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Old October 5th, 2013, 08:11 PM   #81
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Tyszkiewicz Palace in Zatrocze


Please note that palace was built in 1896-1901, under Russian rule.
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Old October 6th, 2013, 04:27 PM   #82
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Rydzyna castle - Rydzyna, Poland
Crown of the Kingdom of Poland



The castle in Rydzyna was built at the beginning of 15th century by Jan of Czernina. At the end of the 17th century Italian architects Joseph Simon Bellotti and Pompeo Ferrari erected the present Baroque castle on its ancient foundations. The first owners of the castle were the Leszczyński family. Together with a park and surrounding areas, it was one of the most splendid palaces in Great Poland.

The residence was built by Giuseppe Simon Belotti from Lugano, at the and of 17th century. Not only was he an architect but also a manager of stucco workshops and a supervisor of decorative works made by Italian plasterers and sculptors. Belotti designed the Leszczyńskis’ Palace in ‘palazzo in modo fortezza’ style, following the example of Poggio Reale by Sebastiano Serlio (Serliano). Another Italian artist who settled in Poland, Michelangelo Palloni from Florence, decorated ceilings in the palace in Rydzyna with splendid frescos. At the beginning of the 18th century Pompeo Ferrari came to Rydzyna. He was a talented architect from Rome, laureate of the St. Lucas Academy. He settled here for the rest of his life and after his death in 1736 was buried in the parish church. Pompeo Ferrari designed the Rydzyna palace reconstruction which was the beginning of the famous urban planning of Rydzyna, whose aim was to join the palace and the town in a harmonious composition. Apart from that he was a designer of other magnificent buildings in Wielkopolska (Great Poland). Other artists under the artistic patronage of the Leszczyński family were three brothers Catenazzi from Morbio Inferiore in Mendrisiotto, (in Ticino, Switzerland). The splendid heritage of the past has been carefully protected in Rydzyna, where people always remember creators of beauty.

From 1704–1709 it was the residence of Polish king Stanisław Leszczyński. In 1709, during the Great Northern War, the castle was partly burnt by the tsar's soldiers. However, wall-paintings and stucco works in the representative rooms, made by Italian artists, were not destroyed completely. After this period Stanisław Leszczyński was forced to abdicate the Polish throne and was exiled to France. After years, as Duke of Lorraine, he became a famed as a charitable and wise sovereign. His daughter Maria became queen of France and was the grandmother of King Louis XVI.

Stanisław Leszczyński sold his estates in Poland to Aleksander Joseph Sułkowski. The new owner improved the castle. The Silesian architect Karl Martin Frantz changed roofs, added Rococo decorations and the monumental main gate. He also rebuilt the parish church and the town. The son of Aleksander Joseph, Prince August, continued the expansion. Classical ornamentation was added to the Ballroom. The outbuildings and Orangerie were added to the north of the palace. At the end of the 18th century the residence of the Sułkowski princes, with open-air theater and high school of Piarist Fathers, was the most important cultural and educational center in Great Poland.

After the second partition of Poland in 1793, the architectural development in Rydzyna ceased. Two of the Sułkowskis of Rydzyna were covered with glory: brave and talented Joseph Sułkowski, the aide-de-camp of Napoleon, killed in action at Cairo and his cousin Anthony Paul - the fourth Sułkowski owner of Rydzyna - whose name is inscribed on the Arch de Triomphe in Paris. The last Prince Sułkowski died childless in 1909. The Castle was taken over by Prussian authorities. In 1919 the Versailles Treaty gave it back to Poland.

During the German occupation, 1939–1945, a "Hitlerjugend" (see National Political Institutes of Education) school was placed in the castle. At the end of January 1945 the Castle in Rydzyna was burnt by the Red Army. The severely damaged Castle awaited a new owner until 1970, when was taken over by The Association of Polish Mechanical Engineers (S.I.M.P.) and rebuilt according to documents and photographs from before World War II. The work was completed in 1989. In 1994 the castle was awarded by the prestigious international organization Europa Nostra in recognition of the excellence of the restoration work. Original equipment and furnishing from the Castle were lost before World War I. The main Baroque rooms were completely restored to their original grandeur according to the historic documentation. In the castle collections there are: old furniture, historical drawings, remembrances of the Sułkowski family, nature collections e.g.: tropical butterflies, hunting trophies. In the library one can find documentation connected with the previous owners of the Castle, The Sułkowski Grammar School and The Association of Polish Mechanical Engineers.

Rydzyna:

http://bi.gazeta.pl/im/0/11506/z1150...-Ostrowski.jpg


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...yna2_Apr05.jpg

Exterior of the castle

http://s8.flog.pl/media/foto/6284877...ulkowskich.jpg


http://s2.flog.pl/media/foto/5146686...czynskiego.jpg


http://s2.flog.pl/media/foto/mayday_...70e187e072.jpg


http://regionwielkopolska.pl/pub/gal...ig-galeria.jpg

Interiors

http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e2...e/rydzyna5.jpg

Hall of the four seasons




http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e2.../rydzyna12.jpg

Naval hall

http://galeriawielkopolska.info/zdje.../rydzyna19.htm


http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e2.../rydzyna21.jpg

Ball hall

http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e2.../rydzyna28.jpg


http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e2.../rydzyna29.jpg

Knights hall

http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e2.../rydzyna48.jpg
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Old October 8th, 2013, 05:58 PM   #83
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Sandomierz Royal castle - Sandomierz, Poland
Crown of the Kingdom of Poland


The Sandomierz Royal Castle is a medieval structure in Sandomierz, Poland. It was built on a slope of Vistula River by Casimir III the Great and extended in the 16th century. The original building was blown up in 1656, leaving only the west wing standing. It was later transformed into a Renaissance styled residence with the west wing preserved as a museum.

