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Old June 23rd, 2013, 07:09 AM   #21
Giorgio
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red v blue by OsakaBen, on Flickr

Melbourne former stock exchange and ANZ World Headquarters.
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Old June 23rd, 2013, 09:45 AM   #22
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Melbourne stock exchange is really beautiful, but honestly, I don't think this photo above shows the gothic building in a full glory - not all details are clearly visible in shadows.
Btw, looks like it's not Stock Exchange, it is Safe Deposit - they are nearby, both neo-gothic, by the same architect, but it's other building...

I know, this photo was supposed to show nice contrast between old and new architecture, but please let me add few more photos of both these buildings and some other works of great architect William Pitt in Melbourne:
Melbourne Stock Exchange / 380-392 Collins St. / 1891 / William Pitt


Photo by: boeyphotography

Melbourne Safe Deposit / 88-92 Queen St. / 1890 / William Pitt


Photo by thecollectormm

The Olderfleet / 471-477 Collins St. / 1889 / William Pitt
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The Olderfleet by Gruntfuttock, on Flickr

Neo-gothic building on the right: The Rialto / 497 Collins St. / 1891 / William Pitt
Building on the left not fit in this thread, it's not gothic, still nice and worth mention, since it is shown here anyway:
Winfield Building / 487-495 Collins St. / 1891 / Charles D'Ebro


Photo by nakedhungrytraveller

All from my list of "favorite buildings of Australia", hope you like it...
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Last edited by Chimer; June 23rd, 2013 at 09:49 AM. Reason: corrections...
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Old June 23rd, 2013, 01:13 PM   #23
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Thanks for that update! Yes I was too lazy to post better photos but I wanted to highlight the old neo-gothic and the new post-modernist with a gothic twist.

Great pics btw!
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Old June 23rd, 2013, 07:32 PM   #24
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Some more neo-gothic examples from Moscow. Not so luxurious and detailed as Melbourne, but still I like ‘em.

Mansion of Zinaida Morozova / Russia, Moscow / Spiridonovka st., 17 / 1898 / Architects: F.O.Schechtel, I.S.Kuznetsov / 55°45'40.41"N 37°35'28.29”E


photo by: http://peshegrad.ru/

Very rich Morosov’s family had few big mansions in Moscow, all of them are very nice, but only this one fit for this topic, other were build in different styles. Fyodor Osipovich Schechtel is one of most famous Moscow architects and a very productive one, but he is mostly know as a master of Art Nouveau, so this work is not very typical for him.

House of A.W.Kozlovskaya / Russia, Moscow / Povarskaya st., 28 / 1884 / Architect: K.I.Andreev / 55°45'17.96"N 37°35'35.79"E
Just a little house, but very nice:

photo from: moscow-gothica.livejournal.com
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Old June 23rd, 2013, 08:59 PM   #25
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The Sint-Jacobus de Meerderekerk (St. Jacobchurch) in The Hague. 1875-1878
Built and decorated by Dutch neo-gothic-superstar Pierre Cuypers. He built an unbelievable amount churches. Besides that he had a decoration company, which made an equal unbelievable amount of artworks for those churches as well as existing churches. It made things like statues, altars, paintings, benches, sculptures of all kinds and all the weird stuff catholic ceremonies need

Cuypers also made some other buildings, you might know him from the (recently reopened) Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam and the central trainstation in that same town.

One of the things Cuypers admired in the gothic architecture was it's constructive purity and therefore a kind of rationality. Cuypers translated that into the use of brick, the common buildingmaterial them and still is today. Natural stone was used for accentuating structure and sculptures.

Entrance


Brick may sound boring, unless you are a master of multicolour brickwork Which is another thing about Cuypers. He adhered the idea of polychrome interiors which represented, in his beliefs, the trough and pure medieval religious believes.
The main altar (which was also designed by Cuypers). The multicolour arches (green,red,yellow,white) are coloured brickwork, not paint. Surfaces and some columns have a decorative paintjob:


The entire church underwent a mayor renovation recently:


Never enough altars If you're the one producing them:


All kinds of details:



Everything comes from Wiki commons
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Ca...-subcategories
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Old June 23rd, 2013, 09:01 PM   #26
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Wow, that golden sculpture has to be the epitome of that church's interior.
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Old June 23rd, 2013, 09:52 PM   #27
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Like I said above, Pierre Cuypers also built the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam and the central railwaystation of Amsterdam. Although they are commonly perceived as neo-gothic, they are actually very eclectic. For a big part they can be perceived as Dutch neo-renaisance. But it's the striking towers and decoration that define their overall appearance and those are indeed neo-gothic.

The Rijksmuseum, 1885. Funny anecdote is that the king refused to officially open the building, because he found it dreadfully catholic looking.

South central facade


Amsterdam Central Railway Station, 1882-1989

Central upper facade, the lower part looks weird because it is printed on a renovation curtain.


All pictures from Wikimedia commons. Lot of details and decorations to see there.
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Old June 23rd, 2013, 09:54 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L.A.F.2. View Post
Wow, that golden sculpture has to be the epitome of that church's interior.
Which golden sculpture?
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Old June 23rd, 2013, 10:05 PM   #29
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Maybe the first by a little.

