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Old April 8th, 2014, 07:13 PM   #3501
dimlys1994
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Today official from TfL:

Quote:
http://origin.tfl.gov.uk/corporate/m...tre/29938.aspx

London Underground's £330 million stations programme set to make 70 stations fit for the next decade
08 April 2014

Underground passengers across the network will see their stations modernised with upgraded flooring, walls and ceilings, CCTV systems and energy-efficient lighting in a £330 million Station Stabilisation programme over the next seven years

London Underground (LU) has selected more than 20 contractors and three multi-discipline design firms to bring a new innovative and collaborative approach to the work, which will see 70 stations modernised and maintained to a common standard that will mean no significant further work should be needed for ten further years.

Stations that will benefit from the work include Embankment, Paddington, Earls Court, South Kensington and Charing Cross.

This will ensure that customers experience fewer planned or unplanned station closures for remedial work, will further improve LU's excellent staff and customer safety record and will bear down on operating costs through sound, targeted improvements to maintain station facilities.

The Programme will use LU's Stake delivery model, designed to create greater efficiency by reducing sub-contractor layers in the supply chain. LU will be engaging directly with small to medium enterprises (SMEs) to employ the craftspeople who will deliver work on-site.

The seven-year programme will enable suppliers and their craftspeople to work closely with LU to improve delivery with a focus on delivering high quality work first time, leading to increased value across the programme and reduced unit costs.

LU is also working with the successful suppliers to establish craft academies to support the aim of delivering work faster and on a larger scale.

Academies will provide craft skills training as well as frontline leadership for supervisors and construction managers on the skills and practices needed to deliver the programme efficiently.

LU's Programme Director for Stations, Miles Ashley, said:

'This programme of work will see 70 stations brought up to a modern standard, which will not only mean better, brighter customer journeys, but will also mean less closures for remedial work that can cause disruption.

'Construction supply chains have become multi-tiered and fragmented, and it could be said that the industry has lost sight of the importance of craft skills in delivering efficiently.

Great craftsmanship is the key to the success of any infrastructure project, and our Stake approach allows long-term engagement with the people at the workface and recognises that they are the most valuable part of our team.'

The new approach's principle is 'production leads, everything else enables', a shift in focus that has been assisted with LU's adoption of Stuttgart-based DS Consulting's Collaborative Planning methodology, a process to provide trade supervisors with the tools to drive production at the work-face which was successfully used in refurbishing LU's Embankment station.

Refurbishment project manager Jeevani Subasinghe said:

'Stake has provided the flexibility to work closely with our suppliers and organise work to reduce our project delivery times.'

Suppliers have also welcomed the LU approach. Alex Morrissey, Director of tiling contractor DMC, said:

'Stake is opening up opportunities to value engineer and innovate in ways that weren't possible under conventional sub-contracting arrangements.

It's a breath of fresh air which values our skill and knowledge.'

The appointed contractors and designers are:

Appointed contractors: Wingate, Delatim, Giffin Group, Atkins, Fourway, Magnolia, Emerald, Close Brothers, Livis, DMC, Excel, K&M McLoughlin, JNG, HA Marks, AGS, Community Clean, UKDN Waterflow, Lanes Group, Hillmore Fire Protection, Young & Young Security, TRAD Scaffolding, Millcroft

Appointed designers: Atkins, Jacobs, Capita

The Stake delivery model is a UK trial project under Infrastructure UK, a unit within the Treasury that works on the UK's long-term infrastructure priorities.

The unit is responsible for achieving greater value for money on infrastructure projects.

Stake adheres to six key principles:
  • Engaging with the SME contractors who actually do the work on-site;
  • Simplified contract arrangements with LU taking the majority of the risk;
  • Giving a long-term commitment to suppliers;
  • Having competent and capable resources;
  • Creating a 'one team' approach;
  • 'Production leads, everything else enables'.
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Old April 8th, 2014, 07:36 PM   #3502
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Manchester77 View Post
The only issue I can see is with the addition of Crossrail through the Liverpool street area of the map, which is already quite busy looking, could make the map quite confusing.
The map will need a revamp in the center when Crossrail opens.

@RSena11 [email protected]

Thank you

In the next version I may try to implement the tram link but in a very schematic way, there is no room for a detailed description of the routes and stations.

