daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Subways and Urban Transport

Subways and Urban Transport Metros, subways, light rail, trams, buses and other local transport systems



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old November 5th, 2005, 07:12 PM   #281
magestom
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,972
Likes (Received): 17

The red buses are the Mumbai ones.
magestom no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old November 5th, 2005, 10:44 PM   #282
Bertez
Registered User
 
Bertez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Sauga
Posts: 2,203
Likes (Received): 6

Nice
Bertez no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2005, 06:08 AM   #283
centralized pandemonium
Satyameva Jayate
 
centralized pandemonium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Can-duh-a
Posts: 2,856
Likes (Received): 13

__________________
Give a man a fish and he eats for a day. Teach a man to fish and he gets drunk and sunburned every weekend.

www.ironaddicts.com
centralized pandemonium no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2005, 06:11 AM   #284
Totu
Registered User
 
Totu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Buenos Aires
Posts: 5,385
Likes (Received): 4637

Great Buses. They are similar to the new buses you can see in Buenos Aires!!

I loved the ornamentation of the first photo.

Totu, from Buenos Aires
Totu no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2005, 06:44 AM   #285
spyguy
Expert
 
spyguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 6,916
Likes (Received): 97

Crazy paint jobs. Won't get run over by that bus
spyguy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2005, 08:33 AM   #286
hkth
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 2,404
Likes (Received): 25

Great news for India to enter the Low-floor buses family!
hkth no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2005, 08:47 AM   #287
malek
www.mtlurb.com
 
malek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Montréal
Posts: 2,159
Likes (Received): 79

we have the same low floor buses for about 10 years now, i absolutely hate them.

malek no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 11th, 2005, 07:58 AM   #288
Bikaner
Bikaner
 
Bikaner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Bikaner
Posts: 66
Likes (Received): 0

Excellent buses. Great for New Delhi and Mumbai!
Bikaner no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 11th, 2005, 09:15 PM   #289
centralized pandemonium
Satyameva Jayate
 
centralized pandemonium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Can-duh-a
Posts: 2,856
Likes (Received): 13

Now Delhi Metro to Faridabad and Bahadurgarh?

Though still some time away from making a foray into any of the satellite townships around the Capital, the Delhi Metro is now engaged in studies to plan its entry into Faridabad and Bahadurgarh in Haryana.

Preparation of detailed project reports for a new 10-km corridor from Mundka in West Delhi to Bahadurgarh and of a 15-km corridor from Okhla in South Delhi to Faridabad is under way. These two new lines, as and when constructed, would provide a big relief to people travelling to and fro these satellite townships.

With these two new links - the detailed project reports for which are scheduled to be completed within six months -- the total number of planned Delhi Metro corridors to Haryana would go up to three. Already a corridor has been planned for Gurgaon. The project report for this stretch had recommended construction of a line from Qutub Minar in Delhi to IFFCO Chowk in Gurgaon via Ambedkar Nagar, Andheria Bagh, Sultanpur, Ghitorni, Arjan Garh, Nathpur, Sikandarpur and DT cinema.

The two proposed new corridors are considered significant as they would primarily be extensions of the corridors under the Master Plan for the Delhi Mass Rapid Transport System. The Mundka-Bahadurgarh corridor is expected to be taken up in Phase III of the project once the 15-km line from Kirti Nagar to Mundka is completed in Phase II of the project. Work on the Kirti Nagar-Mundka line, which had been approved of by the Union Cabinet this past August, has already started in right earnest. The line consists of six corridors, covering a total length of 53.51 km, which would be undertaken in Phase II of the project.

As for the Okhla-Faridabad line, it would be an extension of the proposed line from Jahangirpuri to Rajouri Garden to AIIMS to Okhla Phase I that has been envisaged in Phase III of the project. The 15-km corridor from Okhla to Faridabad would provide an important link to the industrial township south of Delhi that had thus far been lagging behind due to poor connectivity from the Capital.