The 14th-century castle was built on the site of the existing stronghold in the 10th century. Between 1146-1166 it was the seat of Prince Henry of Sandomierz, son of Bolesław III Wrymouth.

The Gothic castle was built by Casimir the Great. The remnants of the Gothic structure are visible in the foundations of the octagonal tower of the south corner, which is the oldest part of the monument. The existing tower was built during the reign of Casimir IV Jagiellon in the 15th century as an integral part of the so-called Great House, the seat of the prince.

During the reign of Sigismund I the Old and Sigismund II Augustus, the castle was enlarged. The Sigismund the Old's cornerstone preserved above the entrance on the east side of the array. It bears the date 1520 and a cartouche with Sigismund's eagle. The construction was supervised by the Royal architect Benedyct Sandomierski, who erected two-storey arcaded cloisters around a closed courtyard.

During the Deluge the castle was blown up by the retreating Swedish troops of general Sincler. About fifty Poles, who entered the abandoned castle, were killed. The survived western wing of the castle was later rebuilt during the reign of king John III Sobieski between 1680-1688.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...Sandomierz.JPG


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...ek_-_ZJ001.jpg


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...omierz_025.jpg

Interiors

http://www.zamek-sandomierz.pl/image...a/kuchnia2.jpg


http://www.fluidi.pl/grafiki/0088/8850_P_199884527.jpg


http://www.zamek-sandomierz.pl/image...heologia02.jpg


http://www.wrota-swietokrzyskie.pl/i...=1313899453825


http://www.wrota-swietokrzyskie.pl/i...=1313899454103
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Old October 8th, 2013, 06:26 PM   #84
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Szydlowiec Castle - Szydlowiec, Poland
Crown of the Kingdom of Poland



From the 12th century the environs of Szydłowiec belonged to the powerful knightly family of Odrowąż, who were descended from Moravian-Bohemian Baworowic family.

In the 13th century the site of the present castle was occupied by a stronghold on an artificial island with wood and earth defences and by a village called Szydłowiec. The present town came into being in the early 15th century and together with the neighbouring estate was the property of the Szydłowiecki and Radziwiłł families until the 19th century.

The town flourished in the 16th and the first half of 17th centuries. It was then an important centre of trade and crafts, mainly stone-masonry based on the exploatition of the local sandstone which was easy to work. This stone was used to carve architectural sculptural elements and to make tools for agriculture. It was also a building material for the local Saint Sigsmunt Church, Castle in Szydłowiec and the Town hall in Szydłowiec; moreover, it was sent to Kielce, Cracow and Warsaw.


http://portalszydlowiecki.pl/wp-cont...zy-bramnej.jpg


http://portalszydlowiecki.pl/wp-cont...-szydlowcu.jpg


http://portalszydlowiecki.pl/wp-cont...-szydlowcu.jpg

Courtyard

http://portalszydlowiecki.pl/wp-cont...-szydlowcu.jpg


http://portalszydlowiecki.pl/wp-cont...-szydlowcu.jpg

Loggia

http://portalszydlowiecki.pl/wp-cont...-szydlowcu.jpg


http://portalszydlowiecki.pl/wp-cont...-szydlowcu.jpg

Interiors

http://imageshack.us/a/img819/2946/0080100.jpg


http://imageshack.us/a/img853/4144/0080139.jpg


http://imageshack.us/a/img215/3117/0080148.jpg


http://imageshack.us/a/img820/4200/0080014.jpg


http://imageshack.us/a/img11/1462/0080192.jpg


http://imageshack.us/a/img35/9494/0080224.jpg
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Old October 8th, 2013, 07:31 PM   #85
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It is off topic, but I still didn't find plans of Sandomierz cityhall
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Old October 8th, 2013, 09:18 PM   #86
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Why do you need those plans (if I may ask)?
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Old October 9th, 2013, 05:52 PM   #87
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Depeched View Post
It is off topic, but I still didn't find plans of Sandomierz cityhall
Renaissance city hall in Sandomierz - Sandomierz, Poland
Crown of the Kingdom of Poland

Sandomierz gothic town hall built in the XIII century with later reneissance elements added. It is one of the best preserved historic (pre-partition) town halls in this part of Europe. It has remained unchanged since XVII century.


http://krodo.pl/upload/places/place_...0155471508.jpg


http://i1.trekearth.com/photos/90054/san.jpg

Interiors

http://www.zamek-sandomierz.pl/image...sz/ratusz2.jpg


http://www.fluidi.pl/grafiki/0081/8194_P_599426841.jpg


http://www.zamek-sandomierz.pl/image...sz/ratusz3.jpg
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Old October 10th, 2013, 01:44 AM   #88
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Quote:
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Why do you need those plans (if I may ask)?
i am working with reconstrucion of one of city hall of Lithuania, I need to campare plans
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Old October 10th, 2013, 09:01 PM   #89
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i am working with reconstrucion of one of city hall of Lithuania, I need to campare plans
I see. Then make some effort and find it yourself, if you want.

PS. I don't like cheeky Lithuanians.
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Old October 10th, 2013, 09:08 PM   #90
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I see. Then make some effort and find it yourself, if you want.

