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Old March 14th, 2013, 12:23 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by ja.centy View Post
An impressive castle/manor, which until WW1 had housed the extensive (private) art collection including works by Leonardo da Vinci, Rubens, Caravaggio and Jan Matejko.

Sadly, after WW1 the castle was confiscated by Lithuanian state from its owners, the Tyszkiewicz family.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raudondvaris_Castle

LOL. It was confiscated by germans during WWI (used as Oberost HQ). After WWI there were no library, art gallery etc.Maybe it would be more wisely to keep the castle empty... but it would be ...odd))). And quite large part of Tiškevičiai/Tyszkiewicz familly (particularly from Žeimaitija) members became citizens of Lithuania, for instance, Kazimieras Viktoras Tiškevičius and others. You should understand that after 1918 (after so called land reform) mostly all nobles lost large parts of their estate lands in Lithuani, so there were no use of holding it. Feudal remnants were abolished. So estates -> fabrics ( for example, Kretinga manor by Kazimieras Justinas Tiskevičius).

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Old March 14th, 2013, 02:09 AM   #22
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Krzyżtopór Castle

Krzyżtopór was built by Krzysztof Ossoliński between 1621 and 1644 (dates vary because no documents about the building construction survived). It was most likely the most lavish palace in the Commonwealth and possibly Europe. Built in the Polish mannerist and early Baroque style in a symmetrical pattern, it had 4 main towers representing the seasons, 12 hallways, or ball rooms, representing the months, and 365 windows ( I have found no evidence supporting that 1/4 of a window existed, or if they built a 366th one every four years). Its also supposedly housed a large aquarium on the ceiling of one of its towers containing exotic fish.

For more info here is a website in both Polish and English http://www.krzyztopor.org.pl/zamek/index.php?lang=en

Some pics of the castle today ( it was damaged heavily during the Deluge and was later abandoned, being sacked as recently as WWII)...







... and what it looked like before Sweden attempted to turn it into an IKEA.







Pictures not mine, quit bothering me!
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Old March 14th, 2013, 02:30 AM   #23
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Are there any plans to restore this castle?
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Old March 14th, 2013, 03:07 AM   #24
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Mir Castle


The Mirsky Castle Complex (Belarusian: Мірскі замак), is a UNESCO World Heritage site in Belarus located in the town of Mir in the Karelichy District of the Hrodna voblast, at 53°27′4.46″N 26°28′22.80″E, 29 km to the north-west from another World Heritage site, Nesvizh Castle.
The construction of the castle began at the end of the 15th century, in the Gothic architecture style. Building of the castle was completed by Duke Ilinich in the early 16th century near village Mir (formerly of Minsk guberniya). Around 1568 the Mir Castle passed into the hands of Mikołaj Krzysztof "the Orphan" Radziwiłł, who finished building the castle in the Renaissance style. A three-storey palace was built along the eastern and northern walls of the castle. Plastered facades were decorated with limestone portals, plates, balconies and porches.

After being abandoned for nearly a century and suffering severe damage during the Napoleonic period, the castle was restored at the end of the 19th century. In 1813, after the death of Dominik Hieronim Radziwiłł, the castle passed into the hands of his daughter Stefania, who married Ludwig zu Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg. The castle later fell into the hands of their daughter Maria, who married Prince Chlodwig Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst.


View from the courtyard
Their son, Maurice Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst sold the castle to Nikolai Sviatopolk-Mirski, of the Bialynia clan, in 1895. Nikolaj's son Michail began to rebuild the castle according to the plans of architect Teodor Bursze. The Sviatopolk-Mirski family owned the castle up to 1939.
During World War II, it came under the dominion of the Nazi occupying force and served as a ghetto for the local Jewish population prior to their liquidation. Between 1944 and 1956, the castle was used as a housing facility, which partially damaged the castle's interior.
In December, 2000, the Mir Castle was listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site





















source

thread on SSC:
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=653165
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=896926

Castle in 1876








source
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Old March 14th, 2013, 04:29 AM   #25
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Are there any plans to restore this castle?

Plans Yes, funding No, Although I do have faith that it will be restored by the end of the century. Perhaps after Europe Rises from this crisis there will be more time and resources to rebuild it.
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Old March 14th, 2013, 04:38 AM   #26
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Quote:
Korkh.;101218964








source


I always enjoy seeing beautiful restorations. Cheers.
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Old March 14th, 2013, 04:35 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Depeched View Post
Other Tiesenhausen palace in Lithuania, Rokiškis
Grand Duchy of Lithuania
There was no Commonwealth or Grand Duchy anymore, when this building was built. It doesn't make it any less prettier, but it's just a common manor house.

Stay on the topic Depeched.
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Old March 14th, 2013, 05:54 PM   #28
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I hope that Ruzhany, Tulchyn, Krzyztopor, etc. will be rebuilt someday. It's a great news that Pidhirtsi Castle/Palace is being renovated.

Thank you for all the beautiful photos. Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth was a wonderful country with so many outstanding palaces, castles, cities and towns.
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Old March 14th, 2013, 09:44 PM   #29
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Vilnius had an abundance of magnificent palaces. All of them however, lost their splendor, thanks to a certain barbarian neighbor from the east. Some were torn down completely. Treasures and priceless cultural artifacts are obviously gone, scattered around the museums and private collections all over the world... Lately though, the process of restoration is starting to pick up the pace.


Sapieha palace

Built in 1689-1692 according to the project of Giovanni Battista Frediano for Field Hetman of Lithuania and Voivode of Vilnius Jan Kazimierz Sapieha the Younger (Lith. Jonas Kazimieras Sapiega jaunesnysis).

Mutilation of the palace was started by the Russians, who turned it into a military hospital and later into military dorms. Poles then turned it into a hospital again, before rebuilding it finally for the needs of a university institute. Last year, the restoration of the palace back to it's original form had finally started.









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Old March 14th, 2013, 09:52 PM   #30
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Am I the only one expecting palaces of the former British commonwealth? Anyway, that Krzyżtopór Castle is amazing. Has anybody additional knowledge about its creator, Lorenzo Senes?
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Old March 14th, 2013, 10:08 PM   #31
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Slushko Palace

Built for Voivode of Polotsk Dominik Słuszko (Lit. Dominykas Sluška) in 1690-1694.

After the partitions, the baroque palace was confiscated by the tsarist government and rebuilt into an apartment house, a brewery and finally into a military prison.

1937. Still a prison.



At the moment the building serves the needs of Vilnius music and theater academy, which is set to move to new facilities.

In 2005


Just as the Sapieha palace, the Slushko palace will be restored to it's original baroque form.

[IMG]http://www.************/forumas/picture.php?albumid=1068&pictureid=31612[/IMG]
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Old March 14th, 2013, 10:27 PM   #32
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Palace of the bishops of Vilnius

Built according to the project of Laurynas Gucevičius, in neoclassical style in the late 18th century.

1830.


The main building was demolished during the tsarist times. It will be rebuilt. It's just a matter of time and money.




The two side buildings did however survive.

image hosted on flickr

Verkių rūmai by sim_t_as, on Flickr
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Old March 14th, 2013, 11:04 PM   #33
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Another palace in Vilnius that will (eventually) be fully rebuilt.

Radvilos palace

One of many Radvilos (Pol. Radziwill) family estates in Vilnius. This late renaissace residence was built for Voivode of Vilnius and Field Hetman of Lithuania Jonušas Radvila (Pol. Janusz Radziwill), according to the project of Dutch architect Jan Ulrich, in manneristic style, in 1635-1653.

Partially restored northern wing of the building survives to this day. Russians blew up parts of the building while filming a WW2 movie...






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Old March 15th, 2013, 01:18 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ∆∆∆ View Post
Am I the only one expecting palaces of the former British commonwealth? Anyway, that Krzyżtopór Castle is amazing. Has anybody additional knowledge about its creator, Lorenzo Senes?
Again very few documents about the castles construction survived, but he was Italian, why? because Polish people love Italian architects! Yes you are the only one expecting palaces of the former British commonwealth probably because the british commonwealth still exists making the word "former" pointless. Also Eastern Europe doesn't get enough attention .
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Old March 15th, 2013, 02:41 AM   #35
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Biržai Castle, Lithuania

Built by the order of Kristupas Mikalojus Radvila "Perkūnas" (Krzysztof Mikolaj "the Thunderbolt" Radziwill) in 1589 in Renaissance style.

image hosted on flickr

Birzai castle. Winter by limajulija, on Flickr


image hosted on flickr

Birzai castle. Summer by limajulija, on Flickr


image hosted on flickr

Biržai castle by limajulija, on Flickr
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Old March 15th, 2013, 11:05 AM   #36
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Ruzhany Palace


Ruzhany Palace (Belarusian: палац у Ружанах) is a ruined palace compound in Ruzhany village, Pruzhany Raion (district), Brest voblast (province), Western Belarus. Between the 16th and 19th centuries Ruzhany (then called Różany) was the main seat of the senior line of the Sapieha noble family, known as the Sapiehowie-Różańscy ("the Sapiehas of Różany").