@Sotonosi

Thank you for your review and kind words

Quote:
Originally Posted by sotonsi View Post
Though I'm more concerned with the Met's route between Preston Road and Harrow-on-the-Hill (and how will the Croxely link be shown?) due to the title box taking its corner.
Not easy to fit everything in a square. When a new line or an extension is created the map will need adjustments in that area.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sotonsi View Post
The lettered boxes that add nothing and DLR and Overground are too pale. I'm not sure that the Heathrow Connect/Express services should get publicity, and you've missed off the Connect stops other than Ealing (and very importantly, their Heathrow stations are not in zone 6). And why Hyde Park/Kensington Gardens but no other parks?
I used the same nomenclature for London as for other subway maps. People used to number labeling of the lines will find it useful to see the initials of London tube lines in order to recognize them.
Anyway I have to find a way to show that they are not within the zoning system.

Only a minimum of specific geographic features are shown on the map, those relevant for orientation in the enlarged city center. Hyde Park fits.

Again I have shown Heathrow Express and Connect links because of the same policy on other maps. It is a legitimate matter of debate weather to promote private services when a public one is available. Up to now I have tried to give the users enough information to make a choice.

Take a look at my other maps on www.inat.fr
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Old April 8th, 2014, 09:27 PM   #3503
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zidar fr View Post
Not easy to fit everything in a square. When a new line or an extension is created the map will need adjustments in that area.
Yes, the square is the wrong shape for London. But it does fit, as you have taken a big bite out of the square with that title rectangle, which could easily go to the blank space left by straightening out the Met.
Quote:
I used the same nomenclature for London as for other subway maps.
There's the problem, taking a one-size-fits-all approach and making every city the same, when they are different. 90% of the design rules you are using are excellent, but uniformity works against usefulness here.
Quote:
People used to number labeling of the lines will find it useful to see the initials of London tube lines in order to recognize them.
Really? The extra clutter makes things harder to read, and the colours do the job well enough...

They make sense in New York, where a colour does not equal a line. Paris does it, but it owes a lot to not being a good map, with pastel colours on a pastel background hiding the lines, etc. With your maps (inc Paris) you can see that the line ends at X pretty clearly as you've drawn a good map.

Is Overground '0' rather than O as you've given 'O' to the Circle line (as the Central takes 'C')?
Quote:
Only a minimum of specific geographic features are shown on the map, those relevant for orientation in the enlarged city center. Hyde Park fits.
But why show it at all? Either you show all main parks, or you show no parks. That Hyde Park happens to be in the right place is not a good reason to show it.
Quote:
Again I have shown Heathrow Express and Connect links because of the same policy on other maps. It is a legitimate matter of debate weather to promote private services when a public one is available. Up to now I have tried to give the users enough information to make a choice.
All NR services in London are private (as is the dangleway). The big issue with showing HEx and HC is that even the cheaper Connect service costs 3 times the price to get to Paddington (and no further, whereas the tube would give you all of London for that price) - the Express is about 5 times the price! While there is the choice, it isn't a helpful one to show. The all rail lines map used to have a big box saying that taking the train to Heathrow via Hayes will be very expensive. At £5.90 from Hayes to/from Heathrow single (one stop), for 10p more (off peak) you can travel from Hayes to zone 1 and back on Oyster.

Last edited by sotonsi; April 8th, 2014 at 09:34 PM.
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Old April 9th, 2014, 05:21 PM   #3504
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@Sotonosi

Really? The extra clutter makes things harder to read, and the colours do the job well enough...
They make sense in New York, where a colour does not equal a line. Paris does it, but it owes a lot to not being a good map, with pastel colours on a pastel background hiding the lines, etc. With your maps (inc Paris) you can see that the line ends at X pretty clearly as you've drawn a good map.


London network is quite specific in the fact that different services may operate on the same line, services terminate at different stations, the directions are announced (as far as I know) geographically (North bound, West bound...). NYC subway is quite similar.
In most other metro networks there is only one service on the line and 2 terminal stations. So for orientation in the system you need 2 elements: the name of the last station you are heading to and the number of the line (color is not enough as for example in Paris nobody can agree on the name of the colors since uncommon shades are used for the comfort of visually impaired people)
That's where color labels com handy, they immediately give you both information: the number on them and the last station next to them.

Is Overground '0' rather than O as you've given 'O' to the Circle line (as the Central takes 'C')?

It's a different O, Overground is Din and Circle is Courier new.
Maybe I should label overground Ø

But why show it at all? Either you show all main parks, or you show no parks. That Hyde Park happens to be in the right place is not a good reason to show it.

