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Old January 30th, 2017, 05:14 PM   #341
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The vast majority of reconstruction supporters in Germany are 35 and under.( I am 35 ) Several studies show the biggest fans with 85% support are 18 Years old. The reason for the party is this "kind" of old is simple:
Young people do not have the money for buying here, therefore little involvement. Second, the event took place during work and school hours during week. Younger people are at work or and have little children.
This is, at least to me, amazing and heartening. What has motivated 18 year olds to be interested in the rebuilding missions?
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Old January 30th, 2017, 06:22 PM   #342
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This is, at least to me, amazing and heartening. What has motivated 18 year olds to be interested in the rebuilding missions?
Maybe its the influence of Harry Potter and other similar films where the fictional architecture often resembles the old styles in Germany.
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Old January 30th, 2017, 08:22 PM   #343
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I'd suspect it's thanks to the internet. The web generation (now 40 or younger) knows how to google and they look up their cities. They'll see dozens of pictures of the old cityscapes throughout Germany, also thanks to the SSC and Stadtbild community sharing their knowledge with Wikipedia. We now also have various 3D models of gone cityscapes. Just a generation before, only architecture and history nerds (like us) knew about what was gone at large.

Also it's much easier to campaign for reconstructions these days with help of the web and more recent large projects like the Frauenkirche, Potsdam and Berlin City palaces, Dom-Römer Frankfurt, etc.
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Old January 30th, 2017, 09:34 PM   #344
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I'd suspect it's thanks to the internet. The web generation (now 40 or younger) knows how to google and they look up their cities. They'll see dozens of pictures of the old cityscapes throughout Germany, also thanks to the SSC and Stadtbild community sharing their knowledge with Wikipedia. We now also have various 3D models of gone cityscapes. Just a generation before, only architecture and history nerds (like us) knew about what was gone at large.

Also it's much easier to campaign for reconstructions these days with help of the web and more recent large projects like the Frauenkirche, Potsdam and Berlin City palaces, Dom-Römer Frankfurt, etc.
Well, I'm fairly young, and you all know how much I love reconstructions around Europe and the world. Also, my friends that aren't interested in architecture don't have anything particular against reconstructions, they don't view it as kitsch or anything like that. I would say that most people just don't care that much about architecture in general, they'll notice it only when it's something to be loved or hated. Historical architecture is generally better received than modern stuff (my sister says she likes Skopje 2014, I haven't talked to her since that day ), so that's probably an important factor when it comes to support of reconstruction, especially in severely destroyed cities.

Unfortunately, I think that reconstruction is still connected to political conservatism (backlash against Garnisonkirche), a factor that is maybe turning some young, progressive people away, so I hope that will change, as I myself (even though I may be a young progressive) only see reconstruction as a way to promote art, culture and uniqueness of a particular region or a country. Architecture should be independent of politics.
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Old January 31st, 2017, 12:07 AM   #345
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I find one thing quite fascinating. Romerberg, as it was reconstructed in the post-war era and as it stands today, is, in my opinion, one of the most beautiful and picturesque town squares in Europe (mainly due to Romer and the half-timbered buildings on the East side, of course). One can only imagine how beautiful Frankfurt must have been, given how lovely this partially reconstructed square looks nowadays.

Speaking of which, are there any other reconstruction plans for the old town in the city? Looking at Romerberg now and at how it looked like before the war, I feel that it would not be too much of a pain to torn down the modernist stuff in the square and rebuild masterpieces such as Haus Lichtenstein, Haus Frauenstein or Salzhaus...
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Old January 31st, 2017, 09:59 AM   #346
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^ Well, regarding the timbered old town houses, of which Frankfurt had around 2.000 until 1944/45 - only a single one survived the aerial/fire bombings of the US/UK without greater damage. It's Haus Werheym.
That's quite shocking. However, in the Trümmermodell there are several facades still standing. Were those saved?
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Old February 1st, 2017, 06:09 PM   #347
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I find one thing quite fascinating. Romerberg, as it was reconstructed in the post-war era and as it stands today, is, in my opinion, one of the most beautiful and picturesque town squares in Europe (mainly due to Romer and the half-timbered buildings on the East side, of course). One can only imagine how beautiful Frankfurt must have been, given how lovely this partially reconstructed square looks nowadays.

Speaking of which, are there any other reconstruction plans for the old town in the city? Looking at Romerberg now and at how it looked like before the war, I feel that it would not be too much of a pain to torn down the modernist stuff in the square and rebuild masterpieces such as Haus Lichtenstein, Haus Frauenstein or Salzhaus...
I would say its likely some time in the future. This altstadt reconstruction WILL be well received by the public when its completed, as the average person simply loves old styles of architecture far more than modern architecture. I think a lot of people will realise this after this project is complete and further reconstruction would receive a lot of support very easily
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Old February 1st, 2017, 11:20 PM   #348
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That's quite shocking. However, in the Trümmermodell there are several facades still standing. Were those saved?
Not sure if the ones you are seeing were saved, but "facades still standing" did not mean undamaged and unable to be used. The structural damage from heat and explosion concussions may have left some building aspects unpulverized, but they were generally too structurally unsound to be saved or used.
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Old February 2nd, 2017, 12:28 PM   #349
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One should not forget that the Trümmermodell is exaggerating a bit, as it was used as an excuse by politicians for not reconstructing more parts of the old town. Some of the facades that survived and can be seen in the model were torn down, while others are still standing today or have been reconstructed. The old town and some parts of the urban quarters surrounding it, was Frankfurt's heaviest loss in WWII. Outside the old town many timber framed buildings survived (especially in Höchst, Sachsenhausen and the former villages that have been independent before the 19th century), even in some parts of the Neustadt (today officially called 'Innenstadt') you can still see some timber framed buildings in some streets near Konstablerwache or Goetheplatz. The oldest timber framed building of the city also survived, it's Schellgasse 8 in Sachsenhausen dating back to the 13th century.
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Old February 6th, 2017, 11:00 AM   #350
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Interesting. Can you give any examples of buildings that survived?
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Old February 6th, 2017, 09:23 PM   #351
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I found another picture of the old "old town":


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Old February 6th, 2017, 11:22 PM   #352
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These aerial views illustrate pretty well just how much was lost during the war...I believe there is another one out there on the internet, similar to this view, but from a slightly different angle.

By the way, does anyone know where I could find more pictures from the Virtual Model of the Altstadt that was made some years ago? The website of the project does not work anymore, and I was only able to find a few pictures on Wikipedia.
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Old February 6th, 2017, 11:24 PM   #353
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Simply a World Heritage Site ...
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Frankfurt - Germany's ultimate skyline
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Old February 7th, 2017, 12:05 AM   #354
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^That's right, I feel that Frankfurt would have deserved a UNESCO World Heritage site designation had it survived the war...In fact this is quite an interesting question to ask, in a different thread, of course: which German cities lost during WW2 might have become World Heritage cities.
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Old February 7th, 2017, 03:35 PM   #355
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Definitely Dresden and Nuremberg, among others. Maybe even Munich.
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Old February 7th, 2017, 04:08 PM   #356
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Frankfurt's old town would have been a safe bet for World Heritage, if it remained largely intact. That's for sure. It was more amazing than any other timbered old town - the only "large" cities in Central Europe where you can get a glimpse of such a feeling nowadays are probably Strasbourg and Erfurt.


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goldene waage



braubachstrasse



sehr komische überblendung mit dieser steinmauer























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Old March 16th, 2017, 05:40 PM   #357
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Lovely impressions of the stucco ceiling for the "Goldene Waage" that is currently created in Saxony:

Source - http://www.domroemer.de/news/praecht...he-von-dresden









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Old March 24th, 2017, 06:31 PM   #358
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Dom-Römer old town quarter in the lower right corner:


20170313-ffm.dom.032017 139 by frank wolf, auf Flickr


A spectacular cityscape combining centuries of history, innit?
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Old April 7th, 2017, 12:32 PM   #359
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Braubachstrasse


They rebuild with original stones the old city wall here. Still looks awkward.

source Heimdall
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Old April 7th, 2017, 01:20 PM   #360
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^ It looks awkward indeed. But I'm glad they did it like this. Because it used to be like this and it leaves you curious. This kind of stuff is what makes grown old towns so mezmerizing and exciting.
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