PS. I don't like cheeky Lithuanians.
....

I don't wanna play your games, dude.
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Old October 29th, 2013, 12:06 AM   #91
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Palace in Kurozwęki - Kurozwęki, Poland
Crown of the kingdom of Poland



Kurozwęki, at its height a small town of some importance, was first mentioned in 1246 as a village in the possession of the Duchy of Kraków. It was then that a certain count de Kurozwansch first appears in a document issued by Bolesław the Chaste, Duke of Sandomierz and Kraków. The village was then a fief of the Poraj family, a family which is said to have originated in Bohemia and arrived in Poland with St. Wojciech (also known as St. Adalbert), the future martyr and patron saint of Poland.

Gradually, through their loyal support of king Władysław the Elbow-High and his successors Casimir the Great and Louis I, the Kurozwęki branch of the Poraj family grew in importance. At the height of the family’s importance in the 1380s Dobiesław of Kurozwęki, became chancellor of Kraków while his son Zawisza, Bishop of Kraków and Chancellor of Poland led a triumvirate which ruled the kingdom while Louis I, (also king of Hungary and Croatia) busied himself with ruling his other possessions. While Zawisza of Kurozweki became well known for his lavish lifestyle, he also deserves to be remembered as the founder of the Chapel of Saint Mary, which to this day forms part of the Wawel, Kraków’s royal castle.

The growing influence and wealth of the Kurozwęki Poraj family (now increasingly know as the Kurozwęcki family) allowed for successive generations to expand and consolidate their possessions. It was during this period (the second half of the XIV century) that an oval stone keep was built. The castle was probably built to replace a smaller wooden fort built on what was then a small hill overlooking a large expanse of swampy ground in the basin of the Czarna river, which placed the castle in an easily defensible position.
One would have probably entered the castle through south-facing gates over which rose a large, square, four-storey tower, which provided living quarters, an observation point and a granary. One would then have walked into a courtyard paved with flagstones and enclosed by a number of wooden buildings.

In 1400 we have the first mention of the castle itself, described as Castrum Curoswank.
The construction of the stone castle should probably be attributed to Dobiesław of Kurozwęki (d.1397, also known as Dobiesław of Chodów) and/or to his son, also named Dobiesław, the first Poraj to use the title de Kurozwanky.

During the course of the 15th century the Castle underwent several redevelopments intended to change the defensive medieval structure into a more comfortable residence which would reflect the family's wealth and influence: the wooden buildings which filled the courtyard were gradually rebuilt as spacious stone and brick living quarters, all the while maintaining the integrity of the Castle's defensive walls. Indeed, the thick, curved, 14th century walls were never entirely destroyed and are still visible in parts of the Palace where they form the foundations of later structures.

The last of the Kurozwęcki line, Mikołaj Lubelczyk and his son Hieronim finally finished the process of replacing wood with stone structures.

After his death around the year 1520, one of Hieronim's two daughters, Anna, married a local nobleman, Jan Lanckoroński, bringing him Kurozwęki as her dowry. Henceforth, Kurozwęki would become the home of the Lanckońcki family.

The castle remained unchanged until the second half of the 16th century, when a portion of the north-west defensive wall was demolished and replaced with a three-storey corner structure probably built so that the family could live in a comfortable and elegant residential wing. It was also during this period that a rectangular gatehouse was built on the south side of the palace (where the faēade now stands).

During the second half of the 16th century, Krzysztof Lanckońcki converted to Calvinism, and determined to instil the Protestant message in the local population, expelled the congregation of Augustinian monks (brought to Kurozweki in 1487), and stripped the Church of its ornaments. He became an elder of the Calvinist Church and an outspoken defender of religious freedom in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Krzysztof's son, Zbigniew, converted back to Catholicism and attempted to undo his father's actions: he invited the Augustinian monks back to Kurozwęki, reconsecrated the local Church, and moved the Castle's chapel to its current location in the eastern wing of the castle.

The castle was once again remodelled in the 17th century when the collection of disparate buildings forming the west and east wings of the palace were melted together around today's courtyard.

The two-storey cloister arcades lining the southern, northern and western sides of the courtyard were built towards the end of the 17th and the start of the 18th century. It was also around this time that the level of the ground floor was raised by about a meter and a half in response to a rise in groundwater levels. As a consequence of this, the ground floor became a rather ornate and well-built basement.

In 1747, Stanisław Lanckoroński dies childless, leaving his estate to his widow, Anna Dembińska, who then went on to marry an army general, Maciej Sołtyk in 1752. He would go on to have a successful political career, becoming Castellan (Kasztelan) and later Voivode (Wojewoda) of the Sandomierz region. Anna and Maciej would rebuild the Palace, giving it its current appearance. The reconstruction, which began in 1768 and ended only in 1772 completely transformed the castle into a more elegant residence: The old entrance gate was incorporated into the rectangular northern wing which now constitutes the faēade and ballroom of the palace. The interiors of the Palace's first floor (the living quarters, dining rooms, library) were redecorated in a light Rococo style, complete with ornate plasterwork friezes, while the walls of the chapel were repainted with murals depicting the transfiguration of Christ and the patron saints of the owners. The two pavilions of the estate also seem to have been built around this time.

The faēade itself is a celebration of Anna and Maciej's marriage: the ornate relief at the top of the faēade contains the linked coat of arms of both families, while sculpted relief on the sides (also called cartouche) contain the initials of the married couple.