After looking, the third statue is actually Art Nouveau. You can see the difference in the Gothic pointed arches of the first two and the A.N. triple arch of the third.
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Old June 23rd, 2013, 11:38 PM   #30
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The trefoil arch is indeed a gothic shape.

---

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vincen1 View Post
Like I said above, Pierre Cuypers also built the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam and the central railwaystation of Amsterdam. Although they are commonly perceived as neo-gothic, they are actually very eclectic. For a big part they can be perceived as Dutch neo-renaisance. But it's the striking towers and decoration that define their overall appearance and those are indeed neo-gothic.
That one's not gothic at all.
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Old June 23rd, 2013, 11:43 PM   #31
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Yeah, looks more Baroque than anything to me.
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Old June 23rd, 2013, 11:48 PM   #32
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eclecticism
I see the baroque aspect, though.
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Old June 23rd, 2013, 11:50 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThatOneGuy View Post
The trefoil arch is indeed a gothic shape.

---


My bad, I didn't realize that. Guess I've just always associated it with A.N.
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Old June 23rd, 2013, 11:52 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThatOneGuy View Post

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eclecticism
I see the baroque aspect, though.
Wow, I have never actually heard of this. Thanks for the link.
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Old June 24th, 2013, 01:24 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThatOneGuy View Post

That one's not gothic at all.
Not so fast, like I said it is eclectic. There are countless gothic details to find. Don't focus too much on the arches. On Wikimedia commons there are lots of details to see, but it would be too much to post them all here because they are eclectic. I thought it would be interesting two examples of how gothic interpretations could end up in that time. Especially because it are the two biggest buildings of a neo-gothic masterbuilder.

What you see is what was thought of as a mix neo-gothic and Dutch neo-renaissance. If you want to see an example of Dutch renaissance (like from renaissance times) you could take a look at the Kloveniersdoelen in Middelburg. If you want to see a example of what was seen of as Dutch neo-renaissance you should search for the ´Stedelijk Museum´ of Amsterdam. That was seen as a historically correct style for something like a museum.

Cuypers' buildings though were seen way too Gothic for the taste of the city council. The Rijksmuseum more then the Railwaystation. And it's actually ironic you don't see the gothic elements in them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by L.A.F.2. View Post
Yeah, looks more Baroque than anything to me.
No, baroque is véry different.
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Old June 24th, 2013, 02:37 AM   #36
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Zagreb cathedral, Croatia

image hosted on flickr

DSC_0342 by rsharinta, on Flickr
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Old June 24th, 2013, 02:41 AM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vincen1 View Post
Not so fast, like I said it is eclectic. There are countless gothic details to find. Don't focus too much on the arches. On Wikimedia commons there are lots of details to see, but it would be too much to post them all here because they are eclectic. I thought it would be interesting two examples of how gothic interpretations could end up in that time. Especially because it are the two biggest buildings of a neo-gothic masterbuilder.
It's just that I don't see any traces of gothic. I see Romanesque, Byzantine, a bunch of stuff, but nothing gothic.
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Old June 24th, 2013, 02:44 AM   #38
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Inside Zagreb cathedral

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Inside the Zagreb Cathedral by myhong08, on Flickr

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Inside the Zagreb Cathedral by myhong08, on Flickr


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Inside the Zagreb Cathedral by myhong08, on Flickr
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Old June 24th, 2013, 04:06 AM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vincen1 View Post
The Sint-Jacobus de Meerderekerk (St. Jacobchurch) in The Hague. 1875-1878
Built and decorated by Dutch neo-gothic-superstar Pierre Cuypers. He built an unbelievable amount churches. Besides that he had a decoration company, which made an equal unbelievable amount of artworks for those churches as well as existing churches. It made things like statues, altars, paintings, benches, sculptures of all kinds and all the weird stuff catholic ceremonies need

Cuypers also made some other buildings, you might know him from the (recently reopened) Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam and the central trainstation in that same town.

One of the things Cuypers admired in the gothic architecture was it's constructive purity and therefore a kind of rationality. Cuypers translated that into the use of brick, the common buildingmaterial them and still is today. Natural stone was used for accentuating structure and sculptures....

Everything comes from Wiki commons
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Ca...-subcategories

Very interesting information - I always enjoy reading about the design and development of churches. I can see the medieval Christian spirit expressed in 19th century construction.

And a very beautiful church.
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Old June 24th, 2013, 04:08 AM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vincen1 View Post
Like I said above, Pierre Cuypers also built the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam and the central railwaystation of Amsterdam. Although they are commonly perceived as neo-gothic, they are actually very eclectic. For a big part they can be perceived as Dutch neo-renaisance. But it's the striking towers and decoration that define their overall appearance and those are indeed neo-gothic.

The Rijksmuseum, 1885. Funny anecdote is that the king refused to officially open the building, because he found it dreadfully catholic looking..
It does look like a Catholic university.

Very imposing and impressive building.
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“The meaning of earthly existence lies not, as we have grown used to thinking, in prospering but in the development of the soul.”
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

"We are more closely connected to the invisible than to the visible"

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