With the two new detailed project reports, Haryana has also stolen a march over Uttar Pradesh in Metro connectivity. Though DPRs for a link to Noida Sector 32 from New Ashok Nagar in East Delhi and to Loha Mandi in Ghaziabad from Dilshad Garden in North East Delhi have been prepared, U.P. has still not moved forward with the construction plans. On the other hand, Haryana is showing increasing interest in having Delhi's Metro system fuel its engine of growth.
__________________
Give a man a fish and he eats for a day. Teach a man to fish and he gets drunk and sunburned every weekend.

www.ironaddicts.com
centralized pandemonium no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 25th, 2005, 12:02 PM   #290
ROLFSTER
BANNED
 
ROLFSTER's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 84
Likes (Received): 0

Delhi Metro

Delhi Metro Rail is preparing to open its longest metro line, extending the Indian capital's three-year-old network by 70 percent as cities across the country weigh the benefits of building their own mass transport systems.

The opening in December of the 22.8-kilometer, or 14-mile, line will connect commuters in the densely populated western suburbs with Connaught Place and Karol Bagh market in the center, doubling ticket sales for a network that carries just 275,000 passengers a day in a city of 13.8 million people.

Delhi Metro may become a model for cities like Bangalore and Mumbai, where the company has been hired as an adviser. The government this week promised to spend 1 trillion rupees, or about $21.9 billion, over seven years to overhaul dilapidated ports, roads and railways in 60 cities.

"We've ignored investing in our urban infrastructure for far too long," said S.K. Nair, an adviser at the National Council of Applied Economic Research, a privately owned research group in New Delhi. "City infrastructure needs a thorough overhaul and the Delhi Metro is a step in that direction."

Modeled on MTR Corp.'s system in Hong Kong, a third of Delhi Metro's 33-kilometer network runs underground. India's central government and the state of Delhi, the co-owners of Delhi Metro, aim to invest 180 billion rupees by 2010 to extend the network to 115.4 kilometers.

Financed with loans from the Japan Bank for International Cooperation, Delhi Metro uses ticket machines made by Thales and signaling equipment made by Alstom, both of which are French companies. The train coaches are made by Rotem, an affiliate of Hyundai Motor of South Korea.

Delhi Metro's fares range from 6 rupees to 14 rupees depending on how far a passenger travels on the 59-station network. The company is leasing station space to cinema operators, fast-food companies and automakers like Maruti Udyog, which has set up car showrooms, Delhi Metro's managing director, E. Sreedharan, said.

"We earn only about 7 percent from leasing and other activities today, but we need to do much more," Sreedharan said in an interview Tuesday. "That will subsidize the ticket fares."

The success of Delhi Metro may pave the way for similar networks in other Indian cities, creating new markets for Alstom, Rotem, Bombardier, Siemens, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and other manufacturers of railway equipment.

Delhi Metro is a consultant to seven of the 29 Indian states that want to build similar rail networks.

Bangalore and Hyderabad, where Infosys Technologies and India's largest computer software companies are based, are considering building their own metro systems. Mumbai, which has India's largest city-rail system, may also build an air-conditioned metro similar to that in New Delhi.

"I hope our success will spur others," Sreedharan said. "We have to support the urbanization of India by bringing in mass rapid transport systems in a big way in all our cities."

Still, convincing people to use a metro in a city with the nation's second-highest number of registered vehicles may be difficult, analysts said.

"Metro rail transport is not suited for a city like New Delhi, with highly dispersed business areas and lack of high-rise" apartment buildings, said Dinesh Mohan, transport research coordinator at the Indian Institute of Technology.

Delhi Metro's network is designed to carry 2.2 million people a day by 2010, about 16 percent of the city's population, or one in five commuters.

SMRT and SBS Transit, which operate Singapore's 128-kilometer metro network, carried 1.34 million people a day last year, or a third of the population.

As many as 2.4 million commuters, or a third of Hong Kong's population, use MTR's 26-year-old subway network each day. Taipei's mass rapid transit system, which started in 2000, moves one million people daily in a city of 2.6 million people. The network was set up with an investment of $13.1 billion.

India should invest in buses on dedicated lanes instead, because "they are able to catch people in a wider area and offer door-to-door service," Mohan said.

Delhi Metro plans to introduce feeder buses to carry passengers to its railway stations in an effort to attract more riders, Sreedharan said.

NEW DELHI Delhi Metro Rail is preparing to open its longest metro line, extending the Indian capital's three-year-old network by 70 percent as cities across the country weigh the benefits of building their own mass transport systems.

The opening in December of the 22.8-kilometer, or 14-mile, line will connect commuters in the densely populated western suburbs with Connaught Place and Karol Bagh market in the center, doubling ticket sales for a network that carries just 275,000 passengers a day in a city of 13.8 million people.

Delhi Metro may become a model for cities like Bangalore and Mumbai, where the company has been hired as an adviser. The government this week promised to spend 1 trillion rupees, or about $21.9 billion, over seven years to overhaul dilapidated ports, roads and railways in 60 cities.

"We've ignored investing in our urban infrastructure for far too long," said S.K. Nair, an adviser at the National Council of Applied Economic Research, a privately owned research group in New Delhi. "City infrastructure needs a thorough overhaul and the Delhi Metro is a step in that direction."

Modeled on MTR Corp.'s system in Hong Kong, a third of Delhi Metro's 33-kilometer network runs underground. India's central government and the state of Delhi, the co-owners of Delhi Metro, aim to invest 180 billion rupees by 2010 to extend the network to 115.4 kilometers.

Financed with loans from the Japan Bank for International Cooperation, Delhi Metro uses ticket machines made by Thales and signaling equipment made by Alstom, both of which are French companies. The train coaches are made by Rotem, an affiliate of Hyundai Motor of South Korea.

Delhi Metro's fares range from 6 rupees to 14 rupees depending on how far a passenger travels on the 59-station network. The company is leasing station space to cinema operators, fast-food companies and automakers like Maruti Udyog, which has set up car showrooms, Delhi Metro's managing director, E. Sreedharan, said.

"We earn only about 7 percent from leasing and other activities today, but we need to do much more," Sreedharan said in an interview Tuesday. "That will subsidize the ticket fares."

The success of Delhi Metro may pave the way for similar networks in other Indian cities, creating new markets for Alstom, Rotem, Bombardier, Siemens, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and other manufacturers of railway equipment.

Delhi Metro is a consultant to seven of the 29 Indian states that want to build similar rail networks.

Bangalore and Hyderabad, where Infosys Technologies and India's largest computer software companies are based, are considering building their own metro systems. Mumbai, which has India's largest city-rail system, may also build an air-conditioned metro similar to that in New Delhi.

"I hope our success will spur others," Sreedharan said. "We have to support the urbanization of India by bringing in mass rapid transport systems in a big way in all our cities."

Still, convincing people to use a metro in a city with the nation's second-highest number of registered vehicles may be difficult, analysts said.

"Metro rail transport is not suited for a city like New Delhi, with highly dispersed business areas and lack of high-rise" apartment buildings, said Dinesh Mohan, transport research coordinator at the Indian Institute of Technology.

Delhi Metro's network is designed to carry 2.2 million people a day by 2010, about 16 percent of the city's population, or one in five commuters.

SMRT and SBS Transit, which operate Singapore's 128-kilometer metro network, carried 1.34 million people a day last year, or a third of the population.

As many as 2.4 million commuters, or a third of Hong Kong's population, use MTR's 26-year-old subway network each day. Taipei's mass rapid transit system, which started in 2000, moves one million people daily in a city of 2.6 million people. The network was set up with an investment of $13.1 billion.

India should invest in buses on dedicated lanes instead, because "they are able to catch people in a wider area and offer door-to-door service," Mohan said.

Delhi Metro plans to introduce feeder buses to carry passengers to its railway stations in an effort to attract more riders, Sreedharan said.

NEW DELHI Delhi Metro Rail is preparing to open its longest metro line, extending the Indian capital's three-year-old network by 70 percent as cities across the country weigh the benefits of building their own mass transport systems.

The opening in December of the 22.8-kilometer, or 14-mile, line will connect commuters in the densely populated western suburbs with Connaught Place and Karol Bagh market in the center, doubling ticket sales for a network that carries just 275,000 passengers a day in a city of 13.8 million people.

Delhi Metro may become a model for cities like Bangalore and Mumbai, where the company has been hired as an adviser. The government this week promised to spend 1 trillion rupees, or about $21.9 billion, over seven years to overhaul dilapidated ports, roads and railways in 60 cities.

"We've ignored investing in our urban infrastructure for far too long," said S.K. Nair, an adviser at the National Council of Applied Economic Research, a privately owned research group in New Delhi. "City infrastructure needs a thorough overhaul and the Delhi Metro is a step in that direction."

Modeled on MTR Corp.'s system in Hong Kong, a third of Delhi Metro's 33-kilometer network runs underground. India's central government and the state of Delhi, the co-owners of Delhi Metro, aim to invest 180 billion rupees by 2010 to extend the network to 115.4 kilometers.

Financed with loans from the Japan Bank for International Cooperation, Delhi Metro uses ticket machines made by Thales and signaling equipment made by Alstom, both of which are French companies. The train coaches are made by Rotem, an affiliate of Hyundai Motor of South Korea.

Delhi Metro's fares range from 6 rupees to 14 rupees depending on how far a passenger travels on the 59-station network. The company is leasing station space to cinema operators, fast-food companies and automakers like Maruti Udyog, which has set up car showrooms, Delhi Metro's managing director, E. Sreedharan, said.

"We earn only about 7 percent from leasing and other activities today, but we need to do much more," Sreedharan said in an interview Tuesday. "That will subsidize the ticket fares."

The success of Delhi Metro may pave the way for similar networks in other Indian cities, creating new markets for Alstom, Rotem, Bombardier, Siemens, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and other manufacturers of railway equipment.

Delhi Metro is a consultant to seven of the 29 Indian states that want to build similar rail networks.

Bangalore and Hyderabad, where Infosys Technologies and India's largest computer software companies are based, are considering building their own metro systems. Mumbai, which has India's largest city-rail system, may also build an air-conditioned metro similar to that in New Delhi.

"I hope our success will spur others," Sreedharan said. "We have to support the urbanization of India by bringing in mass rapid transport systems in a big way in all our cities."

Still, convincing people to use a metro in a city with the nation's second-highest number of registered vehicles may be difficult, analysts said.

"Metro rail transport is not suited for a city like New Delhi, with highly dispersed business areas and lack of high-rise" apartment buildings, said Dinesh Mohan, transport research coordinator at the Indian Institute of Technology.

Delhi Metro's network is designed to carry 2.2 million people a day by 2010, about 16 percent of the city's population, or one in five commuters.

SMRT and SBS Transit, which operate Singapore's 128-kilometer metro network, carried 1.34 million people a day last year, or a third of the population.

As many as 2.4 million commuters, or a third of Hong Kong's population, use MTR's 26-year-old subway network each day. Taipei's mass rapid transit system, which started in 2000, moves one million people daily in a city of 2.6 million people. The network was set up with an investment of $13.1 billion.

India should invest in buses on dedicated lanes instead, because "they are able to catch people in a wider area and offer door-to-door service," Mohan said.

Delhi Metro plans to introduce feeder buses to carry passengers to its railway stations in an effort to attract more riders, Sreedharan said.
ROLFSTER no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 25th, 2005, 01:49 PM   #291
Heilig
How about a magic trick?
 