Parks are relevant only inside the circle line where geography is respected.
I think St Jame's Park and Green Park are to small to be relevant whereas Hyde Park/Kensington Gardens is huge and is a real urban feature, organizing the city just like Central Park in NYC or Imperial Palace in Tokyo do.

All NR services in London are private (as is the dangleway). The big issue with showing HEx and HC is that even the cheaper Connect service costs 3 times the price to get to Paddington (and no further, whereas the tube would give you all of London for that price) - the Express is about 5 times the price! While there is the choice, it isn't a helpful one to show. The all rail lines map used to have a big box saying that taking the train to Heathrow via Hayes will be very expensive. At £5.90 from Hayes to/from Heathrow single (one stop), for 10p more (off peak) you can travel from Hayes to zone 1 and back on Oyster.


I wasn't aware of the huge disparity in fares. Thank you for the information, I will have to think about reflecting that on the map.
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Old April 9th, 2014, 06:50 PM   #3505
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zidar fr View Post
London network is quite specific in the fact that different services may operate on the same line, services terminate at different stations, the directions are announced (as far as I know) geographically (North bound, West bound...).
Indeed, but you've highlighted only termini that are at end of lines - no Arnos Grove, Tower Hill, Plaistow, Rayners Lane, Ruislip, Golders Green, Willesden Green, North Greenwich, White City, Queens Park, Dalston Junction, Willesden Junction, Northfields, Kennington, Hainault, Woodford, Newbury Park, etc...

Termini, however, are only important on line diagrams on platforms to make sure you are getting on the right train - as you point out, direction is the way that lines are described in London.
Quote:
That's where color labels com handy, they immediately give you both information: the number on them and the last station next to them.
Both of which are irrelevant in London as neither number/letter or last station are used to navigate the tube. The colour is given by the line on the map (and unlike Paris, they are quite clear which is which).

It is meaningless, useless, clutter at best and misleading uniformity that will confuse visitors* at worst.

Still don't understand why Hyde Park, but not Regents Park (which is just as central - the circle line isn't a good definer of central). Neither organise the city, or provide any geographical hint (especially given your stylised Hyde Park doesn't make it clear that Marble Arch is at a corner) that is needed. It strikes me as 'well New York has Central Park, therefore other cities will need a park on the map' uniformity - might be good artistic design, but makes bad diagram design.

*the very same people you put these labels in for to 'help' them navigate will get confused at the lack of them in stations, being lulled into a false sense of security that London works the same as their home network.
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Old April 9th, 2014, 09:35 PM   #3506
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Some of the proposed designs from Acanthus LW Architects for future Croxley Rail Link - the extension of Metropolitan tube line, planned for completion in 2017. More you can find here:



Cassiobridge (Ascot Road) station:







And viaduct over Grand Union Canal:



If I wrong with something, please correct me

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Old April 10th, 2014, 06:34 AM   #3507
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Have they settled on a final name for Ascot Road/Cassiobury yet? It's Cassiobury in the renders but Ascot Road in the description on the website you link to and on the map you've supplied. Even more confusing is the presence of Watford Met on that map. My understanding was that it would still be closed with the track being used for stabling of rail stock.

I'm not too keen on all these box designs for new stations in and around London. Just personal aesthetics mind...
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Old April 10th, 2014, 07:41 AM   #3508
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Originally Posted by CairnsTony View Post
Have they settled on a final name for Ascot Road/Cassiobury yet?
Yes, they settled with the name in August last year
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Old April 12th, 2014, 10:01 PM   #3509
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Officially from Crossrail - new Pudding Mill Lane DLR station will be opened on the 28th April. Link

From that leaflet:

Quote:
The new station will be the largest on the DLR network and will provide extended platforms, better protection from the weather, retail outlets and seating and will eventually allow 15 trains per hour rather than the current 10 per hour
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Old April 17th, 2014, 10:09 PM   #3510
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Official from TfL:

Quote:
http://www.tfl.gov.uk/info-for/media...on-underground

RMT leaders urged to return to Tube talks as they reject significant changes proposed by London Underground
17 April 2014

LU’s proposals would see unparalleled levels of face-to-face customer service, as seen during the London 2012 Games
  • More visible and available staff – rather than under-used ticket offices – to serve customers at ticket machines, gate lines and platforms in future
  • LU makes significant changes to proposals, following more than 40 meetings over eight weeks
  • Commitments made so that no supervisors need reapply for jobs, no compulsory redundancies, all applications for voluntary redundancy honoured and to look at ways to ensure no staff lose pay
  • Only RMT union threatening further strike action, despite offering no credible alternative proposals
London Underground (LU) has urged the RMT leadership to return to discussions to shape the future of the Tube, after it became the only union to call for further strike action over LU’s plans to radically improve customer service.

Over the last two months, the LU team has held intensive discussions with all trade unions, meeting more than 40 times to discuss the future in immense detail. LU listened to the concerns raised, both directly from staff and via the unions, and made highly significant changes to its proposals as a result, including:
  • removing the proposed selection process for supervisor-level staff, which means that no supervisor will have to ‘apply for their own job’;
  • committing to looking at ways to ensure that no will lose pay as a result of these changes;
  • offering voluntary severance for all 650 staff who have already applied for it. A second opportunity to apply will also be available and LU promised to honour all requests up to a total of around 950;
  • ensuring a Customer Service Supervisor will staff smaller, local stations at all times.
LU also again confirmed that change will be achieved with no compulsory redundancies and there is a job for any member of staff who wants to be part of LU’s future and is willing to be flexible.

Three unions (ASLEF, TSSA and Unite) have agreed that further discussion around the plans would be productive and this next phase of talks will begin next week. The RMT has rejected these changes and demanded that all of LU’s proposals to improve customer service be scrapped in their entirety. They have not, however, put forward any credible alternative proposals.

LU set out in November last year how customer service will be radically improved in the future. The plan includes a new 24-hour ‘Night Tube’ service at weekends and, in keeping with the service provided during the London 2012 Games, more staff visible and available at stations to help customers buy the right ticket, plan their journeys and keep them safe and secure. At some of the busiest stations – Euston, King’s Cross St Pancras, Liverpool Street, Paddington, Piccadilly Circus and Victoria, as well as at Gatwick Airport – new Visitor Information Centres (VICs) will ensure that those unfamiliar with the Tube, including tourists and visitors to London, are provided with the service and assistance they need. VICs will also continue to sell tickets at these locations.

LU has made five commitments to customers:
  • All stations will remain staffed and controlled at all times, with more staff visible and available to help customers and keep them safe and secure
  • A new 24-hour service on core parts of the Tube network at weekends from 2015
  • More frequent and reliable train services with better, more accessible stations
  • Simpler ticketing, including contactless bank card payment with daily and weekly fares capping
  • The best possible value by running our services as efficiently as possible while improving customer service
Phil Hufton, London Underground’s Chief Operating Officer, said: "It is people – our customers and staff – who are at the heart of the future of the Tube. Rather than our staff being stuck behind glass screens in under-utilised ticket offices, they will be at ticket machines, gate lines and platforms offering the levels of customer service our customers enjoyed during the London 2012 Games, keeping them safe and secure at all times.

"Over the past eight weeks, we have met with our trades union colleagues on over 40 occasions, listening to their concerns and making significant changes as a result. I’ve committed to looking at ways to ensure that no one will lose pay and no supervisor will have to apply for their own job. There will be no compulsory redundancies and all requests for voluntary redundancy will be honoured.

“However, the RMT leadership has rejected these changes and has not put forward any credible alternative proposals. Next week, we will sit down again with the ASLEF, TSSA and Unite unions for further discussions on our plans and how we can meet the needs of our customers in 21st century London. I urge the RMT to join us, rather than threaten further unnecessary disruption to Londoners. All a strike will achieve is lose those who take part pay for each day of action.”

Phil Hufton also committed to continuing to work with staff to improve the Tube. He said
"We will also continue to work with our staff directly to build on all of their excellent achievements in improving the reliability of the Tube and the customer service we deliver. That will only be achieved through talking, not by taking industrial action."

LU has also today published answers to the questions customers frequently ask about ticket offices and the future of customer service on the Tube (see Notes to Editors). Given the success of Oyster and advances in on-line and ticket machine technology, the use of ticket offices has dramatically fallen. Today, less than 3 per cent of journeys involve a visit to a ticket office. This trend is set to continue with the introduction of contactless bank card payment.

When customers do use a ticket office, it is for three main reasons – to buy a ticket, fix a ticketing problem or get information. By making more staff available in the public areas of stations – at ticket machines, gate lines and platforms – these services will be significantly improved for customers.