In 1787, Stanisław August Poniatowski, the last king of Poland, visited the Palace on his way back from a meeting with the Tzarina of Russia. The king's brief visited was celebrated with a great banquet in the ballroom decorated with the portraits of the last Sołtyk heirs of Kurozwęki. His stay was recorded by one of his favourites, the poet and historian Adam Naruszewicz, who described a great ball and a long night of dancing and celebratory canon salvoes in honour of the returning king as well as a a 'beautiful and spacious ballroom whose walls were decorated here and there with delicate landscape paintings'.
It was the third wife of Maciej Sołtyk, Cunegonde (born Koszowska) who gave Kurozwęki in her will to her brother in law, Tomasz Sołtyk the castellan of Zawichost.

When Tomasz's son, Antony Tomasz Sołtyk, decided to settle into Kurozwęki in 1811, he found a crumbling castle and an estate impovrished by the successive uprisings and wars which followed the partitions of Poland in 1772, 1793 and 1795.

At the turn of the century, the artistically talented Anastazja Sołtyk and her husband decided to remodel the Palace gardens in accordance with romantic ideals and employed a Czech landscape artist called Jan Zulauf to direct the works. It seems that Zulauf was quite sucessful: by 1820 he was working for the powerful Lubomirski family and visitors to Kurozwęki wrote admiringly about the understated charm of its English garden.

Emilia, the daughter of Antoni Tomasz and Anastazja, marrried Paweł Popiel in 1833 offering him Kurozwęki as part of her dowry. The young couple moved here in 1840, after Paweł 's family residence in Ruszcza near Kraków was destroyed in a fire.

By 1840 the thirty-three year old owner of the castle had already made a name for himself: having completed his law degree in Paris, he had fought in the 1830-1 November Uprising against the Russian occupier. While he became well-known in Kraków as an essayist, editor and political leader, in Kurozwęki he is chiefly remembered as the person who divided up the ballroom into smaller rooms, declaring it inappropriate to organise grand festivities in an occupied Poland. Needless to say, Poland is now free and the ballroom restored to its original size.

Towards the end of his life, Paweł, now an local conservative politician, handed over the management and ownership of Kurozwęki to his eldest son Marcin. The Popiel family would be increasingly preoccupied with turning a profit from the estate's farmland, fish-ponds and forests, a long term objective continued by his son Pawel, and grandson Marcin. Marcin, a trained agricultural engineer, unexpectedly decided to enter a seminary in 1937, leaving the estate to his younger brother Stanisław and his new bride Irena.

Stanisław, an infantry officer, was captured as a prisoner of war in 1940. While Irena and Marcin (now returned from the seminary) did their best to feed and clothe the numerous people who sought shelter in the basement of the castle. The area witnessed heavy fighting during the summer of 1944 as Soviet troops pushed back the Wehrmacht. At different times the Palace served as barracks, shelter and operating base for both armies. Irena, her two young boys and her mother-in-law fled in 1944 before the Soviets arrived, as landed aristocracy would not be treated well under the new Socialist order. The Popiels would not return to Kurozwęki until 1991.


http://img.interia.pl/turystyka/nimg...ow_5527824.jpg


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...%C4%99kach.jpg

Courtyard

http://www.kurozweki.com/files/galle...courtyard3.jpg


http://www.purtak.vel.pl/wp-content/...rozweki/05.jpg


http://wakacjezdzieciakiem.pl/image/...02221kuro5.jpg

Interiors

http://www.kurozweki.com/files/galle...courtyard2.jpg


http://www.kurozweki.com/files/galle...K/corridor.jpg


http://www.kurozweki.com/files/galle.../oranzeria.jpg


http://www.kurozweki.com/files/galle...K/ballroom.jpg


http://www.kurozweki.com/files/galle...ARK/chapel.jpg


http://www.kurozweki.com/files/galle...a_rycerska.jpg


http://www.kurozweki.com/files/galle..._rycerska2.jpg
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Old October 29th, 2013, 12:51 AM   #92
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Great pictures.
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Old October 29th, 2013, 06:03 AM   #93
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Renaissance castle - Sucha Beskidzka, Poland
Crown of the kingdom of Poland



This renaissance castle is often called “Little Wawel”

The galleried arcades of the castle, imitating the galleries of Wawel, were added in 1614 by Piotr Komorowski to the extant 16th century renaissance manor of Kasper Suski. The Wielopolski, Branicki, and Tarnowski families who were the subsequent owners of Sucha carried out alterations to the castle many times but always left the arcaded courtyard intact.

The residence was spared hostile army invasions and other disasters and today after a painstaking renovation it houses the Local Community Centre a hotel and restaurant . The historical building is surrounded by a park with a neo-gothic orangery and the Gardeners House in which is located the Regional Association of Sucha Beskidzka.


http://i1132.photobucket.com/albums/...9/DSC00497.jpg


http://imageshack.us/a/img145/1063/img8884o.jpg


http://www.strykowski.net/suchabeski...jecie_5021.jpg





http://www.malopolska24.pl/wp-conten..._kruzganki.jpg


http://krodo.pl/upload/places/place_...9502802958.jpg

Interiors

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_pPH4KncjRI...su_zamek_2.jpg

image hosted on flickr

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2457/...f7e8aa417b.jpg
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Old November 18th, 2013, 03:12 PM   #94
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Janowiec Castle - Janowiec, Poland
Crown of the Kingdom of Poland



One of the greatest castles in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth
This castle was first erected in the beginning of XVI century and extended to the XVIII century. It was home to the noble magnate families of Firlejów, Tarłów and Lubomirski.