Heilig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Airstrip One
Posts: 4,698

Soo I see that it will have a big, big, big demand between Kashmere Gate and Rajiv Chowk. There is no alternatives between N and S zones.
__________________
“If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.”

Carl Sagan
Heilig no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 25th, 2005, 02:54 PM   #292
Paulo2004
Luso from Aveiro
 
Paulo2004's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Lusitania
Posts: 4,656
Likes (Received): 57

Nice!
__________________
Murtosa em Fotos

For the best photos or information on Portugal, visit the PORTUGUESE FORUM.
Paulo2004 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 9th, 2005, 05:32 PM   #293
centralized pandemonium
Satyameva Jayate
 
centralized pandemonium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Can-duh-a
Posts: 2,856
Likes (Received): 13

New Metro line all ready and waiting for green signal
__________________
Give a man a fish and he eats for a day. Teach a man to fish and he gets drunk and sunburned every weekend.

www.ironaddicts.com
centralized pandemonium no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 2nd, 2006, 08:35 AM   #294
Naga_Solidus
Registered User
 
Naga_Solidus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,620
Likes (Received): 3

Delhi gets new Metro line in record time

Quote:
NEW DELHI: The long wait of lakhs of people in the Capital for a fast, comfortable and safe ride through some of the most congested areas of the city ended on Friday with Prime Minister Manmohan Singh inaugurating the new 22.79-km Barakhamba-Dwarka section of Delhi Metro Line III. The opening also marked dedication of Phase I of the project that now covers 56 km and has been completed in just seven years and three months as against the sanctioned 10 years.
IMAGES:





Total length of they system as of Jan. 2 2006, according to UrbanRail.Net: 56km over 50 stations.
__________________
Dude where's my car?

Last edited by Naga_Solidus; January 2nd, 2006 at 08:40 AM.
Naga_Solidus no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 22nd, 2006, 06:26 PM   #295
kronik
Registered User
 
kronik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: DED, PHL, MUM
Posts: 4,411
Likes (Received): 26

Good news on the Indian urban transportation front.

4 cities are set to begin constructing their own Metro systems by next year. The Delhi Metro Rail Corporation has finished the preliminary studies and construction will start soon.

Another city, Ahmedabad, is set to implement a brand new Bus Rapid Transport System as well.

Meanwhile, Delhi Metro continues to march forward. Now they are planning to run two new lines to the New Delhi International Airport. On a positive note, 80% of Delhi residents feel their city will be well prepared to host the 2010 Commonwealth games.

heres some news items to fill you all in.

Delhi to have a Metro station every 500 meters by 2020: Sreedharan

Quote:
Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) chief E.Sreedharan said on Wednesday that his mission was to see the Delhi Metro d covering 400 kms of Delhi, with a Metro station within 500 meters of residence of each citizen by 2020.

Speaking at a CII-organised felicitation ceremony here, Sreedharan said the upgrading of Delhi's railway network, including the ring railway, and expanding the role of IRBT, and cleaning of the Yamuna are his other wishes for Delhi.

An on - the spot poll revealed that 75 percent audience thought that Delhi's best feature is its improved Metro and flyovers; almost 80 percent said that more than infrastructure, the law and order and discipline needed to be improved for a meaningful brand of Delhi and almost unanimously, people said that they thought that Delhi would be well prepared to host the Commonwealth Games in 2010!
----------------------------------------------------------------

Metro power for India

Quote:
The metro rail is set to become a reality for the residents of Mumbai, Hyderabad, Kochi and Bangalore, with construction on the modern transport system in these cities set to start in 2006-07.

"Delhi metro has completed survey in these cities and construction will start in the coming financial year," said Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) managing director E Sreedharan.

Meanwhile, on the performance of Delhi metro, he said the rail system in the capital that was earning operational profits and would be able to not only meet its expenditure but also pay back its loans.
---------------------------------------------------------------

and this is the news about the Bus Rapid Transport System in the city of Ahmedabad.