Station safety and security is not controlled by ticket offices but by Station Supervisors or, in larger stations, dedicated control rooms located elsewhere on the station. These arrangements will continue in future.
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Old April 18th, 2014, 04:57 PM   #3511
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Old and new Pudding Mill Lane DLR station, all photos taken from IanVisits blog:



Blueprint of Pudding Mill Lane area:



Some other photos from area. The station is now closed for final fit-out, and as I was said, the station will open on 28th April:









RIP old PML:







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Old April 22nd, 2014, 06:55 PM   #3512
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Refubrished Old Street station subway:

TfL Image - Old Street Station area 2 by Transport for London Press Images, on Flickr

TfL Image - Old Street Station area 1 by Transport for London Press Images, on Flickr

TfL Image - Old Street Station area 3 by Transport for London Press Images, on Flickr
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Old April 22nd, 2014, 09:07 PM   #3513
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That's helpful - I had to double check my exits and check I went to the right one when I went to Hoxton.

Last edited by sotonsi; April 22nd, 2014 at 09:14 PM.
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Old April 22nd, 2014, 09:34 PM   #3514
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From London SE1:

Quote:
http://www.london-se1.co.uk/news/view/7540

Bakerloo line extension: Old Kent Road route becomes more likely
Sunday 20 April 2014

Southwark's ruling Labour administration has issued a tacit admission that its desire to see a future Bakerloo line extension to Camberwell and Peckham is likely to lose out in favour of the rival Old Kent Road proposal

Cllr Fiona Colley, Southwark's cabinet member for regeneration and corporate strategy, has written to Mayor of London Boris Johnson welcoming his decision to designate the Old Kent Road as an 'opportunity area' with a target to build at least 2,500 new homes.

Whilst Southwark's Labour administration has consistently lobbied for any future Bakerloo line extension beyond Elephant & Castle to follow the route of the Walworth Road towards its political heartlands of Camberwell and Peckham, Cllr Colley has now admitted that an eastwards tube extension via Old Kent Road could be linked to large-scale house-building plans in that area.

In her letter to Boris Johnson, Cllr Colley says Southwark would "welcome working more closely with the Mayor to identify opportunities for assistance in delivering more homes such as by supporting infrastructure improvements such as facilitating the extension of the Bakerloo line, and providing grant and financial support to schemes".

An appendix to the letter specifically notes that "further support for the expansion of the Bakerloo line could provide more opportunity for new homes in the newly identified Old Kent Road opportunity area".

More than 2,750 people have signed a petition launched by Southwark Labour leader Peter John calling for the Bakerloo line to serve Camberwell and Peckham whilst a rival petition backing the Old Kent Road route option has received the backing of 120 people
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Old April 22nd, 2014, 10:09 PM   #3515
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Just a few photos from my trip to London in late 2013.

Bakerloo line train





Bond Street Tube Station



Westminster Tube Station





Northern Line at Bank Station



Central Line at Shepherds Bush



Circle Line at Wood Lane Station (new rolling stock, yey)



District Line next to Piccadilly line train at Hammersmith Station



DLR at Bank



Interior of DLR



Canary Wharf DLR Station



Canary Wharf Jubilee Line





Jubilee at Stratford Station







Piccadilly Circus Station


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Old April 22nd, 2014, 11:45 PM   #3516
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Svartmetall View Post
Central Line at Bank Station
Thanks for those photos better than the regular images you see on tube groups which try to be arty and don't really show off the system, just one thing; that should be northern line: the train is an un refurbished 1995 stock note the yellow door pole with black thing.
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Old April 22nd, 2014, 11:50 PM   #3517
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Oh whoops! Good grief that was a stupid error. When I lived in the UK I came into Euston so spent my life taking the Northern line... Will correct that in my post.
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Old April 23rd, 2014, 02:03 AM   #3518
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Originally Posted by Svartmetall View Post
Oh whoops! Good grief that was a stupid error. When I lived in the UK I came into Euston so spent my life taking the Northern line... Will correct that in my post.
Haha it's ok, stock of that era looks fairly similar anyway!
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Old April 23rd, 2014, 04:03 PM   #3519
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Nice work at Old Street, it's the least user-friendly station in the network! It took me months to figure out which exit was the right one!
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Old April 23rd, 2014, 06:19 PM   #3520
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Official from TfL:

Quote:
http://www.tfl.gov.uk/info-for/media...stomer-service

Tube modernisation set to improve customer service
22 April 2014

LU’s proposals would see unparalleled levels of face-to-face customer service, as seen during the London 2012 Games
  • More staff than ever before visible and available rather than under-used ticket offices – turning public areas of stations into 'personalised customer service centres
  • Bearing down on transport fares made possible by modernising and improving transport while reducing overall cost
In an open letter to the millions of customers who use the Tube each day, Mike Brown, Managing Director of London Underground, today set out how LU's modernisation plans;
  • will radically improve customer service while bearing down on transport fares; and
  • guarantee fairness to all LU staff.
Under LU's proposals the public areas of stations - ticket halls, gate lines and platforms - will become personalised customer service centres, replicating the standards LU were able to offer during the London 2012 Games.Staff will be brought out from behind glass screens and hidden back offices to serve customers better.

Even More Staff Available To Help

Everything that customers can do at a ticket office window will be available to them more readily, with LU staff helping, at ticket machines, on-line or by telephone.

There will be even more staff available to help customers with disabilities.Given the success of Oyster and advances in on-line and ticket machine technology, the use of ticket offices has dramatically fallen.

Today, less than 3% of journeys involve a visit to a ticket office.

This trend is set to continue with the introduction of contactless bank card payment later this year.

When customers do use a ticket office, it is for three main reasons – to buy a ticket, fix a ticketing problem or get information.

By making more staff available in the public areas of stations – at ticket machines, gate lines and platforms – these services will be significantly improved for customers.

Safety And Security Will Never Be Compromised

Ticket office staff do not control safety and security - a dedicated Station Supervisor or a separate control room do that.

This will continue, and safety and security will never be compromised.

At the busiest stations – Euston, Heathrow, King’s Cross St Pancras, Liverpool Street, Paddington, Piccadilly Circus and Victoria, as well as at Gatwick Airport – new Visitor Information Centres (VICs) will ensure that those unfamiliar with the Tube, including tourists and visitors to London, are provided with the service and assistance they need.

VICs will also continue to sell tickets at these locations.

Under the proposals there is an overall reduction of 950 roles as a result of LU being able to deliver better customer service in a modern and efficient way.

However, it does not mean that 950 people physically need to leave.

Due to the 650 staff already wishing to leave under the generous voluntary redundancy arrangements, the need for an additional 200 staff for the new 24 hour service at weekends, existing vacancies and natural staff turnover, not a single member of staff is being forced to leave.

Savings Will Be Reinvested

The savings made in closing ticket offices - around 50 million pounds each year or 270 million pounds up to 2020/21 - will help to bear down on fares and will be reinvested in further improvements such as more frequent and reliable train services, air-conditioned trains and extending WiFi.

LU has made five commitments to customers:
  • All stations will remain staffed and controlled at all times, with more staff visible and available to help customers and keep them safe and secure
  • A new 24-hour service on core parts of the Tube network at weekends from 2015
  • More frequent and reliable train services with better, more accessible stations
  • Simpler ticketing, including contactless bank card payment with daily and weekly fares capping
  • The best possible value by running our services as efficiently as possible while improving customer service
Mike Brown said:

'Our proposals mean radically improved customer service while allowing us to bear down on the cost of transport fares.

We will be emulating the levels of face-to face customer service we gave during the 2012 Games, with more staff available in the public areas of stations to help and advise passengers and keep everyone safe.

'Ticket offices do not control the safety and security of stations.

Station supervisors and dedicated controls rooms do that, and this will continue.

Every station will remain staffed and controlled at all times, and new ticket machines, contactless payment and a 24 hour service at weekends will further improve life for our customers.'

'We cannot stand by and force customers to pay for ticket offices through their fares when a far better service can be provided more efficiently.

The Mayor was able to keep fare increases this year down to the rate of inflation as a result of our being able to modernise and improve London's transport while reducing our overall costs.

We want to continue doing so, helping us to further bear down on fares.'

During an intensive period of talks, spanning eight weeks and 40 meetings, LU made highly significant changes to its proposals to reflect the feedback of staff and unions, so that a Customer Service Supervisor will staff smaller, local stations at all times, no supervisors need reapply for jobs, all applications for voluntary redundancy will be honoured and we will look to ensure that no staff lose pay.

There will be no compulsory redundancies and there is a job for every member of staff who wants to be part of LU’s future and is willing to be flexible.

All four trades unions have been invited for further daily meetings with LU this week.

One union, the RMT, has demanded that all modernisation be stopped and have threatened strike action, having given no credible alternative suggestions to deal with a changing world.

Mike Brown added:

'We recognise that the strikes the RMT propose from next week will be hugely disruptive.

I hope that they can be averted - but that is up to the RMT.

The sensible thing to do is keep talking.

'If the strikes go ahead, we will work hard to provide the best service we possibly can.

Many of our staff will come in to work and we will also have our Travel Ambassadors out in force to offer help and advice.'
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