times the street name "Leszno" was as well given to streets in other cities, which were under the Leszczynski family´s protection. The Leszno street was mainly inhabitated by German settlers of mainly Protestant denomination, which later led to the formation of the Evangelical-Reformed church and cemetery in the nearby area.

In 1882, along Leszno street was connected by a horse driven trime line running from Bielańska street to Zelazna street. Later it was converted into to electric tram line nr. 9. In 1929 the tram line was extended west to the line along Górczewska street.

In the years 1935-1938 the most distinctive building in the street, still associated with it, building the so-called. Courts in Leszno was built. During World War II, the Germans changed the name of the street to Gerichtstrasse (Judicial), since that is the street Courts Building, and the street itself was in the ghetto. The Northern side of the streetwas significantly damaged after the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. Also in 1943, the street was scene for a few executions. During the Warsaw Uprising Leszno Street was located in the center of the battle, especially the stretch within Wola borough. There, on 5 and 6 August two massacre in two hospitals was carried out by the SS. Fights for Leszno street continued until 17 August. The streets was badly damaged, although some buildings survived.

After World War II the eastern part of Leszno Street was included in the GM route (distance from the square Wronia Banking) and renamed the avenue "Świerczewskiego". A new tram line was built, and the old which linked Leszno street with Górczewska street was liquidated. In 1989 when communism fell, there were ideas to rename al. Świerczewskiego "the old Leszno", in reference to the old name, but finally in 1991 the entire alley was named in honor of the Solidarity movement.

Going from East to west.



Leszno street: Rymarska-Orla stretch

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/l.../leszno_05.jpg

Leszno street: Przejazd street - Evangelic church stretch

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/l.../leszno_09.jpg


http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_6PononYbX5...600/doc006.jpg


http://www.fotopolska.eu/foto/69/69041.jpg

Leszno street: Evangelic church

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/l.../leszno_16.jpg

Leszno street: Monastery

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/l...d/13_06_02.jpg


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/leszno/old/166.jpg

Leszno street: Solna crossing, Monastery

http://www.fotopolska.eu/foto/233/233501.jpg


http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_6PononYbX5...0/leszno-1.jpg


http://bi.gazeta.pl/im/2/5252/z52528...arnosci---.jpg

Leszno street: Karmelicka - Żelazna stretch

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/l.../leszno_08.jpg

Leszno street: Solna - Żelazna stretch

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/l...old/leszno.jpg


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/l.../leszno_04.jpg

District court - Sądy Grodzkie

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/l.../leszno_01.jpg

Leszno street: Żelazna - Wronia stretch (Western Outskirts of pre-war Warsaw)

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/l.../leszno_03.jpg

Next post: Synagogues in pre-war Warsaw.
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Old March 3rd, 2013, 07:13 PM   #46
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amazing work Oslo2022.

It would be great if someone could superimpose the street pattern of pre-war Warsaw especially in the Muranow area (with the most changes) over the street pattern of today's Warsaw, so we have an idea of how it has changed but also as a guide to exploring Muranow today, so we could identify what once stood at the present locations.
Pozdrawiam and thanks again.
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Warsaw Post-War Reconstruction to Present

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Old March 3rd, 2013, 07:23 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urbanista1 View Post
amazing work Oslo2022.

It would be great if someone could superimpose the street pattern of pre-war Warsaw especially in the Muranow area (with the most changes) over the street pattern of today's Warsaw, so we have an idea of how it has changed but also as a guide to exploring Muranow today, so we could identify what once stood at the present locations.
Pozdrawiam and thanks again.
Pre-war Muranow was Warsaw´s most congested borough, over 300 000 people lived in this area (during the existance of the Warsaw Ghetto over 1 000 000 people)

pre-war:

http://muranowcity.w.interia.pl/images/mapa38.jpg


http://www.stacjamuranow.art.pl/file...przedwojna.jpg

post-war plans: The new neighborhood was build right on the ruins (no ruins were removed) of the Jewish district. That is why the buildings today look like they were standing on top of a small hill.

http://www.stacjamuranow.art.pl/files/plannowy.jpg

2013:

http://www.stacjamuranow.art.pl/file...pa_1000pix.jpg
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Old March 3rd, 2013, 08:16 PM   #48
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Synagogi w przedwojennej Warszawie - Synagogues in pre-war Warsaw (Left bank of the river Vistula)



Before World War II the Jewish community of Warsaw, one of the largest Jewish communities in the world at that time, had over 400 houses of prayer at its disposal. However, at the end of 19th century only two of them were separate structures, while the rest were smaller chapels attached to schools, hospitals or private homes.

Unfortunately, almost no images remain of the pre-war synagogues remains, I will therefor focus on the three most important ones: Great Synagogue, Nozyk Synagogue and Cemetery Synagogue.

Wielka Synagoga - Great Synagogue
Ul. Tłomackie 7

Leander Marconi, son of Henryk, was entrusted with the honor of designing the most important synagogue for the Jewish community of Warsaw, called the Great Synagogue. Its grand opening took place on the 26th of September 1878, on the Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year’s day. Preparations for construction works, since the the decision had been made by the environment connected with the synagogue in Daniłowiczowska Street, lasted almost 20 years.

There is not much to say about the size and dimensions on the Synagogue on the basis of materials available. Only the plan of the ground floor, published in the magazine “Architekt” from 1902, shows that the length of the whole building, including wall thickness, amounted to 64 meters, while its interior was a rectangle sized 33x29 meters, close to the shape of a square. The nave was 10.5 meters broad, while the width of aisles was 8.5 meters (not including the walls). The stage measured from the most distant spot of the apse to the balustrade was 9 meters long and 3.5 meters wide. The synagogue’s vestibule formed a square, 17.5 meters long. It is easier to imagine the real size of the building knowing the number of people it could hold. This synagogue was designed for 2,400 seats, 1,800 of which were on the ground floor.

The synagogue itself existed only 60 years; the Nazis blew the building up on 16 May 1943 as a symbol oftheir triumph over the Jewish nation and the final pacification of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising.

SS-Gruppenführer Jürgen Stroop recalled:
"What a wonderful sight! I called out Heil Hitler! and pressed the button. A terrific explosion brought flames right up to the clouds. The colors were unbelievable. An unforgettable allegory of the triumph over Jewry. The Warsaw Ghetto has ceased to exist. Because that is what Adolf Hitler and Heinrich Himmler wanted."

Since the 1980s, the site has been occupied by a large skyscraper, once known as the Golden Skyscraper and currently commonly referred to as the Blue Skyscraper (Polish: Błękitny Wieżowiec).


http://www.fotopolska.eu/foto/377/377932.jpg


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/t...ynagoga_03.jpg


http://www.fotopolska.eu/foto/226/226084.jpg


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/t...omackie_08.jpg


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/t...ynagoga_10.jpg

Interior

Entrance card to the synagogue

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...rta_wstepu.jpg


http://www.fotopolska.eu/foto/86/86721.jpg

Synagoga Nożyków - Nożyk Synagogue
Ul. Twarda 6

In 1898 Zalman (Zelman, Załman) Nożyk, son of Menasze and a gallantry merchant, decided to build a synagogue in Twarda Street, although houses of prayer were already numerous in the neighborhood of Grzybowski Square. In Twarda Street alone there were eighteen small, private synagogues. In order to have the project prepared, Nożyk employed a famous Warsaw architect, Karol Kozłowski, author of the Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra Hall, the building of which had been commisioned by Leopold Julian Kronnenberg, Ludwik Grossman and Aleksander Rajchman, three Jewish financiers.

The synagogue was erected in the period of 1989-1902 to serve for the so-called “baali-batim” – middle class owners of houses, shops, workshops and small manufactures; it was they who were entitled to purchase a seat in the synagogue. The poor could only participate in the morning prayers on days when the service was held twice. In 1914, after the death of Ryfka, Zalman’s wife, the synagogue was bequeathed to the Jewish Community of Warsaw on conditions that it would be maintained from the donations of contributors and retain its full name, and that prayers for the founders would be held there on every El Male Rachamim. Until 1939, it was the Nożyk foundation, established by the Jewish Community of Warsaw, who distributed the funds for the synagogue’s maintenance according to the testamentary legacy. In 1923, the building was expanded: a choir loft designed by Maurycy Grodzieński was added.

It is the only Warsaw synagogue situated on the left bank of the Vistula river that survived World War II. (Due to lack of pre-war images of the synagogue, I will also use some modern images).


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/g...d/synagoga.jpg




http://www.sztetl.org.pl/getfile2.ph...&y=800&id=4342




http://www.sztetl.org.pl/getfile2.ph...y=800&id=15711

Interiors

http://www.sztetl.org.pl/getfile2.ph...y=800&id=68019


http://x.garnek.pl/ga8278/32deab337d..._nozykow_w.jpg

Synagoga Arona Serdynera - Aron Serdyn synagogue Current site of the Cosmopolitan skyscraper
Ulica Twarda 4 - Twarda street 4

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/t...d/twarda_4.jpg

Synagogue in the Northern Praga borough (right bank Warsaw)

http://www.twoja-praga.pl/img/miejsc...oga_praska.jpg

Synagoga cmentarna - Cemetery Synagogue
Okopowa street

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/o...ynagoga_02.jpg


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/o...a_synagoga.jpg


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...synagogi_3.JPG

Jewish cemetery along Okopowa street

http://img.audiovis.nac.gov.pl/PIC/PIC_2-6166a.jpg

Image from 1937: Grave of Ludwik Zamenhof (creator of the Esperanto language)

http://audiovis.nac.gov.pl/obraz/834...0545a2e9b4b52/

Next post: Chłodna street
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Old March 3rd, 2013, 10:29 PM   #49
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Chopin Avenue -1912

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Old March 4th, 2013, 01:17 AM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oslo2022 View Post
Plac Muranowski - Muranowski square

It was the most regular square in pre-war Warsaw. On the four sides of buildings tightly around, until 1914 it was a bustling marketplace. As in the films of Fellini - between the stalls, embossing with people at a snail's pace pushed from trams........................

In 1909, the square was connected with the Muranow tram line, which soon caused problems as it had to squeeze way between the market stalls. Muranowski Square, which gradually grew to the rank of the central point of the Jewish district, ceased to exist – like the whole area itself – in 1943 after the fall of the Ghetto Uprising. A few houses which survived were burned down during the Warsaw Uprising in 1944. The last traces of the square disappeared in 1950s.
I would say any vestiges of the square are located today somewhere in the block south-west of Andersa and Stawki.
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Warsaw Post-War Reconstruction to Present

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Old March 4th, 2013, 02:04 AM   #51
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Ulica Chłodna - Chłodna street

The street was previous a countryside road and existed certainly in the eighteenth century, it was around these years when "Chłodna" gained its proper shape, becoming a part of the Saxon axis, leading from the Mirowskie Barracks towards the village of Wola. At the time beeing the stretch was called the Wolska avenue and was first named Ulica Chłodna in 1770. The first tenement houses were built along the street as early as the end of the eighteenth century, but the real city-development construction began first after 1815, and soon a square named "under the Lion" and a local marketplace was established. Tenements were characterized by high artistic value, the expansive building development did not stop even with the outbreak of the November Uprising in 1831. After the liquidated of the Lion Square a new church named after St. Charles Borromeo was built, the street was also became important due to its growing number of industrial plants. In 1882, the street was included in the horse tram network, and in 1908 the entire street went over to using electric trams. The buildings in the street underwent nearly constant transformation between 1880 and 1900. During the interbellum (Second Polish republic) Chłodna street was one of the most important roads for crossing Warsaw (east-west) and as an exit road to Poznań.

Chłodna street: Towarowa-Żelazna stretch

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/c...hlodna_018.jpg

Chłodna street: Crossing with Wolska street

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/c...ld/rogatki.jpg

Chłodna street: Wronia-Żelazna stretch

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/c...hlodna_020.jpg

Looking in the direction of the Zelazna street

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/c...hlodna_016.jpg


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/c...hlodna_011.jpg


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/c...hlodna_021.jpg

Chłodna street: Żelazna - Biała stretch

http://www.sztetl.org.pl/getimage.ph...=obraz_639.jpg

Chłodna street: Żelazna - Waliców square stretch

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/c...chlodna_05.jpg

Chłodna street: Waliców - St. Karol Boromeusz church stretch

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/c...chlodna_03.jpg


http://www.fotopolska.eu/foto/22/22199.jpg

St. Karol Boromeusz church

http://fotopolska.eu/foto/21/21494.jpg

Interior

http://img246.imageshack.us/img246/8670/ci1.jpg

Chłodna street: St. Karol Boromeusz church - Mirowski square stretch

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/c...ld/chlodna.jpg


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/c...na_koszary.jpg

Next post: Mirowski square and the market halls.
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Old March 4th, 2013, 07:38 PM   #52
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Mirowski square
Hale Mirowskie (Mirów's Halls, formerly Trade or Marketplace Halls - Hale Targowe) are trade centers (halls) constructed in 1899-1901 in Mirów district in Warsaw. Until their destruction during Warsaw Uprising in 1944 they were the largest trade markets in Warsaw.


http://images48.fotosik.pl/238/a0f5aed6d9a2c354.jpg


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/c...koszary_03.jpg


http://mazowieckie.fotopolska.eu/foto/166/166192.jpg


http://fotopolska.eu/foto/167/167189.jpg


http://fotopolska.eu/foto/105/105923.jpg


http://kolejkamarecka.pun.pl/_fora/k...1240672630.jpg

Mirow hall - Western hall

http://www.fotopolska.eu/foto/170/170543.jpg


http://www.fotopolska.eu/foto/98/98195.jpg

Mirow hall - Eastern hall

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/m...ka_wsch_01.jpg


http://www.studiop2.pl/starawarszawa...a_brama_08.jpg


http://www.studiop2.pl/starawarszawa...a_brama_09.jpg

Interiors:

http://audiovis.nac.gov.pl/obraz/942...0c0ab97b3ed38/


http://audiovis.nac.gov.pl/obraz/942...0c0ab97b3ed38/


http://audiovis.nac.gov.pl/obraz/943...0c0ab97b3ed38/


http://audiovis.nac.gov.pl/obraz/943...0c0ab97b3ed38/


http://audiovis.nac.gov.pl/obraz/943...0c0ab97b3ed38/


http://img441.imageshack.us/img441/5...130410kl18.png

Next post: Zelazna brama/Iron gate square
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Old March 5th, 2013, 04:01 PM   #53
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Plac Żelaznej Bramy - Iron Gate square

Also known as the "market square" in pre-war Warsaw

In the 17th century, the area to the west of Warsaw's Old Town was being parceled out and rapidly built up. It was there that the widow of Jan Wielopolski founded a small town (jurydyka) named Wielopole after her late husband. The town was centered around a small market place dubbed Targowica Wielopolska, "Wielopole Market Place." Though the town was small and poor, it was probably designed by Tylman van Gameren, one of the most renowned architects of the age. The town bordered another small market town, Mirów. In the 18th century, the mighty Radziwiłł family built a palace there. The structure was later bought and expanded by the Lubomirski family, which gave their name to the palace. About the time the palace was built, the town began to prosper.

Under King August II, the area was completely rebuilt. As August was obsessed with the idea of a "Saxon Axis," he decided to demolish the poor wooden houses in the area and incorporate the market place into the city of Warsaw. The Lubomirski Palace was also to be demolished, as it was constructed some 30 degrees off the axis. However, the plan had to be called off due to financial difficulties and the eventual death of the monarch. Nevertheless, the area continued growing thanks to both the palace and the local market place. It was there that the first permanent coffee house in Warsaw was opened in 1759. It was also there, in the market place, that six large barracks of the Royal Horse Guard were built.