The castle was redesigned in the XVII century and later reconstructed (after destruction by the Swedes in 1656) by some of the greatest archictects and sculptures of the time such as: Santi Gucci Fiorentino, Giovanni Battista Falconi and Tylman von Gameren.

The downfall of the castle begun after the Lubomirski family lost the castle due to a lost hazzard bet. The following owners were never able to maitain this gigantic structure and the castle fell shortly in the beginning of the 19th century in decline (ruins). Reconstruction of the castle begun after WWII and continues in stages to this day.


http://www.mmpulawy.pl/sites/igc3/fi...2_0.jpg?m6cgoo


http://winologia.pl/blog/janowiec4.jpg

Main entrance

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...le%2C_2009.JPG

Courtyard and ruins of the castle chapel

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi..._Castle_02.JPG

Courtyard

http://www.fotografix.com.pl/zamki/j...anowiec_05.jpg


http://www.lubelskie.pl/img/userfile...a/Muzea/10.JPG


http://static.panoramio.com/photos/large/9126301.jpg

How the castle looked before it fell into decline in the 19th century (and hopefully how it will appear again when the castle is fully reconstructed)

http://www.zamki.pl/xz/r_janowiec3.jpg


http://www.zamki.pl/xz/r_janowiec4.jpg
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Old November 18th, 2013, 11:46 PM   #95
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Krzyżtopór, Ujazd - Poland
Crown of the Kingdom of Poland



It is unknown when the construction of this impressive fortress began. Krzysztof Ossoliński’s father, Jan Zbigniew Ossoliński, gave him the village of Ujazd in 1619; however, first documented proof of the construction of the castle comes from 1627, when it was uncompleted. The nobleman probably finished it in 1644, having spent the enormous sum of 30 million Polish złotys on the work. Unfortunately, Ossoliński did not enjoy it for long, as he died suddenly the next year in Kraków.

Even though extensive research has been carried out through the years, historians have been unable to fully explain all aspects of the complex. No documents have been preserved that have enabled determination of the either the date of commencement of the castle’s construction or the date of its completion. The name of the architect is also unknown. Krzysztof Ossoliński was enamored with black magic; while the unique symmetry of the castle is evident even in its ruined state, the hidden meanings that may have been incorporated into virtually every part of the castle are not obvious.

The very name of the complex is a mysterious one. Krzysztof Ossoliński officially named it Krzysztofory, which is derived from Latin word Christophoros. Later, the name changed to Krzyżtopór, which is a compounding of two Polish words – krzyż ("cross", a symbol of the Catholic faith and Ossoliński’s policies) and topór ("axe", the charge from the family's coat of arms). Both symbols can be seen on the gate of the castle. Also, above the gate there is the date 1631, but to what this date refers has not been firmly established.

Reportedly, the castle once had 365 windows (as many as days of the year), 52 rooms (as many as weeks of the year), 12 ballrooms (as many as months of the year) and 4 towers (as many seasons of the year). For defensive purposes, the castle was erected upon a rocky hill, making it impossible for an enemy to organize an underground attack.

The castle was inherited by Ossoliński’s son Krzysztof Baldwin Ossoliński, who died in 1649 in the Battle of Zborów. After his death, the formidable complex was purchased by the family of the Denhoffs, then by the Kalinowskis.

In 1655, during the Swedish invasion of Poland, the castle was captured by the Swedes, who occupied it until 1657, pillaging the entire complex. The damage to the structure was so extensive that after the Swedes’ withdrawal it was not rebuilt, as it was deemed too costly. Several noble families (the Morsztyns, the Wiśniowieckis and the Pacs) lived in the best preserved, western wing, but the castle otherwise remained in ruins.

In 1770, during the Bar Confederation, Krzyżtopór, defended by the Confederate units, was seized by the Russians, who completed the building's ruin. Reportedly, last known inhabitant of the complex, Stanisław Sołtyk, lived there in the years 1782-1787, after which time Krzyżtopór has been deserted.
During the Second World War the complex was again ransacked. A partial remodeling took place in 1971, and in 1980 the Polish Ministry of Internal Affairs decided to rebuild it for use as a rest area for officers. This work was halted in 1981, when martial law was imposed in Poland.


http://images.photo.bikestats.eu/zdj...xvii-wieku.jpg

Current view (The most impressive I have seen of the castle)

http://filmyzpowietrza.pl/wp-content...3%B3r_skos.jpg

20??

http://images30.fotosik.pl/49/4128ed6b9bd2de52.jpg



In my opinion this castle must be reconstructed, and host the museum of the Polish-Lithuanian commonwealth

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-n3chuZ_zGO...0/Ujazd113.jpg


http://bi.gazeta.pl/im/5/11437/z1143...w--Krzyszt.jpg

Some of the roofed interiors

http://przewodnik.swietokrzyski.kuro...rzyztopor9.jpg


http://s3.flog.pl/media/foto/1538802_krzyztopor-2.jpg


http://s9.flog.pl/media/foto/sentry_...8f4a8cb513.jpg


http://zlotaproporcja.files.wordpres...13/11/3636.jpg


http://www.robertwroblewski.com/zdje...zyztopor11.jpg
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Old November 20th, 2013, 02:21 PM   #96
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The Eastern borderland fortresses - To moderator: New page please

Zbarazh (Zbaraż) castle and fortress - Ternopil Oblast, Ukraine
Crown of the Kingdom of Poland - Lesser Poland



Zbarazh Castle (Ukrainian: Збаразький замок) was a fortified defense stronghold. It dominates the crests of the Zamkova Hills of Ternopil Oblast in Western Ukraine next to the city's central plaza that was not in so distant past surrounded by marshland. The castle existence has been credited to last members of Zbaraski family undertaking of Krzysztof Zbaraski and Jerzy Zbaraski.