Target ’07: BRTS race is revved up

Quote:
Come March 2007, and the megapolis will be able to boast of a Bus Rapid Transit System (BRTS) of its own. The route, covering nearly 155 km and connecting almost every area, will have passenger-friendly buses running on dedicated corridors and will provide Amdavadis with a convenient and much-needed transport system.

The Centre for Environment Planning and Technology (CEPT) has already designed a 48-km stretch (to be constructed at the cost of Rs 357 crore) dedicated to the BRTS, including 100 specially-designed BRTS buses and two flyovers on the way.

‘‘Design of the new passenger-friendly buses for these dedicated corridors has not been finalised yet but these buses will have basic facilities like low floors so that senior citizens, children and handicapped persons can board these buses easily...inside the bus, there will be wider space for easy movement.’’ Around 110 new bus shelters would also come up on the specially designed dedicated corridors, informed Mayor Amit Shah and committee chairperson Madhuben Patel after the meeting.

BRTS is part of Integrated Public Transit System (IPTS) which includes providing traffic solutions to be implemented jointly by Gujarat Infrastructure Development Board, the State Government, AMC and Ahmedabad Urban Development Authority (AUDA).
kronik no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 22nd, 2006, 06:45 PM   #296
kronik
Registered User
 
kronik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: DED, PHL, MUM
Posts: 4,411
Likes (Received): 26

some Delhi Metro images from recent past....



The Prime Minister of India purchasing a ticket after inaugurating a 22.8, 22 station line from Barakhamba Road to Dwarka.


The Japanese Foreign Minister riding the Metro on his trip here. With him is the MD, E. Sreedharan. The JBIC has also expressed interest in funding the Bangalore Metro and possibly the expansion of the Kolkata Metro.


The Prime Minister of Finland checked out the Delhi Metro earlier this month

and this is probably the sweetest Delhi picture, with the metro going into what appears to be skyline!!

kronik no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 23rd, 2006, 08:45 AM   #297
Tintin27
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 485
Likes (Received): 56

Delhi metro Airport routes

THE Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) has decided to have three separate corridors to drive the Metro into the Delhi airport. While DMRC had earlier proposed a high-speed dedicated corridor from New Delhi via South Delhi, the second link was planned from Dwarka Sector 22. The latest link added to these is from Dwarka Sector 9 where Metro line 3 (Barakhamba-Dwarka) will reach by this month end.

“We have decided to take the Metro directly from Dwarka Sector 9 to the airport. This route will not go via Sector 22. Work on this link will be carried out on priority basis. The 3-km link from Sector 22 will be a separate corridor to the airport. The third link will be a high-speed corridor from New Delhi via Connaught Place. The trains on this route will be equipped with luggage coaches,” said C.B.K. Rao, Director Projects and Planning, DMRC.
Tintin27 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 23rd, 2006, 10:15 PM   #298
MumbaiMustBTaller
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Mumbai
Posts: 16
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr.VitO
nice looking metro, hope mumbai can do the same.

mumbai can't do the same...Mumbai's terrain is saturated with water (remember, it used to be 7 island, then combined to one?), making underground systems impossible. What Mumbai can do is make over-ground rapid transit.
MumbaiMustBTaller no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 24th, 2006, 12:36 AM   #299
Bertez
Registered User
 
Bertez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Sauga
Posts: 2,203
Likes (Received): 6

I love those signs!!
__________________
........
Bertez no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 3rd, 2006, 05:34 PM   #300
cnc_square
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1
Likes (Received): 0

India Urban Transportation Review - March 2006

India Urban Transportation Review, March 2006
Vol. I No. 3 can be found at
http://www.iuts.org

Ashish
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/delhimetro
cnc_square no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
delhi, delhi metro, kolkata, tram

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 01:47 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium