daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Forums > Architecture > Classic Architecture

Classic Architecture Discussions on heritage buildings, monuments and landmarks.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old July 5th, 2013, 01:32 PM   #1
Sandstein
Registered User
 
Sandstein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 215
Likes (Received): 270

Revivalist or Historicist architecture

Revivalism, also known as Historicism, is the main architectural style of the 19th century. It was characterized by the "revival" of all previous architectural styles, and also by a creative combination of them which led to eclecticism. Although being heavily despised by Modernist architects, I believe that we owe this style some of the most famous and also some of the most beautiful buildings in the world.

Overview: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Revival...rchitecture%29


Neoclassicism (United States Capitol):

image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/wwarby/2230706526/


Romanesque Revival
/Neo-Romanesque (Neuschwanstein Castle):

image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/josevaldivieso/6325181022/


Gothic Revival/Neo-Gothic (Palace of Westminster):

image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/4924013390/


Renaissance Revival/Neo-Renaissance (Vienna State Opera):


http://blog.wienerlinien.at/wp-conte...13/03/oper.jpg


Baroque Revival/Neo-Baroque (Opéra Garnier):


http://static.elegantconcierge.com/i...3787294553.jpg
__________________

NUMERATZI, BringMe liked this post

Last edited by Sandstein; July 7th, 2013 at 12:45 PM.
Sandstein no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old July 8th, 2013, 12:42 PM   #2
Sandstein
Registered User
 
Sandstein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 215
Likes (Received): 270

"Kurhaus" in Wiesbaden, Germany: (Neoclassicism)


exterior:

image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/hermenau/6987738337/


interior:

image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/_o_de_andrade_/3539678184/

image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/matthiaswicke/4600406851/


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...-Saal_Loge.JPG
__________________

BringMe, Chadoh25 liked this post
Sandstein no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 11th, 2013, 08:58 AM   #3
TimothyR
Ike
 
TimothyR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Born in NYC, Living in Boston
Posts: 1,264
Likes (Received): 2085

Interesting topic.

One of the best examples is the Ringstrasse in Vienna. The magnificent buildings along the boulevard represent many different examples of revivalist and historicist architecture.

The Kunsthistorisches Museum is stunning.

The beautiful building was designed by Gotfried Semper and Karl von Hasenauer in the neo-Renaissance style.

I found an interesting observation about the choice of style that explains the interplay of political and cultural and artistic issues:

Quote:
There were several options, but the Vienna museum could be built neither in strictly classical style which in this city was connected with democracy, nor in Neo-Gothic style which in this context would evoke liberal bourgeois attitudes. Both these connotations were totally out of place in the imperial museum and, evidently, the only possible option was a cosmopolitan Neo-Renaissance - Jan Bažant.
http://www.colbud.hu/mult_ant/Getty-...ls/Bazant6.htm





http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...en-Denkmal.jpg




The interior includes wonderful neo-Baroque design.




http://cdn3.vtourist.com/4/6238898-H...KHM_Vienna.jpg




http://www.rtk.at/upload/hotel_pics/...useum_NEU3.jpg


So here we have two styles in the exterior and interior of this architectural masterwork.
__________________

“In keeping silent about evil, in burying it so deep within us that no sign of it appears on the surface, we are implanting it, and it will rise up a thousand fold in the future. When we neither punish nor reproach evildoers we are thereby ripping the foundations of justice from beneath new generations.”

“The meaning of earthly existence lies not, as we have grown used to thinking, in prospering but in the development of the soul.”
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

"We are more closely connected to the invisible than to the visible"

-Novalis

Chimer, Sandstein liked this post

Last edited by TimothyR; July 11th, 2013 at 09:18 AM.
TimothyR no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 11th, 2013, 09:29 AM   #4
TimothyR
Ike
 
TimothyR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Born in NYC, Living in Boston
Posts: 1,264
Likes (Received): 2085

Here we have the Vienna Opera House on the Ringstrasse.

Another neo-Renaissance building of great, imposing beauty.



http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-CR7b2L9I9O...ctures+(9).jpg





https://www.toeurope.eu/design/photo...ouse-27059.jpg







http://inmozartsfootsteps.com/wp-con...3/IMG_4127.jpg
__________________

“In keeping silent about evil, in burying it so deep within us that no sign of it appears on the surface, we are implanting it, and it will rise up a thousand fold in the future. When we neither punish nor reproach evildoers we are thereby ripping the foundations of justice from beneath new generations.”

“The meaning of earthly existence lies not, as we have grown used to thinking, in prospering but in the development of the soul.”
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

"We are more closely connected to the invisible than to the visible"

-Novalis

HURZ liked this post
TimothyR no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 13th, 2013, 01:15 AM   #5
Tyco75
Orgulloso de ser TICO
 
Tyco75's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: La Uruca, San José
Posts: 4,771
Likes (Received): 504

Beautiful pics.
Tyco75 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 4th, 2013, 04:41 PM   #6
Sandstein
Registered User
 
Sandstein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 215
Likes (Received): 270

Quote:
Originally Posted by TimothyR View Post
One of the best examples is the Ringstrasse in Vienna. The magnificent buildings along the boulevard represent many different examples of revivalist and historicist architecture.
That's true, the Ringstraße is a unique collection of almost all main Revivalist styles.


Quote:
Originally Posted by TimothyR View Post
I found an interesting observation about the choice of style that explains the interplay of political and cultural and artistic issues:
It's a main feature of Historicism that you can recognize the purpose of a building by its style.


Parliament Building ("Parlamentsgebäude"): (Neoclassicism)

image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/photos-pfi/1106779428/


http://bilder.tibs.at/pics/32150.jpg


Vienna City Hall ("Wiener Rathaus"): (Neo-Gothic)


http://www.flickr.com/photos/swampa/8371699293/

image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/simlinger/5921604924/


University of Vienna ("Wiener Universität"): (Neo-Renaissance)

image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/alexand...nn/4697733644/


Votive Church ("Votivkirche"): (Neo-Gothic)


http://de.academic.ru/pictures/dewik...he_um_1900.jpg


http://th03.deviantart.net/fs70/PRE/...ry-d3az5ig.jpg
__________________

gdlrar, Chadoh25, Roman_P, JohnnyMass, CF221 and 1 others liked this post

Last edited by Sandstein; August 6th, 2013 at 11:34 AM.
Sandstein no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 25th, 2013, 09:06 PM   #7
dj4life
Registered User
 
dj4life's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: World
Posts: 24,278
Likes (Received): 48497

Bolinder Palace Hotel with Kungliga Automobilklubben (KAK)/The Royal Swedish Automobile Club, Stockholm, Sweden:

image hosted on flickr

IMG_2200 by gevrenol, on Flickr


http://www.flickr.com/photos/cjboffoli/9585815417/

image hosted on flickr

#stockholm #sweden par Lana Danilova, sur Flickr
__________________

bolg, Chimer, TimothyR, HURZ liked this post
dj4life no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 4th, 2013, 07:21 PM   #8
Chimer
friendly gargoyle
 
Chimer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,481
Likes (Received): 2487

Neo-Renaissance

Roßbach Palais
Germany, Leipzig / Beethovenstraße 8 / 1892 / architect: Arwed Roßbach
(He is grand-master of this style, may be I'll post some more of his works later).


Source: wikipedia, author: Appaloosa
__________________

HURZ liked this post
Chimer no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 4th, 2013, 07:43 PM   #9
Chimer
friendly gargoyle
 
Chimer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,481
Likes (Received): 2487

Neo-Renaissance

Riga Bourse
Riga, Latvia / Doma laukums 6 / 1855 / architect: Harald Julius von Bosse
(Now there is an art museum in this building. Most impressive thing about this building - all statues are different).


Source: http://travellersdiarynote.blogspot....rt-museum.html
__________________

bolg, CF221, agent 007 liked this post
Chimer no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 5th, 2013, 01:38 PM   #10
Sandstein
Registered User
 
Sandstein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 215
Likes (Received): 270

Palace of Justice ("Palais de justice/Justitiepaleis") in Brussels: (Eclecticism, predominantly Neoclassicism)

This colossus by Joseph Poelaert is the largest building of the 19th century and still in use as a court house.


image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/1864338...n/photostream/

image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/sabra10...n/photostream/

image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/vlvldk/...n/photostream/

image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/fry2k/4...n/photostream/
__________________

CF221, NUMERATZI, HURZ liked this post

Last edited by Sandstein; March 14th, 2014 at 03:07 PM.
Sandstein no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 5th, 2013, 06:15 PM   #11
Geography
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 447
Likes (Received): 103

Thanks for posting these pictures, Sandstein! They are incredible! They make me wonder how architecture standards have fallen so low. Architecture engineering and interior design is certainly better than 200 years ago, but modern external design just cannot compare to these great buildings.
Geography no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 6th, 2013, 03:00 AM   #12
TimothyR
Ike
 
TimothyR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Born in NYC, Living in Boston
Posts: 1,264
Likes (Received): 2085

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandstein View Post
That's true, the Ringstraße is a unique collection of almost all main Revivalist styles.
Votive Church ("Votivkirche"): (Neo-Gothic)


http://de.academic.ru/pictures/dewik...he_um_1900.jpg


http://th03.deviantart.net/fs70/PRE/...ry-d3az5ig.jpg

Magnificent.
__________________

“In keeping silent about evil, in burying it so deep within us that no sign of it appears on the surface, we are implanting it, and it will rise up a thousand fold in the future. When we neither punish nor reproach evildoers we are thereby ripping the foundations of justice from beneath new generations.”

“The meaning of earthly existence lies not, as we have grown used to thinking, in prospering but in the development of the soul.”
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

"We are more closely connected to the invisible than to the visible"

-Novalis

gdlrar liked this post
TimothyR no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 12th, 2013, 07:10 PM   #13
EKE
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 3
Likes (Received): 2

I actually don't like the terms "revivalist" or "historicist" because I think they buy into the modernist premise of a zeitgeist, or a "style of our time", which is a simplistic and reductionist way to view the evolution of architecture and art. Modernists have so completely accepted the notion of a "ladder of progress" leading from admired but inferior styles of the past to allegedly superior "styles of today" that they are unable to see art and architecture in classical styles as anything but historical and retrograde.

In the case of buildings inspired by Greco-Roman classical prototypes, there is an unbroken tradition tracing back to antiquity, interrupted, tragically, only by the invasion of the Bauhaus modernists in the 1920s-30s. So, while I know the historians like to call a lot of this 18th, 19th, and early 20th century work "revivalist" or "historicist", it's just not as simple as that - I believe that view is a crude simplification of a rich, nuanced and continuous legacy.
__________________

Chimer liked this post
EKE no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 02:15 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu