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Old March 8th, 2013, 07:50 PM   #1
1772
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MISC | Will the US change it's visa rules for stopover passengers?

Today the US demands visas for people going through the US, but not having the US as a final destionation.

A friends of mine was going from the Netherlands to Mexiko and had to have a visa because she had a stopover in Newark. They asked her a bunch of questions and stuff; even though she wasn't going to the US.

Shouldn't the US change this? It has to kill alot of business when people try to avoid US airports.
I'd think if there was no visa requirements, more people would go through the US and the airports would have more usage = bringing in more $$.
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Old March 8th, 2013, 07:56 PM   #2
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Old March 8th, 2013, 08:01 PM   #3
diablo234
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1772 View Post
Today the US demands visas for people going through the US, but not having the US as a final destionation.

A friends of mine was going from the Netherlands to Mexiko and had to have a visa because she had a stopover in Newark. They asked her a bunch of questions and stuff; even though she wasn't going to the US.

Shouldn't the US change this? It has to kill alot of business when people try to avoid US airports.
I'd think if there was no visa requirements, more people would go through the US and the airports would have more usage = bringing in more $$.
Was your friend a citizen of the Netherlands or Mexico?

If it was the former then she would only need to have a passport as the Netherlands is covered under the Visa Waiver Program.

Visa Waiver Program

Anyways US airports are not really built to accommodate international transit passengers unlike European/Canadian airports, and it would probably be very cost prohibitive since you would have to rebuild the terminals themselves, which not make much economic sense given that most passengers are probably destined for the US anyways.
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Old March 8th, 2013, 09:24 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diablo234 View Post
Was your friend a citizen of the Netherlands or Mexico?

If it was the former then she would only need to have a passport as the Netherlands is covered under the Visa Waiver Program.

Visa Waiver Program

Anyways US airports are not really built to accommodate international transit passengers unlike European/Canadian airports, and it would probably be very cost prohibitive since you would have to rebuild the terminals themselves, which not make much economic sense given that most passengers are probably destined for the US anyways.
Swedish.

I don't get that; what would be the difference between me going from Duluth to Tampa via Atlanta than me going from London to Rio via Atlanta?
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Old March 8th, 2013, 11:11 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by 1772 View Post
Swedish.

I don't get that; what would be the difference between me going from Duluth to Tampa via Atlanta than me going from London to Rio via Atlanta?
Well Sweden is also covered under the Visa Waiver Program so she would have only been required to present a passport at most.

Anyways even if you are just hypothetically changing planes in the US from one international flight to another you are still considered to be entering the US, so it is different than someone who is traveling domestically where they can just walk to their gate. This is to make sure that no one is trying to illegally sneak into the US or is trying to smuggle contraband goods into the country, which would be a huge problem if everyone (ie domestic/international passengers) were intermingling in the same space. Even in European airports such as Frankfurt which deal with a lot of international transit passengers, people have to pass a secondary inspection for this purpose alone.
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Old March 9th, 2013, 05:53 AM   #6
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Several airlines are aware of the American visa requirements and are looking at other ways to serve their customers. For some it means providing routes that by-pass the US, for others it means building as broad a network as possible, either to serve those markets directly or to provide connecting services for those who cannot.
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Old March 9th, 2013, 06:59 AM   #7
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I wish the U.S. could at least make a few (it really doesn't have to be all) international airports allow international transits within the terminals. Some of the ideal hubs seem to already have sufficient facilities that only require a bit of modification; i'm thinking of terminals that cater to predominantly international flights: for example, Concourse J at MIA, Tom Bradley at LAX, and Terminal 4 at JFK. A complete rebuilding of terminals isn't needed at all, but rather, just the addition of a transfer area in the arrivals corridor which includes a TSA check and then a corridor/stairs/escalator/elevator back to the departures level (this is how transfers are handled in most other parts of the world). Also, the airport should dedicate said terminal (or just part of it) to international flights only, and secure the departures level in such a way that one can't illegally enter the U.S. (this involves merely making the departures TSA check one-way only; once you're past the security check into departures, you can't go back out). If the U.S. could do away with the tedious, complex, and sometimes expensive process that it forces international transiting passengers to endure, then maybe U.S. airports can become more appealing hubs to people travelling from South America to Europe and vice-versa, for example, since U.S. carriers often have the lowest fares between the two continents. Under the current system, many would-be transit passengers choose other alternatives due to reasons like the visas being too expensive, not being able to qualify, or not wanting to spend 2 or more hours going through immigrations, baggage claim, customs, and then re-checking baggage, security, etc... In a proper international terminal, these passengers would be able to go through to another country without having to officially enter the U.S. Additionally, International terminals that are more transit-passenger friendly could possibly bring in more duty free sales revenue as a result of the increase in transiting passengers.
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Old March 9th, 2013, 08:33 PM   #8
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stupid american rules! no wonder people are hating their governments everyday, i had to take another flight as well because they didn't let me go form Amsterdam to Minneapolis to a canadian city.
ps: nothing harmful will happen if someone has a transit in us airport and the states its not his final destination and most of danger in states is coming from american citizens.
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Old March 10th, 2013, 03:19 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by exseed View Post
I wish the U.S. could at least make a few (it really doesn't have to be all) international airports allow international transits within the terminals. Some of the ideal hubs seem to already have sufficient facilities that only require a bit of modification; i'm thinking of terminals that cater to predominantly international flights: for example, Concourse J at MIA, Tom Bradley at LAX, and Terminal 4 at JFK. A complete rebuilding of terminals isn't needed at all, but rather, just the addition of a transfer area in the arrivals corridor which includes a TSA check and then a corridor/stairs/escalator/elevator back to the departures level (this is how transfers are handled in most other parts of the world). Also, the airport should dedicate said terminal (or just part of it) to international flights only, and secure the departures level in such a way that one can't illegally enter the U.S. (this involves merely making the departures TSA check one-way only; once you're past the security check into departures, you can't go back out). If the U.S. could do away with the tedious, complex, and sometimes expensive process that it forces international transiting passengers to endure, then maybe U.S. airports can become more appealing hubs to people travelling from South America to Europe and vice-versa, for example, since U.S. carriers often have the lowest fares between the two continents. Under the current system, many would-be transit passengers choose other alternatives due to reasons like the visas being too expensive, not being able to qualify, or not wanting to spend 2 or more hours going through immigrations, baggage claim, customs, and then re-checking baggage, security, etc... In a proper international terminal, these passengers would be able to go through to another country without having to officially enter the U.S. Additionally, International terminals that are more transit-passenger friendly could possibly bring in more duty free sales revenue as a result of the increase in transiting passengers.
My point exactly.
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