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Old June 19th, 2013, 01:46 AM   #1
Winoc
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NEW YORK | Seaport City | 100m x ? | 300ft x ? | 10-40 fl x ? | Pro

'Seaport City' is revival of projects never realized
By Annie Karnie
June 14, 2013



Quote:
"The basic idea of LoLo is also in the Seaport City idea—the use of new development to pay for flood mitigation and levee protection," Mr. Chakrabarti said. "Instead of looking at it as running from the water, we need to protect it. New development may be part of the answer for how you pay for it."

City officials agreed Seaport City is intended to double as a storm-surge barrier and economic engine.


"This is primarily a resiliency initiative, not a development initiative," the president of the city's Economic Development Corp., Seth Pinsky, said in a phone interview. "But it is one that has the added benefit of providing economic-development dividends. We know that there's demand for land in Manhattan."


The eastern edge of lower Manhattan, from the Battery to Chinatown, is one of the island's lowest-lying areas, according to the city's report. Seaport City represents the administration's best idea for a longer-term approach for a protection system that could, in a best-case scenario, cost nothing or even raise money to fund resiliency initiatives in other parts of the city.


"If it is properly designed, and depending on what the market is at the time," Mr. Pinsky said, "we could create a project that has the capacity to fund itself—or at least fund itself in part—and maybe even generate surplus revenue to allow us to fund other resiliency measures in other parts of the city."

He added, "Based on the current market, there certainly are ways that you could imagine financing this privately or that you could cover the cost through the proceeds you would get from selling the land. It's too early, though, to be able to say that definitively."
Quote:
The biggest challenges in building Seaport City involve strict statutes enforced by the state Department of Environmental Conservation that govern landfill.


"Ever since Battery Park City, you basically can't do landfills in America anymore," said architect Stanton Eckstut, who designed the master plan for Battery Park City. "It's a no-no. But the mayor's idea is exactly right, and it's something that has been desirable from lower Manhattan's perspective for a long time."


While the mayor did not identify a source of landfill, the possibilities are many. "There's plenty of material you could get over the course of time," said Mr. Eckstut, noting that the navigation channels in the harbor are being dredged and could provide clean muck. Additional subway excavation could also provide fill.


But Mr. Chakrabarti said the first step would be regulatory changes.
"Maybe one solution is a federal override of state regulations when flood-protection measures are involved," he said.


Seaport City would be a long way off even if the mayor were just starting his term. As it stands, the best hope for the last 200 days of his administration is to get an in-depth study off the ground.


But there's little downside to trying, engineering experts argued. "If you couldn't get traction for Seaport City, a contingency plan would be to extend the integrated flood wall," said John Boule, vice president and Sandy program director at engineering giant Parsons Brinckerhoff. "That way, it wouldn't leave a big hole." The current plan calls for adaptable flood walls to be installed in the Lower East Side, Chinatown and the financial district.

Mr. Boule, who worked with the city to design the coastal-protection parts of the plan, agreed Seaport City was a heavy lift, but he remained optimistic for the idea to finally become a reality.
"Between resourcing and regulatory barriers, it's like putting people on the moon," said Mr. Boule said. "But I think that happened."
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http://www.flickr.com/photos/nycmayo...n/photostream/


Another nice waterfront development for NYC!
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Last edited by desertpunk; September 11th, 2013 at 10:01 PM.
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Old September 11th, 2013, 09:58 PM   #2
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NIMBYs Attack!

The Low-Down

Quote:
Seaport City is Luxury Development Scheme in Disguise,
CB3 Panel Says


City officials got an earful from members of Community Board 3 and local residents last night
concerning their plans for “Seaport City,” Mayor Bloomberg’s proposal to create a new neighborhood on the East River.




The NYC Economic Development Corp. is in the process of selecting a planning consultant to conduct a feasibility study. Last night’s briefing was led by Dan Zarrilli, the city’s director of resiliency. Seaport City is one of 250 recommendations detailed this past June by Bloomberg for protecting New York from future Hurricane Sandy-like storms. Using Battery Park City as a guide, planners are looking at whether a new land mass could be built as a way of protecting the densely populated communities along the East River.

But CB3 members expressed a huge amount of skepticism because city officials have signaled (although they denied this last night) that a complex levee system could potentially be paid for with large-scale market rate commercial and residential development along the waterfront. Zarrili said, repeatedly, that the plans are very preliminary and there are no pre-conceived notions about the project. But local activists in attendance, who have been fending off luxury development schemes on the East River for decades, were not buying it.

Zarrilli highlighted projections indicating that the city, already vulnerable to catastrophic flooding (as Sandy so vividly showed), will be in increasingly greater peril. He noted that last year’s hurricane cost the city $19 billion in damage and lost productivity, and warned that number could climb to $90 billion by the year 2050. Once a planning firm is selected, their mission will be to study an area from Pier 35, near Clinton Street, all the way to the Battery Maritime Building. He said the initial report could be ready by the end of the year, before Mayor Bloomberg leaves office.

David McWater, the co-chair of CB3′s land use committee, was not impressed by what he heard. “You come here and it’s the fear” of another storm, he said. “The only way to deal with (rising sea waters) is to build luxury housing” and to say to “the little people who got hurt in (Hurricane Sandy), the billionaire (developers) are coming in. It sticks in my craw.” Damaris Reyes, executive director of Good Old Lower East Side, a group that has pushed for public access on the East River, agreed wholeheartedly. “You are taking advantage of fear to further the city’s waterfront development agenda.” David Crane, another longtime CB3 member, said, “I don’t like the idea of building a wall around the neighborhood. It sounds like the Ninth Ward of New Orleans. A lot of people could die.”

[...]

As the city officials continued to insist that CB3′s alarm about the plan was premature, McWater strongly suggested they knew precisely how the process is going to go. “On December 31, there will be a report. You know exactly what it is going to say.” An official with the Economic Development Corp. countered, “we won’t be deaf to what we heard today.”

Community activists are not going to be waiting to hear from the city. They’re already mobilizing to fight the Seaport City proposal.
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Last edited by desertpunk; September 11th, 2013 at 10:04 PM.
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Old September 11th, 2013, 10:11 PM   #3
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Quote:
“I don’t like the idea of building a wall around the neighborhood. It sounds like the Ninth Ward of New Orleans. A lot of people could die.”
That is just a ridiculous statement.
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Old September 12th, 2013, 09:22 AM   #4
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A wall is a lot better than nothing and this could be an epic project if a design competition is held.
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Old June 8th, 2014, 04:19 PM   #5
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Seaport City Pits Odds of Flooding Against Odds of Ever Being Built

Thursday, May 22, 2014
WNYC

By Matthew Schuerman


Quote:
The proposed Seaport City project would be built to withstand a 100-year-storm and make a generous allowance for sea level rise, according to a just-released feasibility report. But that still would fall short of European standards, which often require projects to be designed to withstand a 1,000-year, or even 10,000-year, storm.


The difference in standards has sparked a debate between disaster experts concerned about the long-term viability of the project, and current and former city officials who fear that making Seaport City more resilient will have other consequences.
Flood-Resistant Neighborhood Would Be 80 Years in the Making

Study Predicts Building in East River Could Pay for Itself and Then Some

Thursday, May 22, 2014
WNYC

By Matthew Schuerman




Quote:
The preferred option calls for about 11.1 million gross square feet of residential space — roughly enough for 20,000 residents — and 7.7 million square feet of commercial office space. The amount of money the project would generate for other resiliency projects depends largely on how much affordable housing it would provide. A traditional 80/20 model (80 percent market rate, 20 percent subsidized housing for low-income families) would yield $900 million in today’s dollars over the life of the project, but only $70 million if developed on the 50/30/20 model that is increasingly coming into vogue (50 percent market, 30 percent for moderate-income families and 20 percent low-income).

This development just got a size boost, I'm guessing we will hear more of it sooner rather than later. Also, some of hose towers also look to be over 200M tall.
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Old June 8th, 2014, 09:01 PM   #6
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Making this flood resistant would also protect the land directly behind it.
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