Canaletto painting of the Iron-gate square 1779

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi..._Canaletto.jpg

The barracks were demolished by the Russians in the 19th century. In their place a new, smaller square was created. It inherited the name "Plac Mirowski," after the village of Mirów that once stood there. Between 1899 and 1901, two large markets were built there.
The entire area, excluding the two markets, was completely demolished by the Germans in the aftermath of the 1944 Warsaw Uprising. After the war, the Saxon Garden was delimited on the west, and the place of the former iron gate is now occupied by a street.

The Lubomirski Palace was partially rebuilt, but was rotated some 30 degrees to conform to the Saxon Axis. In the 1960s, under Władysław Gomułka, the former square was built up with large apartment blocks. Even though the square no longer exists, the new buildings retain "Iron-Gate Square" addresses.


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/strony3/i...kladka_03a.jpg


http://www.cotubylo.pl/wp-content/up...012/05/01a.jpg

Overall view of the square (looking westward at the Mirow Halls)

http://www.staremiejsca.pl/zdjecie73X7X0.jpg


http://fotopolska.eu/foto/98/98203.jpg

Pałac Lubomirskich - Lubomirski palace

1775:

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/zelaznej/old/62.jpg

1800-1939

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/z...elaznej_08.jpg

Bazar Janasza - Janasz Bazaar

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/r...kowa_11_01.jpg


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/r...rynkowa_11.jpg


http://kolejkamarecka.pun.pl/_fora/k...1297169669.jpg


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/r...kowa_11_03.jpg


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/r...kowa_11_04.jpg

Gościnny Dwór - Court of hospitality (also called the Jewish market)

In 1841, in order to sort out some business in the nearby area, the jurisdiction offices Wielopole were built on Iron Gate Square for a large commercial building called the Court of the hospitality of the town or colloquially, Wielopole. The building was a landmark in the area. It had the shape of an isosceles triangle with rounded corners tightly. The design was made ​​of brick, surrounded by a cast-iron porches and arcades on pillars. His reserve was approximately 280 m above the main entrance said "Hospitable Mansion" in Polish and Russian. For the Guest Manor was easy to get, at the end of the nineteenth century there kursował tram. In the vicinity of the Guest Manor has always flourished trade, one could buy anything and it's a fairly low prices.

The building was used for trade purposes for almost 100 years until the outbreak of World War II, when, in 1939, the Germans bombed the facility.


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/z...oscinny_04.jpg


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/z...oscinny_05.jpg


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/z...oscinny_03.jpg


http://fotopolska.eu/foto/375/375993.jpg

Overview of the square looking East toward the Saxon gardens

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/z...laznej_011.jpg

Pre-war western entrance to the Saxon gardens

http://fotopolska.eu/foto/221/221529.jpg

Next post: Plac Bankowy - Bank square
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Old March 6th, 2013, 09:56 AM   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urbanista1 View Post
wonderful start to a very promising thread.

btw, you said that all the castle interiors are original as they were removed for safekeeping after 1939 invasion. where did you read this so that I can confirm the veracity of this statement? thanks?
You should check a book by Stanisław Lorentz "Walka o zamek" .

http://books.google.pl/books/about/W...d=duxKAQAAIAAJ
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Old March 6th, 2013, 03:33 PM   #55
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Plac Bankowy - Bank square

Created in the 19th century, under the Congress Kingdom, the square was designed to be one of the elegant areas of the country's capital. Notable buildings there included the Ministry of Revenues and Treasury (a building reconstructed by Antonio Corazzi) and the Bank of Poland and the Warsaw Stock Exchange (also by Corazzi). The square was originally triangular-shaped.

In the 1944 Warsaw Uprising, the buildings on the square were destroyed and the square ceased to exist. After the war, city planners reconstructed only its historic western part, reconfiguring it into a rectangle.

General overview

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/bankowy/old/18.jpg


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/b...ld/bankowy.jpg


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/b...bankowy_03.jpg


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/bankowy/old/140.jpg


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/b...bankowy_04.jpg

Former headquarter of the Bank of Poland and stock exchange

http://www.fotopolska.eu/foto/190/190591.jpg

Ministry of finance

http://www.fotopolska.eu/foto/361/361931.jpg


http://www.fotopolska.eu/foto/219/219050.jpg


http://www.fotopolska.eu/foto/245/245214.jpg

Next post: Ulica Senatorska - Senatorska street
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Old March 7th, 2013, 01:55 AM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urbanista1 View Post
haunting and amazing. so much was lost, whole civilizations. Warsaw was definitely more than the capital of some European country, it was on a par historically with London, Rome, Vienna etc.
Warsaw sure was a great city, but I honestly doubt that. Especially comparing it with Rome...
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Old March 7th, 2013, 06:56 PM   #57
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yes I agree, Rome is a stretch, nothing compares to it in Europe for historic richness.
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ten rząd wstrząsa podstawami naszej państwowości i funkcjonowania społeczeństwa. Natomiast większość społeczeństwa śpi, nie zwraca uwagi, co się dzieje i trzeba je z tego snu obudzić - Piotr S


Warsaw Post-War Reconstruction to Present
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Old March 7th, 2013, 08:17 PM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urbanista1 View Post
yes I agree, Rome is a stretch, nothing compares to it in Europe for historic richness.
Rome is just exceptionally old. In terms of aesthetics, I think there are more pleasing cities. But the specific history of Rome attracts the crowds.
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Old March 7th, 2013, 09:53 PM   #59
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Ulica Senatorska - Senatorska street

Senatorska Street roots dates back to medieval times, being like several other streets in Warsaw (for example: Dluga) important routes leading to Warsaw. It took its origin at the Gate of Krakow, where the remnants of the gate is the ending point of the street at Castle Square/Plac Zamkowy. Initially it was called the Goat and bulls street, but since the mid-sixteenth century with the construction of aristocratic residences and high royal officials the street was renamed to Senatorska street.


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/s...atorska_02.jpg


http://www.studiop2.pl/starawarszawa...bankowy_09.jpg


http://www.studiop2.pl/starawarszawa...bankowy_06.jpg


http://www.studiop2.pl/starawarszawa...bankowy_07.jpg


http://www.fotopolska.eu/foto/136/136339.jpg


https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?f...type=1&theater

Next post: Ulica Wierzbowa i Trebacka/ Wierzbowa and Trebacka street
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Old March 8th, 2013, 12:52 PM   #60
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Ulica Wierzbowa - Wierzbowa street

The road existed as early as in the fourteenth century between the fields and gardens, but it was built as a street only at the turn of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, when the Senatorska street gained importance. The Wierzbowska street name comes from one of the jurisdiction palaces offices willow, Bishop Wierzbowski, who after 1666 in the vicinity of the square that was formed by the Swedes after the demolition in 1655 of the monastery and the wooden church of St Carmelite rule. Teresa, built a palace for himself and a home for his courtiers.

At the end of the eighteenth century, the name of the street was renamed Wierzbowa. On the other side of the street stood the Ossoliński palace, which was later converted to the Brühl Palace. In 1944 most of the buildings were destroyed.


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/w.../wierzbowa.jpg

1930´s

http://img.audiovis.nac.gov.pl/PIC/PIC_1-U-6906.jpg


http://www.fotopolska.eu/foto/7/7165.jpg


http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/w...erzbowa_02.jpg

Ulica Niecała - Niecała street

http://www.fotopolska.eu/foto/327/327220.jpg

1930´s: Niecała street as seen from the Saxon gardens in the direction of Wierzbowa street

http://www.fotopolska.eu/foto/340/340700.jpg

Trebacka street

http://www.warszawa1939.pl/zdjecia/t...rebacka_10.jpg



Scheibler´s tenement house

http://www.fotopolska.eu/foto/102/102412.jpg

Looking from Wierzbowa in to Fredry street (Saxon gardens in the end of the street)

http://www.studiop2.pl/starawarszawa...c_saski_13.jpg

The street as seen from the Pilsudski square

http://www.fotopolska.eu/foto/128/128766.jpg

Next post: Plac Saski/Pilsudskiego - Saxon/Pilsudski square
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