Evidence of the City of Zbarazh formation can be seen in the Ruthenia fortress dating back to 1211 that was positioned somewhat away from current castle. Today this is a village of Zbarazky District located in the immediate proximity of Zbarazh itself and called the Village of Stary Zbaraż. At that distant time the old castle and the province was ruled by Gediminids Landlords Zbaraski.

The Zbarazky landlords erected a primeval wooden fortress in the town which nowadays is called Stary Zbarazh (Old Zbarazh), a quarter mile away from their own mansion. Soon after it was incinerated during a skirmish with the tatars. All the fortification's protectors, including Vasyl Nesvizky, the grandson of Theodore Kaributas, were killed on the burning battleground. Another castle was constructed in the same location using the same materials, and its end was enacted in the same deadly way. It was set on fire during a nomadic attack in the year of 1589 while Yanush Zbarazky commanded the stronghold. Later in the beginning of the 17th century, his son decided to build a masonry structure in the new location receiving guidance from Western European architects.

The first blueprints were drafted by Vincenzo Scamozzi for Krzysztof Zbaraski, but the project did not gain approval: it would remain more a palace then a marshal bastion. Scamozzi had envision his creation at first and described it in the tractate named "The idea of universal architecture", which he later on partially embodied into stone in the city of Zbarazh. It appeared that this architect took "Utopia" of Thomas More too close to his heart. Therefore the contender won a different project by Hendrik van Peene, who was quite familiar with the landlords due to his previous work on Zbaraski's palace in Kraków.

An escarped bulwark emerged from the mounds of dirt up to 12 m (39 ft) high, and a terrace for the castle troopers was laid out of 23 m (75 ft) wide. A rectangular courtyard inside had been plotted. Behind the walls arched chambers were constructed, that nowadays house specimens of arms and wooden sculptures of Pinzel's students. An entrenchment around bulwark was very wide, in some parts it is as much as 40 m (131 ft). In the middle of the fortress, regarding rules of "palazzo in fortezza", was developed a palace in the architectural style of Renaissance with early Baroque elements.

First ruination of the new fortification was endeavored by cossacks in 1648. Polish sources reported their amount as much as 100,000 strong. But it would rather be an exaggeration. There was no business for such a ferocious army to siege a small castle. Nonetheless the landlords became determined increasing security of the military outpost. In the year of 1649 it was improved complying to a design of architect Dubois from Lorraine. During some period of time the stronghold was vacant, but later on its ownership was transferred to the Wiśniowiecki family.

In 1675 it was overcome and burned by Turks, and soon afterwards followed a restoration by Dimitry Wiśniowiecki. That was exactly a moment when castle was turned into a palace, losing its strategic military designation. Nevertheless it did not stop Russian soldiers plundering a building in the years of 1707 to 1734. Dmitry Wiśniowiecki having died in 1862, the architectural complex became a property of the Potocki family. These were Joseph and later on Stanislav, Mayor of Kiev. Zbarazh remained under the control of the Potoki family until the middle of the 19th century.

Having Ukrainian Independence been announced, the castle was included into a registry of national historical architectural heritage in the year of 1994. The complex has a rectangular footprint, and surrounded on all sides by some marshland. This fortification demonstrated most advanced achievements of European marshal fortpost defense craft that included an escarped bulwarks, four bastions, and a moat encircling the building perimeter.

Earlier, in the place of the palace, rectangular void was taken completely by the castles yard. The palace itself has two stories, being masonry built, with distinctive simplistic features of Renaissance era. The main entry way is emphasized by a balcony with a stone console. The outer corners of the palace are decorated with a field stone. Facades were risen in the Renaissance style as well. Gatehouse was aligned straightforward with the castle main entry. Pentagon bastions have been preserved partially. In everyone of them there are a tunnels connecting the castle yard and chambers.


http://www.encyclopediaofukraine.com...al%20view).jpg


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...stle_Park3.jpg


http://www.top.turystyka.pl/res/zdj/.../09-Zbaraz.jpg

Courtyard

http://s3.flog.pl/media/foto/3496318_zbaraz.jpg

Castle

http://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/med...azh-castle.jpg


http://castles.com.ua/uploads/pics/zbaraz_01.jpg

image hosted on flickr

http://farm2.staticflickr.com/1358/5...f392f741_z.jpg

Interiors

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...interior-2.jpg


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...interior-4.jpg


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...interior-5.jpg
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Old November 20th, 2013, 07:16 PM   #97
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The eastern borderland fortresses of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth

Kamyanets-Podilsky castle and fortress - Podolia, Ukraine
Disputed area between the Crown of the Kingdom of Poland and the Cossack Hetmanate

Kamianets-Podilskyi Castle (Ukrainian: Кам'янець-Подільська фортеця; Polish: twierdza w Kamieńcu Podolskim; Russian: Каменец-Подольская крепость; Turkish: Kamaniēe Kalesi) is a former Ruthenian-Lithuanian castle and a later three-part Polish fortress located in the historic city of Kamianets-Podilskyi, Ukraine, in the historic region of Podolia in the western part of the country. Its name is attributed to the root word kamin', from the Slavic word for stone.