History

Rużhany began its life in the late 16th century as the site of Lew Sapieha's castle. The Sapieha residence was destroyed in the course of the internecine strife in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania when it was attacked by Michał Serwacy Wiśniowiecki's forces in 1700.
Różany was rebuilt as a grand Neoclassical residence in the 1770s by Aleksander Michał Sapieha. The architect was Jan Samuel Becker from Saxony. The palace was set in an English park. Apart from the palace, there were a theatre (1784–88), an orangery, and several other outbuildings. It was Becker who designed the local church (rebuilt in the 1850s).
By the time of King Stanisław II's visit in 1784, work on the palace had been suspended. The Sapieha estates were nationalised in the aftermath of the November Uprising (1831). Three years later, the palace compound was sold to Ari Leib Pines to be used as a textile mill and weaving factory. see copy of deed, at
In 1914 the palace was accidentally set on fire by factory workers. The First World War and subsequent financial hardships prevented the building's restoration until 1930. The partially restored palace was ruined in 15 years, a casualty of the Second World War. The ornate palace gate survives and has recently been repaired.








source







Before


source

After








source

photo thread on SSC: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1072633
thread about restoration on SSC: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1512958
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Old March 15th, 2013, 04:13 PM   #37
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During Sapieha times, they were true rulers of Lithuania
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>> MY PHOTO THREAD ABOUT LITHUANIA
>>MY PHOTOS FROM KLAIPĖDA (MEMEL)
>>> OLD LITHUANIA



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Old March 16th, 2013, 12:25 AM   #38
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Lublin castle (Signage place of the Union of Lublin act)
Crown of the Kingdom of Poland



The Lublin Castle (Polish: Zamek Lubelski) is a medieval castle situated in Lublin, Poland, adjacent to the Old Town district and close to the city center. It is one of the oldest preseved Royal residencies in Poland, established by king Casimir II the Just.

he hill on which it is located was first fortified with a wood-reinforced earthen wall in the 12th century. In the first half of the 13th century the stone keep was built which survives to this day and is the tallest building of the castle, as well as the oldest standing building in the whole city. In the 14th century, during the reign of Casimir the Great, the castle was rebuilt with stone walls. Probably at the same time the castle's Holy Trinity church was built to serve as a royal chapel. In the first decades of the 15th century king Władysław II commissioned a set of wall paintings for the chapel, which were completed in 1418 and are preserved to this day. The author was a Ruthenian Master Andrej, who signed his work on one of the walls. Due to their unique style, mixing Western and Eastern Orthodox influences, they are acclaimed internationally as an important historical monument.

Under the rule of the Jagiellon dynasty the castle enjoyed royal favor and frequent stays by members of the royal family. In the 16th century it was rebuilt on a grandiose scale, under the direction of Italian masters brought from Kraków. The most momentous event in the castle's history was the signing in 1569 of the Union of Lublin, the founding act of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.



As a consequence of the wars in the 17th century (The Deluge) the castle fell into disrepair. Only the oldest sections, the keep and the chapel, remained intact. After Lublin fell under Russian rule following the territorial settlement of the Congress of Vienna in 1815, the government of Congress Poland, on the initiative of Stanisław Staszic, carried out a complete reconstruction of the castle between 1826 and 1828. The new buildings were in English neogothic style, completely different from the structures they replaced, and their new purpose was to house a criminal prison. Only the keep and the chapel were preserved in their original state.

The castle served as a prison for the next 128 years: as a Tsarist prison from 1831 to 1915, in independent Poland from 1918 to 1939, and most infamously during the Nazi occupation of the city from 1939 to 1944, when between 40,000 and 80,000 inmates, many of them Polish resistance fighters, passed through the prison.

Just before withdrawing in 1944, the Nazis massacred its remaining 300 prisoners. After 1944 the castle continued to serve as a prison of Soviet secret police and later of the People's Republic of Poland, and until 1954 about 35,000 Poles opposing Soviet occupation of their country rule passed through it, of whom 333 lost their lives. In 1954 the castle prison was finally closed.

Following reconstruction and refurbishment, since 1957 it has been the main site of the Lublin Museum.


http://www.fotopolska.eu/foto/235/235415.jpg

Courtyard

http://www.fotopolska.eu/foto/113/113702.jpg


http://x.garnek.pl/ga6298/32ecf1ddec...w_lublinie.jpg

Castle tower from the XII-century

http://centralny.info/site_media/nic...907e449d8c.jpg



Royal chapel of the holy trinity from 1418

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...r%C3%B3jcy.jpg

Interior

http://www.lubelskie.pl/img/userfile...in/kaplica.jpg


http://bi.gazeta.pl/im/5/4116/z4116425X.jpg


http://bi.gazeta.pl/im/6/4670/z46701...z-freskami.jpg
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Old March 16th, 2013, 03:02 AM   #39
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Are there any drawings, sketches, or paintings of the castle before it was rebuilt in the Neo-Gothic style?
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Old March 16th, 2013, 07:32 AM   #40
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These are absolutely magnificent.
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“The meaning of earthly existence lies not, as we have grown used to thinking, in prospering but in the development of the soul.”
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"We are more closely connected to the invisible than to the visible"

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