Historical accounts date the Kamianets-Podilskyi Castle to the early 14th century, although recent archaeological evidence has proved human existence in the area back to the 12th or 13th century. Initially built to protect the bridge connecting the city with the mainland, the castle sits on top of a peninsula carved out by the winding Smotrych River, forming a natural defense system for Kamianets-Podilskyi's historic Old Town neighborhood.

Its location on a strategic transport crossroad in Podolia and made the castle a prime target for foreign invaders, who rebuilt the castle to suit their own needs, adding to its multicultural architectural diversity. Specifically, the complex consists of the Old Town fortified by King Casimir IV, the Old Castle rebuilt by Kings Sigismund I and Stephen Bįthory, and the New Castle founded by Kings Sigismund III and Władysław IV.

However, in spite of the many architectural and engineering changes to the original structure, the castle still forms a coherent architectural design, being one of the few medieval constructions in Ukraine that is relatively well preserved.

Along with the Old Town neighborhood, the castle is listed as part of the National Historical-Architectural Sanctuary "Kam'ianets" and the National Environmental Park "Podilski Tovtry". The complex is a candidate UNESCO World Heritage Site, nominated in 1989 by the Ukrainian representatives, and also one of the Seven Wonders of Ukraine.

Today, the Kamianets-Podilskyi Castle is the most recognized landmark of the city, serving as an important regional and national tourist attraction.


http://blog.noclegi.com.ua/wp-conten...Podolski-6.jpg


http://static.kresy.pl/image/gf/9299...8fac132b55.jpg


http://static.kresy.pl/image/gf/d054...49d6adeafc.jpg


http://mitrofan.geoblog.pl/gallery/5...5525dcb0eb.jpg


http://www.balloon.com.pl/images/img02_big.jpg
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Old November 20th, 2013, 07:54 PM   #98
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Ostrogski's Palace in Stare Sioło.

Stare Sioło (Ukrainian: Старе Село; translit. Stare Selo, literally "Old village", "Old settlement"). Approx. 20 km SE of Lwów (Lviv). Lviv Oblast, Pustomyty Raion. Site of large, now derelict, fortress of Władysław Dominik Ostrogski.

Enjoy









As you can see (dark blue car on the right), the fortress can be visited in mode "Drive Thru". Like in McDonald's
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Old November 21st, 2013, 04:55 PM   #99
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Khotyn (Chocim) castle and fortress - Chernivtsi Oblast, Ukraine

The Khotyn Fortress (Ukrainian: Хотинська фортеця, Polish: twierdza w Chocimiu, Turkish: Hotin Kalesi, Romanian: Cetatea Hotinului) is a fortification complex located on the right bank of the Dniester River in Khotyn, Chernivtsi Oblast (province) of western Ukraine. It is situated on a territory of the historical northern Bessarabia region which was split in 1940 between Ukraine and Moldova. The fortress is also located in a close proximity to another famous the Old Kam'yanets Castle of Kamianets-Podilskyi.

Construction on the current Khotyn fortress was started in 1325, while major improvements were made in the 1380s and in the 1460s.
The fortress is a large tourist attraction for the area and Ukraine. In 2007, the fortress was named one of the Seven Wonders of Ukraine. It is also a National Ukrainian Architectural Preserve as of 2000.

The Khotyn Fortress's beginning goes back to the Khotyn Fort, which was built in the 10th century by Prince Vladimir Sviatoslavich as one of the border fortifications of southwestern Kievan Rus', after he added the land of present-day Bukovina into his control. The fort, which eventually was rebuilt into a fortress, was located on important transportation routes, which connected Scandinavia and Kiev with the Ponyzia (lowlands), Podillia, Genoese and Greek colonies on the Black Sea, through Moldavia and Wallachia, on the famous "trade route from the Varangians to the Greeks".

The fortification was located on a rocky territory, created by the tall right hand shore of Dniester and the valley. At first it was just a huge mound of dirt with wooden walls and protective equipment. It was designed to protect the settlement of Khotyn across the river. The first stone construction was rather small. It was located exactly where the northern tower is located today. Throughout the centuries, this fortress underwent many reconstructions and expansions, and was damaged by new conquerors, who would later rebuild it.

At the end of the 11th century Khotyn fortress belonged to Terebovlia principality. During the 1140s the fortress became part of Halych Principality, and in 1199 was part of the Halych-Volhynian Kingdom.

In 1250-64, Prince Danylo of Halych and his son Lev, rebuilt the fortress. They added a half-meter (20 in) stone wall and a 6-meter (20 ft) wide moat around the fortress. In the northern part of the fortress, were added new military buildings as well. In the second half of the 13th century, it was rebuilt by the Genoese.

During the 1340s the Fortress was taken by Moldavian prince Dragos, a vassal of the Kingdom of Hungary. After 1375 it was a part of the Principality of Moldavia. Under the rule of Stephen the Great of Moldavia the fortress was greatly expanded. Under his leadership, new 5–6-meter (16–20 ft) wide and 40 meters (130 ft) high walls were built. He also added three towers and raised the courtyard by 10 meters (33 ft). The courtyard was divided into princes' and soldiers' halves. He also dug deep basements which served as barracks to soldiers. This reconstruction brought the fortress to the structure it has today. During 14th-16th centuries the Fortress served as a residence to Moldavian Princes.

In 1476, the garrison successfully held the Fortress against the Turkish army of Sultan Mehmed II. By the end of the 16th century Moldavia became a tributary principality of the Ottoman Empire. Thereafter, a janissary unit was stationed inside the fortress, alongside the Moldavian troops. During this time the Turks expanded and fortified the Fortress.

The Fortress was captured by the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth forces under the leadership of Great Crown Hetman Jan Tarnowski in 1538. Commonwealth forces undermined the walls of the Fortress, destroyed three towers and part of the western wall. After it was captured, the Khotyn Citadel was renovated between 1540-1544. In 1563 Dmytro Vyshnevetsky with five hundred Zaporozhian Cossacks captured the Fortress and held it for a time.

In 1600 father of Petru Movilă, Simion, previous ruler of both Moldavia and Wallachia, and his brother Prince of Moldavia Ieremia Movilă, with Polish support, took refuge in the Fortress. They fought a dynastic battle against the forces of Moldavia and Wallachia led by Michael the Brave, who was trying to capture it, then took refuge to Poland.
In 1615 the Polish army again captured Khotyn, and in 1620 the city was captured back by the Turkish army.

In September–October 1621, the Commonwealth army under command of hetman Jan Karol Chodkiewicz and Petro Sahaidachny, Yatsko Borodavka (about 50,000 troops) successfully held off the army of Turkish sultan, Osman II (estimated at 100,000), in the Battle of Khotyn. On October 8, 1621 the Khotyn Peace Treaty was signed, stopping the Ottoman advance into the Commonwealth and confirming the Commonwealth-Ottoman border on the Dniester river (the border of the Principality of Moldavia).

Bohdan Khmelnytsky, came first as an ally of Principalities of Moldavia and Wallachia, then occupied the Khotyn Fortress for a period of time in the spring of 1650. In 1653, in the Zhvanets Battle on the left bank of Dniester, a garrison of Turks from Khotyn were fighting in the battle along with the forces of the Principality of Moldavia. In November 1673, the Khotyn Fortress was lost by the Turks and Jan Sobieski started to occupy Khotyn with a Polish-Cossack army. Jan Sobieski is known to have described the battle as "More than 60 guns were thundering non-stop, the sky was in flames and smothered in smoke, the earth was quaking, the walls were groaning, the rocks were splitting into pieces. That which my eyes captured throughout the day was indescribable. It is impossible to convey the persistence and courage, or rather despair, with which both parties were fighting".
With the 1699 Karlowitz Peace Treaty, the fortress was transferred from the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth to Moldavia.

In 1711, Khotyn was again taken over by the Turks. The Turks then fortified Khotyn following a six-year (1712–18) reconstruction and it became the foremost stronghold of the Ottoman defense in Eastern Europe.

In 1739, after the Russians defeated the Turks in the Battle of Stavuchany (today Stavceane) in which Ukrainians, Russians, Georgians, and Moldavians fought, they laid siege on the Khotyn fortress. The commander of the Turkish forces, Iliaş Colceag surrendered the fortress to the Russian commander Burkhard Christoph von Münnich.

In 1769 and 1788, the Russians again successfully stormed the fortress, but every time it was given back according to peace treaties. Only after the Russo-Turkish War (1806-1812) did Khotyn become a permanent part of Russia and a district center in Bessarabia. However, when the Turks were retreating, they almost completely ruined the fortress.


http://blog.noclegi.com.ua/wp-conten...02/Chocim.jpeg


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...ortress._1.jpg


http://bukovyna.ucoz.com/Sights_Tour...N/IMG_0148.jpg


http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Vm0kBYaDK6...0/DSC_0592.JPG


http://ukrainetrek.com/blog/wp-conte...-ukraine-2.jpg

Battle of Chocim - 1673 (The great victory which paved the way to the throne for Jan III Sobieski)


http://www.pinakoteka.zascianek.pl/S..._Chocimiem.jpg
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Old November 21st, 2013, 06:33 PM   #100
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oslo2022 View Post

Khotyn (Chocim) castle and fortress - Chernivtsi Oblast, Ukraine

The Khotyn Fortress (Ukrainian: Хотинська фортеця, Polish: twierdza w Chocimiu, Turkish: Hotin Kalesi, Romanian: Cetatea Hotinului) is a fortification complex located on the right bank of the Dniester River in Khotyn, Chernivtsi Oblast (province) of western Ukraine.
More pics:
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...3&postcount=10
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=242

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oslo2022 View Post

In 1250-64, Prince Danylo of Halych and his son Lev, rebuilt the fortress. They added a half-meter (20 in) stone wall and a 6-meter (20 ft) wide moat around the fortress. In the northern part of the fortress, were added new military buildings as well.
Danylo Halytskyi (Danylo of Halych) became king in 1253. He was a King of Ruthenia (Ukraine) in 1253-1264.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oslo2022 View Post

In September–October 1621, the Commonwealth army under command of hetman Jan Karol Chodkiewicz and Petro Sahaidachny, Yatsko Borodavka (about 50,000 troops) successfully held off the army of Turkish sultan, Osman II (estimated at 100,000), in the Battle of Khotyn.
In 1621 Ukrainians and Poles saved Europe from the Ottoman Empire armies --> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Khotyn_(1621)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oslo2022 View Post

Kamyanets-Podilsky castle and fortress - Podolia, Ukraine

http://alexdarkside.35photo.ru/photo_446926/

More pics: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...1&postcount=67
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