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Old November 17th, 2004, 04:33 PM   #41
ignoramus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Justme
^ woo, don't get too carried away here. Singapore, last I heard, just got their first subway system in 1990. That's some 130 years of so after London. It amazes us, that it took so long for Singapore to finally get a metro.

Obviously, when something is so new, and so small, it is alot easier to keep it modern.

Now, I think you are being a little picky with some of your points like

* for the "mind the gap" statements. Some of the earlier lines had stations built with curved platforms. There is a gap then at some points between the train and the platform. It would be impossible now to retunnel the underground and get straight plaforms. But let's be thankful. Many of those platforms were built so long before Singapore even dreamed of a subway, let alone nice straight modern platforms.

* Year, there are pickpockets in London. One of the problems with having such a free country, is that there is crime. I know is Singapore, you can get whipped for chewing chewing gum, but these things don't happen, thankfully in London. The downside is petty crime.

* As for the doors, yes, like most of northern Europe, even the most modern of trains, you have a button to open the doors. The principle here is to keep the draft out on cold wintery days on the above ground stations which you don't have in Singapore. Why open the door and let the cold wind in, if no one is entering or exiting the car?
Hey I ain't against London's Underground or anything. Don't make it seem that way. I am only amazed by the London Underground, at such a complex system, that cannot be found anywhere in Asia because the systems are relatively younger. So don't treat my post as one which critisizes the Underground, and neither should your post.

Singapore was only a small town 130 years ago in 1874. Its population was too small to support any subway system, if we had built it then we must have been crazy cause we have other issues far more important like poverty and housing.

And don't forget, 130 years ago Singapore was colonised by the British, so if its anyone who decided not to put in a subway, its them. No point blaming us.

Obviously when a system is new and small (80 Stations in total, Heavy and light rail) and by Asia's standards and relative to our size, it isnt that small at all.

And Singapore's first section of its metro line was opened in 1987, not 1990.

I was not being ''picky'' with the mind your gap announcements. I didnt even say that it was annoying or anything. I mentioned it because my friend said it sounded nice!!!

I didn't even say London had a lot of pickpockets, all I said was that there were a lot of posters. Thats an interesting discovery. I didnt say that meant it had a lot of or any pickpockets. Culture shock.

FOR YOUR INFORMATION, YOU DO NOT GET WHIPPED FOR chewing gum. The govt only bans the selling of gum, you can chew it here and bring it in for personal consumption.

And Singapore is a free country may I add.

Please please dont be hostile. I didnt intend to insult the Underground or anyone. After all this is a forum, one gets to know more about another country's system thru a forum and discuss about such things right. Hope you now know more about how Singapore really is, and that WE DONT WHIP people for chewing gum! Just as I now know why the Underground has buttons on doors.

I meant no insult. Please do not get the wrong idea okay!
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Old November 17th, 2004, 04:35 PM   #42
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ignoramus - I think you really ought to come to London to see for yourself. I think you'll be suprised of the difference between the MRT. If you don't go...you can't judge I say

The standards you speak of are also the standards that were started on the London Underground
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Old November 17th, 2004, 04:40 PM   #43
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I am just feeling a sense of culture shock cause these kinda stuff you dont see in Asia at all.

Who ever said I didnt like the Underground. I love it cause its very very extensive, and Singapore had always been looking to London when designing its rail system maps and in planning new lines. We dont even look to NY or Seoul which have extensive subway lines cause London's is the most extensive and we want to learn from your experiences.

If anyone came to Singapore they would see signs such as ''No Durians allowed'' and they may feel its a weird country. But if you understood youd realize that durians are very pungent and if brought on the trains the smell would circulate throughout the train cars.

So arent I entitled to find out more about something which is new to me? And clarify my doubts rather than simply assuming that the buttons on the doors are there because the engineers forgot how to make auto doors. wouldnt that be worse?
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Old November 17th, 2004, 04:41 PM   #44
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no worries mate, it just sounded like you were picking it for the sake of it. Sometimes it's hard to see what people really mean when reading just text.

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Old November 17th, 2004, 04:47 PM   #45
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Okay everyone please forget whatever was typed in the previous 4 or so posts. Total misunderstanding. Cleared now! Thank god!
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Old November 17th, 2004, 04:54 PM   #46
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The only thing I have against London is the terrible exchange rate. Scary. 1 pound equals 3.8 Singapore Dollars. Thats even more expensive that going to the US (US$1 equals S$1.68).

Most of my posts in here will be of the ''Is this true?'' type. Like how my friend upon arriving at Heathrow got bad service. Of course I doubt everyone gets bad service but is Heathrow's service bad (not against London or anything, tho sg's airport service is good, the service provided by our retailers are one of the worst in Asia) cause reviews so far have told of otherwise. But then again, I want to find out from a Londoner. I know its congested...

Last edited by ignoramus; November 17th, 2004 at 05:17 PM.
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Old November 17th, 2004, 05:22 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ignoramus
The only thing I have against London is the terrible exchange rate. Scary. 1 pound equals 3.8 Singapore Dollars. Thats even more expensive that going to the US (US$1 equals S$1.68).

Most of my posts in here will be of the ''Is this true?'' type. Like how my friend upon arriving at Heathrow got bad service. Of course I doubt everyone gets bad service but is Heathrow's service bad cause reviews so far have told of otherwise. But then again, I want to find out from a Londoner. I know its congested...
The exchange rate is pretty high for the pound, which does indeed cause a few concerns for people from other country's. But as you can imagine, this doesn't affect the average British person in their every day life... unless they travel to another country, which in return, for them is quite a bargin.

Heathrow is a very old and cramp airport. The new terminal will improve on things, and yes, service can get difficult because it is so crowded and cramp. Singapore airport is so much more spacious and more relaxed, and it does seem to work like clockwork (in fact, from what I saw, a lot of things work like clockwork in Singapore). Stansted is a smaller airport and is usually more relaxed than Heathrow.

They do try hard though to keep things running smoothly at Heathrow. I remember once I turned up too late to make my flight (missed the checkin by about 5minutes) and was told I would have to buy a new ticket (one of the problems with flying on the low cost fares). I told the lady kindly at the BA desk, that the reason I just missed the checkin was that I was given directions to the wrong terminal, and Heathrow was "oh so complicated". She put me on the next flight free of charge (which was incidently 30minutes later).

The rule there is to always smile, thank the staff, give them credit for their hard work, and ask kindly if they can help, and they always do then. Usually people abuse them to no end for their own mistakes. They yell and scream at them for things that are not their fault and so they always like to help a nice friendly customer with problems.

There's a show on TV here called airport which is a "fly on the wall" doc, showing the problems they have, and there was one incident during the 9/11 tragedy when all air traffic into Britain was stopped. It obviously wasn't the fault of the airlines, but when they told their customers that their flight was cancelled because of an air traffic shutdown, they were yelled and abused by the passengers, all screaming and waving their fists. I mean, the flight staff told them it was because of the twin towers being destroyed, planes hyjacked and thousands dead, but all they could care about was their holiday in Ibiza.

Mad...
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Old November 17th, 2004, 06:35 PM   #48
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N-T. You really like your underground and I am glad I got you all fired-up. No question about the place and importance of the Tube in history and please avoid snid comments about my knowledge of subway systems. But why can't they widen the tunnels?

Answer:
The Tube is already at full capacity and cannot sustain a closure of main lines
"Prohitively" expensive or costs outweigh the benefits

This is all off the top of my head, But....
Why couldn't they widen the tunnels piece by piece. Close down a section for the weekends, send in the boring machines and have it cleaned up for the Monday commute. I don't know how the underground deals with construction, and my referecne is based on Boston, where people are bused past closed down stations and in NYC where they re-route lines around construction. Of course, this would propably take many years, but I just don't think it should be so easily dismissed, especially on a site that also hosts a thread concerning a possible transrapid from Berlin to Greece.
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Old November 17th, 2004, 06:40 PM   #49
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@glickel, I don't know for sure, but I would assume that there are just so many tunnels already of the smaller diameter, that it would cost a fortune (and I mean a real fortune) to do this. How far could you re-bore a tunnel on a weekend before having it all cleaned up and working again Monday morning (keeping in mind you would probably have to remove (or partially remove) the boring machine each Sunday and replace it each Saturday.

Weekends are also very busy times still on the underground.

It would also cost an enormous amount of money, for a little extra head room. Not really value for money. It would be better spent building entire new lines into and out of London. You would then double capacity and it would be done quicker.

As for the transrapid between Berlin & Greece, that was really just one of those dreams that would never happen, not in a million years.
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Old November 17th, 2004, 08:29 PM   #50
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Every metro in Europe I've been on has buttons to open every single door. They don't open all the doors like they do in the trains in Asian metro systems.
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Old November 17th, 2004, 09:14 PM   #51
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agree but sorta disagree ... london tube is prob one of the best systems for its age and size ... its in my opinion much better maintained than new yorks ... from a tourist point of view the history and experience makes it a tourist attraction along with the routemasters and taxi ...

however in a commuter point of view i would pretty much preferred
the modern systems of like singapore or tokyo ...
which offers a great network for the size of the city
while being cleaner, more stable, newer and more efficient ...
those delay timetables at the tube can be quite annoying ...
It would be great if the LDN's tube, Par's metro can stopped to renovate
but that would pretty much to stop the two cities ...
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Old November 19th, 2004, 11:12 PM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glickel
This is all off the top of my head, But....
Why couldn't they widen the tunnels piece by piece. Close down a section for the weekends, send in the boring machines and have it cleaned up for the Monday commute. I don't know how the underground deals with construction, and my referecne is based on Boston, where people are bused past closed down stations and in NYC where they re-route lines around construction. Of course, this would propably take many years, but I just don't think it should be so easily dismissed, especially on a site that also hosts a thread concerning a possible transrapid from Berlin to Greece.
My question is... Why?

The Tube Lines (Victoria, Piccadilly, Northern, Jubilee, Central, Bakerloo, Waterloo & City) have functioned perfectly well for over 100 years in some cases... Why spend BILLIONS of pounds widening the tunnels because they feel a bit small to Tourists?

Of course if they were built today there'd be much wider tunnels, emergency walkways, ventilation shafts, air conditioning etc etc etc... but they weren't and ultimately they transport millions of passengers PER DAY without incident or accident. The busiest lines (Northern, Central) transport around 600,000 passengers EACH every day... to close the lines down in order to widen them for no real good reason would spew 600,000 people onto the buses and other lines every day.

Believe me, we aren't talking about shutting the line down on Friday Night and re-opening it on Monday morning... It would take MONTHS if not YEARS of continuous closure to re-bore each line; it would be easier to just build a new line to be honest.
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Old November 20th, 2004, 03:15 AM   #53
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If it aint broke, don't fix it!
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Old November 20th, 2004, 09:03 PM   #54
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Quote:
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If it aint broke, don't fix it!
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Old November 20th, 2004, 10:54 PM   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vertigo
Great thread! I remember that old stock on the Northern Line, it was indeed quite gloomy.

My favorite stock is the 1992 stock, with its large windows. Too bad they didn't keep that feature for the 1995/1996 stock.
I live on the central Line - the "old" trains you mention above were built in two batches - 1959 and 1962.

The 1959 batch went to the Piccadilly line, and after the 1975 trains were introduced were transfered to the Northern Line, although for a while they also worked on the Bakerloo Line.

The 1962 batch went to the Central Line. These were replaced by the 1992 trains, which are smoother & faster but have significantly fewer and less comfortable seats.

On outer sections of line where station distances are greater these trains take on a different character and really seem to fly - I understand they can exceed 60mph (approx 100kmh) - and yes, their higher speed is noticable (but in a good way as they ride well even at high speed). Its a shame that they can only really reach these speeds at a few locations.

One reason why they need to travel so fast is because the Epping branch is more akin to a country railway than an urban metro, and with the higher speeds they could shave 5 minutes off the timetable. Untill the late 1940's this route was operated by mainline steam trains, and even now beyond Debden you travel through green fields onto the country town of Epping, which, incidentally is well outside of the M25 Motorway ("freeway", in American English) which encircles London. Part of the Hainault loop also passes through green fields and if you happen to be looking at the right time you will even see a farm! Other views from the railway include people's back gardens - a few of which boast swimming pools. Especially the section between Roding Valley and Grange Hill.

Simon
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Old November 20th, 2004, 11:05 PM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by superchan7
The 1992 stock looks like Sci-fi. And the 1970s tube stock must've looked very impressive and futuristic back then. What a unique shape...too bad the ceiling height is so low! I kept hitting my head =(
London Underground has a lot of character, despite some of the cut/cover stock looking very old, like tin boxes (I have a thing against those New-York-style trains). Even though I'm more used to cutting-edge (bleeding edge?) systems like Hong Kong, I found myself wanting to ride the Underground as often as I could when I was in London this past summer.

Who makes the trains, by the way?

As a schoolboy travelling to school on the 1972 Mk1 and Mk11 trains on the Northern Line (these being more or less visually identical to the 1967 Victoria Line trains) I *very much* saw these trains as being *space age*. Even now they still retain that futuristic look. (in my eyes - I am 45)

I share your views on New York's Subway trains.

Simon
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Old November 20th, 2004, 11:18 PM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tubeman
Sadly London gets horrifically hot & humid every Summer without fail; there will always be spell or two / three of 30C+ (32 or 33C is typical) every year now, and Summer before last it reached 38C with very high humidity. Down on the un-airconditioned deep-level "tube" lines which are up to 80m below ground level it get ridiculously hot when its busy, you literally need a shower after getting off.

As you can tell from the photos in the first post, some trains are the size of normal overground trains (A, C and D Stocks) whilst the others are tiny in comparison (1967, 1972, 1973, 1992, 1995 & 1996 stocks)... I'll try and find a photo of two side by side to illustrate the huge difference.

The Metropolitan and District Lines were originally built as "proper" railways (they were steam-hauled) that happened to be largely in tunnel through central London. The Hammersmith & City, East London and Circle Lines are all essentially the product of these two companies (as well as the Metropolitan and District Lines, obviously). All five lines have tunnels large enough to accommodate mainline trains that lie just below street level; they were built by using the hugely disruptive "Cut and Cover" method where basically an enormous trench was dug for the railway which was then covered back up again (usually with a road). Therefore these trains are much larger than the "Tube" stocks and I personally see no good reason whatsoever why they can't have Air Conditioning installed as there are numerous gaps in the tunnel originally built to allow steam and smoke to escape from the steam engines... the heat from the Air Con units could escape here.

The "Tube" Lines came after the "Cut and Cover" Lines (from 1890 onwards) and are bored using a tunnelling machine (Greathead Shield), hence the round tunnels "Tubes" into which the trains pretty ingeniously fit. They have a tight diameter really just to minimise the amount of tunnelling required; excavating a bored tunnel to main line train dimensions would involve easily twice the volume of spoil. There are no ventilation shafts to speak of and the tunnels are hot enough as it is not to have trains running through with Air Con units belching out heat.

Tubeman,

I agree with your comments regarding air conditioning. I wish the (air-con) situation could be otherwise! At times its so hot down there that if it were animals being carried (and not humans) then the transport operator would be prosecuted for cruelty!!!

The 1992 stock on Central Line have additional fans which blow air behind the seated passengers but oh! are they noisy!!! Also, many people leave discarded newspapers over them - blocking the airflow.

But, in the winter these trains can be cold, especially because of the (in my view) silly ruling that all doors must be opened by the driver at outdoor stations. These trains were built with passenger door controls (pdc) - both to open and close the doors - and it is a source of great annoyance that London Underground management have now arbitarily decreed that these pdc must not be used - at the pain of a driver loosing their job, I understand. Esepcially in weather such as we are experiencing right now (its a cold, frosty evening) passengers would benefit very much from not having a blast of icy cold air at every open air station. The situation at termini is even worse, as trains will stand in the platform with all doors open whilst the driver walks to the other end of the platform and then sits in the cab whilst awaiting the correct departure time.

Of course its not your fault that this is the situation and please dont take my strong views personally.

btw, I know about the "selective door opening" system fiited to many other trains, which means that only one (or 2?) doors per car is left open at terminal stations - its a shame that the 1992 stock does not appear to have this too.

Simon

Last edited by spsmiler; November 21st, 2004 at 01:24 AM.
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Old November 21st, 2004, 01:19 AM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mad_nick
I can understand why they were building tiny tunnels in the 1890's, but why did they continue to build small tunnels on lines built later when it was actually possible to build larger ones?
Also, why are London trains so short? According to what I've read, the 6 car trains on cut & cover lines are about 300ft and tube 6 car trains are about 350 ft.
Consider that New York's IRT platforms, which are the shortest in the system, are about 525 ft long. (BMT platforms are 615 ft and IND are 660 ft)
Nick,

you ask a very good question regarding tunnel sizes.

As you surmise, the smaller "tube" tunnels were originally built from the 1890's, onwards.

The Victoria Line *should* have been built for larger trains - the original plans which were drawn up in the 1940's (during the war) were for it to be built for "full size" trains. Its my understanding the the treasury wanted economies. As a nation we could have afforded the larger tunnels but were not prepared to pay for them. Subsequent overcrowding on the Victoria line proved that this was a false economy.

As for other lines, well the only other "new" sections of Underground railway have been extensions to existing services. 1975 Piccadily Line to Heathrow Airport and 1979 Jubilee line both include sections of pre-existing "tube" railway.

As for train lengths, the Northern Line extensions built in the 1930's were designed for 9-car underground trains, and although some such trains did run they meant that at stations in central London the last two cars on a train remained in the tunnel! Because of WW2 the 9-car scheme was suspended never fully implemented. Nevertheless some stations still retain the longer station platforms - especially those which are below ground.

As for the sub-surface lines, well at one time trains were even shorter than they are now! Especially the Circle Line which used to feature 5 car trains! Actually though, the main section of the District Line did use 8 car trains during the rush hours (6 car at other times) but I understand that at some stations the trains only just fitted the platforms. Nowadays the line may use 6 car trains but in length these 6 cars are roughly similar to 7 older, shorter cars.

I agree that longer trains would be a good idea, especially for the C stock trains which for most of their area of operation use stations which could easily accept 7 or even 8 car trains. BUT, there is a serious constraint. The western side of the Circle Line has three stations (Bayswater, Notting Hill Gate and Paddington) with shorter platforms, and here the maximum train length is 6 cars! Otherwise the trains probabaly would be longer... These stations are used by C stock trains running on the Circle Line and the District Line's Edgware Road - Wimbledon service. Similar trains also run on the hammersmith & City line between Hammersmith (Met) and Whitechapel / Barking via Baker Street.

Of course extending the station platforms would be the optimum solution - it would significantly benefit much of the routes served by the C stock trains - and probably if the money was available this would be done. As ever, money (or lack of) is the primary issue. Funding is a minefield of a topic, it could even be extended to include the Iraqi situation (the cost of our troops being out there) but its not a topic I intend to discuss in great detail here. Suffice to say that when money was more easily available the government put it into roads and when the local authority known as "The City of London" (it covers the square mile in the heart of the financial area) said it wanted to invest money to improve Bank station (it was in an appalling mess at the time) the national Government threatened severe financial sanctions - not only if they did this but even if they "went public" with that information.

Simon

(information source - a "Q&A" talk where a former Lord Mayor of London was the guest).
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Old January 2nd, 2005, 10:55 PM   #59
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LONDON | DLR, Underground, Tramlink

London Underground

Station Upgrades

Kings Cross St Pancras Tube Station Western Ticket Hall

Opened: 28th of May, 2006.

This was built to cope with the extra demand placed on the Tube station due to the opening of a new Eurostar services from Kings Cross St Pancras. This ticket hall primarily serves the Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan sub-surface lines.

The ticket hall is of cut-and-cover construction underneath part of the historic St Pancras station, and therefore there is a contrast between the red bricked mainline station and the modern white and glass finishes of the new ticket hall. The ticket hall also lead to the opening of a new street entrances for the tube station on the busy Euston Road. The ticket hall is connected to the refurbished St Pancras station via brick arches, and to the original main ticket hall of the tube station (which itself has been refurbished and has new entrances) via a new passageway, all of which is protected from the elements. Passengers enter the refurbished platforms through ticket gates, down stairs on both sides and then enter a spacious area between the platforms. Additionally, there are lifts for the disabled and those with children and shopping.

New Main Ticket Hall Entrances:

freakmarky at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


New Western Ticket Hall Entrances:

Last Rounds at Flickr
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Kake Pugh at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


New London Underground Western Ticket Hall:

image hosted on flickr


James Cridland at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


Refurbished Sub-Surface platforms:

image hosted on flickr


Heathrow Terminal 5 Station

Opened: 27th of March, 2008.

This station was built to serve the brand new Heathrow Terminal 5, providing connections direct into Central London on the Piccadilly line and Heathrow Express/Connect services.

The station is shared between the two different services, but they are clearly divided by a glass wall. There are two terminating platforms for Heathrow Express/Connect, and two platforms for the Piccadilly line (one exiting, the other alighting). The station is connected to terminal 5 through a deep glass concourse with escalators and lifts. It was built and funded by BAA, therefore it is not staffed by LU but by airport staff themselves.

Piccadilly line Ticket hall:

image hosted on flickr


Piccadilly line platforms:

image hosted on flickr


Shepherd's Bush Tube Station

Opened: 5th of October, 2008.

This station originally opened in 1900. This station had been in a bad state for many years, it was dark and dingy at platform level, had poor access for disabled and the ticket hall was cramped. When plans for Westfield came to fruition it became clear that the station needed to be expanded. TfL said that the escalators needed to be replaced as they were at the end of their life cycle, and they should be replaced before the new shopping centre opens this year. So it was decided to close the station for eight months and at the same time carry out the comprehensive refurbishment.

The refurbished station features a tall glass ticket hall (again, rather uninspiring) with a large entrance opening out onto the shopping centre and the Overground station, and a rather small entrance opening out onto the local area... There are new escalators (that don't sound or look particularly new), that lead to a re-tiled tunnel onto the (also re-tiled) platforms. The tunnels and platforms are tiled in boring white tiles that harp back to the CLR (Central London Railway) days of the Central line, where there were plain white tiles at every station. A video onboard a westbound train entering the station, and then views of the platforms and ticket hall can be found here.

Old entrance:

image hosted on flickr


Old platforms:

image hosted on flickr


New street entrance:

image hosted on flickr


New main entrance:

image hosted on flickr


New ticket hall:

image hosted on flickr


New escalators:

image hosted on flickr


Re-tiled passageways:

image hosted on flickr


Still unfinished platform:

image hosted on flickr


Wood Lane Tube Station

Opened: 12th of October, 2008.

Another station opened to service the Westfield Shopping Centre. It is located on the Hammersmith & City line between Shepherd's Bush Market and Latimer Road. It is the first LU station to not have any staffed ticket facilities. I don't know who it was funded by.

The station was designed by Ian Ritchie Architects (the same person who designed Bermondsey tube station) and is located only 250m away from White City Central line station. It features a large ticket hall with mustard coloured shiny panels on the ceilings. Once passing through the ticket gates, there are stairs on the left to the eastbound platforms. To get to the westbound platforms, passengers must pass underneath the brick arches that support the tracks, the ceiling here also has metallic mustard coloured panels. The platforms are side platforms (like most over ground stations on LU) and are unpolished and metallic. They feature windows every once in a while that give an outside view.

Entrance:

image hosted on flickr


Ticket hall:

image hosted on flickr


Stairs to eastbound platform:

image hosted on flickr


Underpass to westbound platform:

image hosted on flickr


Platforms:

image hosted on flickr


Kings Cross St Pancras Tube Station Northern Ticket Hall

Opened: 29th of November, 2009.

A new 'Tube ticket hall' was opened on the 29th of November providing direct access from the new section of St Pancras which houses the Thameslink, Midland Mainline, and Ebbsfleet (future Javelin) services to the deep level underground lines (Northern, Piccadilly, Victoria). It also provides quick access to the new Kings Cross concourse set to open in the future.

The new ticket hall is in a similar style to the aforementioned sub-surface ticket hall and features a bank of four escalators leading to new deep level passageways to the deep level lines. The passageways link to the opposite end of the platform to the current passageways meaning the platforms will be more evenly loaded. These new ticket halls mean that Kings Cross now has 4 ticket halls for the tube station alone, double what it had before the works started.

New 'tube' ticket hall:

alicephilippa at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


New escalators:

alicephilippa at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


tompagenet at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


New passageways to deep level lines:

alicephilippa at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


alexbrn at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


Train Updates

New Victoria line Trains (London Underground 2009 Stock)

First Passenger Journey: 21st July, 2009.

These trains are needed to replace the current 1967 Stock, which as the name implies, are 40 years old and are the oldest deep level trains in service on LU. The new 8-car trains have better acceleration and braking, are longer (only by 3m), wider (making them the widest "tube" trains), and slightly faster. This, along with a more up-to-date ATO (Automatic Train Operation) system, will allow the Victoria line to carry 20% more passengers than present. The trains also feature better forced ventilation, facilities for the disabled and passenger information. The interior is typical of LU with moquette fabric over cushioned seats, coloured poles, everything is colour coordinated with the line colour (light blue). The first train has began passenger service for evaluation, but they have not properly entered service yet.

Current trains (London Underground 1967 Stock)

Exterior

bloophoenix at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


Interior

inglian at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


Video



New trains (London Underground 2009 Stock)

Exterior

CHURCHHILL at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


Interior

darquati at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


Video



Flickr video, not sure how to embed...

Other miscellaneous LU shots:























Canary Wharf










Pictures of the Tube taken from the 'Best Subway' thread. All of these were taken from flickr, after trawling through hundreds of photos to find the best ones. I should really ask for permission first, but if anyone asks me to take them down then I will. I'm putting these here because it took me a while to get them all, and I want to revive this thread!

Pre-1900 sub-surface stations (Circle, East London, District, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines, i.e. the Sub Surface Network, there are however pre-1900 overground 'tube line' stations, these are as a result of existing railway takeovers or line swapping.)

Baker Street, Circle and Hammersmith and City lines platforms:

image hosted on flickr


Great Portland Street:

image hosted on flickr


Notting Hill Gate, Circle and District lines platforms:

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Farringdon, Circle, Hammersmith and City and Metropolitan lines platforms to the right, First Capital Connect Thameslink service to the left:

image hosted on flickr


South Kensington Circle and District lines platform:

image hosted on flickr


Earl's Court District line platforms:

image hosted on flickr


Paddington:

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Embankment:

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Barons Court:

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Many pre-1900 suburban stations have these 'country cottage' type of entrances, some of which are left over from existing railway take-overs, they look 'cottagey' perhaps because when they were built many of them were in the countryside!

Southfields:

image hosted on flickr


Stepney Green:

image hosted on flickr


Walthamstow Central:

image hosted on flickr


The platforms usually have an 'upside down picket fence' type of roof as their distinguishing feature.

Woodside Park:

image hosted on flickr


Barons Court:

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Barkingside:

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Two of the few surviving C&SLR (City and South London Railway, now the Northern line's Bank branch). The first section opened in 1890 and was the first deep level railway in the world, however, the Tower Subway and Thames Tunnel could both be thought of as railways, the Tower Subway was cable hauled, and the Thames Tunnel wasn't originally intended to be a railway tunnel, being converted in the 1860s. The Thames Tunnel was also just a section of the East London Railway (now East London line) whereas the C&SLR was entirely in deep bore tunnels. The C&SLR tunnels are not original, as they were widened in the 1920s. The C&SLR was also one of the first railways in the world to use electric traction. C&SLR stations had plain white tiling on the platforms with a brown band legnthways, none of this tiling remains.

Original narrow island platforms, only two stations are still like this on the network:

Clapham Common:

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Kennington:

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Clapham Common:

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Waterloo station on the Waterloo & City line (originally London and South Western Railway) it was opened in 1898, noticeable in being a cut-and-cover station on a 'tube' line, the rest of the line is deep level. This isn't the original decor:

image hosted on flickr


Central London Railway stations, built around 1900. The platforms, like the C&SLR, had plain white tiling. It is now the Central line.

Lancaster Gate:

image hosted on flickr


Queensway:

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Charles Yerks station (Bakerloo, Piccadilly and Northern (Charing Cross branch) lines) Designed by Leslie Green. Most of these were made between 1900-1910. The entrances have distinctive 'ox-blood' tiling for the entrances, and the platforms have unique tile patterns which differ for every station, many of which were unfortunately replaced in the 80s-90s... See below.

Arsenal:

image hosted on flickr


Chalk Farm:

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Russell Square:

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Holloway Road:

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Holloway Road:

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Covent Garden:

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Chalk Farm:

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Belsize Park:

image hosted on flickr


Lambeth North:

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1910-1920s stations on the Bakerloo's extention to Queen's Park and the Northern line's extension from Golder's Green to Edgware designed by Stanley A Heaps.

Edgware:

image hosted on flickr


Hendon Central:

image hosted on flickr


This is a continuation of the Leslie Green stations and is therefore based on them

Maida Vale:

image hosted on flickr


Charles Holden art deco stations 1920s-1940s, there are Charles Holden stations on most lines. Some of his stations are reconstructions of existing Central London stations for the equipping of escalators, as all deep level stations were built before escalators were even invented and required lifts and a spiral staircase for emergencies. The rest of his work was reconstructions of suburban overground stations, and brand new suburban stations to encourage development.

Clapham South:

image hosted on flickr


Wood Green:

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Oakwood:

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Cockfosters:

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East Finchley:

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Harrow-on-the-Hill:

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Kilburn:

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Tooting Bec:

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St James' Park:

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Ealing Common:

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Oakwood:

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Cockfosters:

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Chiswick Park:

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Northfields:

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Art deco escalator lamps, they were first on the Tube in the late twenties, most of them were unfortunately ripped out along with the wooden escalators after the King's Cross Fire in 1987, but a handful remain.

Southgate:

image hosted on flickr


Contemporary version, the originals were brown:

image hosted on flickr


This station was modelled on the Moscow Metro after Holden visited it in the 40s.

Gants Hill:

image hosted on flickr


1950-1960s stations, these are both reconstructions.

Moorgate:

image hosted on flickr


Euston Square:

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1960s-1970s stations (Victoria line) Each station has a unique motif in the wall recesses behind the benches. Some of them are a bit naff and literal, for example, Brixton has a tonne of bricks as it's motif... Other than that the platforms are practically identical, except for updates over the years: Oxford Circus and Victoria both had their tiles replaced with something just as bland and Oxford Circus and Green Park both no longer have their original motifs... See all the motifs here.

Walthamstow Central:

image hosted on flickr


Green Park, Victoria line platform:

image hosted on flickr


Finsbury Park:

image hosted on flickr


Stockwell:

image hosted on flickr


1970s-1980s stations (Piccadilly line between Hounslow West and Heathrow Airport, and Jubilee line between Baker Street and Green Park)

Green Park Jubilee line platform:

image hosted on flickr


Baker Street Jubilee line platform:

image hosted on flickr


Hatton Cross:

image hosted on flickr


1980s-1990s stations (most of them are not original designs, most of them are in Central London, unfortunately)

Euston Northern line (Charing Cross branch) platform:

image hosted on flickr


Angel:

image hosted on flickr


Green Park Piccadilly line platform:

image hosted on flickr


Charing Cross Bakerloo line platform:

image hosted on flickr


Baker Street Bakerloo line platform:

image hosted on flickr


21st century stations (Mostly Jubilee line between Westminster and Stratford but some old stations that have been modernised in 21st century style)

Waterloo Jubilee line platform:

image hosted on flickr


London Bridge Jubilee line platform:

image hosted on flickr


Bermondsey:

image hosted on flickr


Southwark:

image hosted on flickr


North Greenwich:

image hosted on flickr


Southwark:

image hosted on flickr


Bermondsey:

image hosted on flickr


Canary Wharf:

image hosted on flickr


Elephant & Castle:

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Finsbury Park:

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Brixton:

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Last but not least, the trains, the interior decor is usually based on the line's colour, though there are some exceptions because of the Disability Discrimination Act...

Bakerloo line 1972 Stock = 7 short cars

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Central line 1992 Stock = 8 short cars

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Circle/Hammersmith & City/District (Edgware Road - Wimbledon) C Stock = 6 short cars

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


District line D Stock = 6 long cars

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


Metropolitan line A Stock, Metropolitan = 8 short cars

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


Jubilee line 1996 Stock = 7 long cars

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


Northern line 1995 Stock = 6 long cars (externally identical to 1996 Stock)

image hosted on flickr


Piccadilly line 1973 Stock = 6 long cars

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


Victoria line 1967 Stock = 8 short cars (externally identical to the 1972 Stock)

image hosted on flickr


Waterloo & City line 1992 Stock = 4 short cars (externally identical to the 1992 Stock)

image hosted on flickr


Victoria line 2009 Stock, entered service in 2009 to replace the 1967 Stock. It'll be 8 slightly longer cars. These trains will be slightly (only slightly) larger than existing Tube stock as the Victoria line has slightly larger tunnels, they were built larger as the sixties planners thought that this would reduce air resistance.

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


Sub-Surface line Stock (Circle, District, Hammersmith and City and Metropolitan lines) Circle, District Hammersmith & City lines will become 7 short cars (The Circle and Hammersmith and City are 6 short cars, the District 6 long cars, so it'll be the same for the District) Metropolitan will remaine as 8 short cars. These trains will feature air-conditioning and inter-connecting gangways, like Paris Metro line 1. As the Sub-surface lines were built for steam trains, there are sections for the hot air to be expelled. They are expected to enter service in 2010 on the Metropolitan, replacing the much-loved A Stock:

image hosted on flickr


The S Stock ran for the first time in passenger service on Saturday 31st July 2010... here's my write up.

New Sub-Surface lines Trains (London Underground S Stock)

First Passenger Journey: 31st of July, 2010.

As the A Stock on the Metropolitan line is now 50 years old, new rolling stock is desperately needed. The capacity of the Metropolitan line (and to a lesser effect the rest of the Sub Surface network) is currently limited by old signalling and old trains with low performance (bad acceleration/decceleration). The trains are 8 cars long for the Metropolitan line, and 7 cars long for the rest of the SS network, they are known as S8 Stock and S7 Stock respectively. This means that on the Cicle and Hammersmith & City lines there will be an increase in capacity, as the existing stock is 6 cars long platforms at stations on the western side of the H&C/Circle lines will either be lengthened or selective door operation will be used. The seating layout also differs for the Metropolitan line trains, it will be half transverse and half longitudinal which suits the more commuter-rail-like nature of the line. The 7 car trains for the rest of the SS network will be all longitudinal. These trains are the first on the network to be fully walkthrough, and are also the first to have full air-conditioning. Air-conditioning is possible on the SS network as the tunnels were originally designed with several gaps located in cuttings which allowed the original steam-powered trains to gases. They will also feature 1.3m/s/s acceleration and have a top speed of 62mph/100km/h. The trains will enter service with manual operation on the existing signalling and eventually modern signalling will replace it, taking advantage of the train's increased performance. The total amount of trains will be 191, trains will enter service on the Metropolitan first, then the Circle/Hammersmith & City, and then the District. This is because the District has the most modern rolling stock, which has recently been refurbished.

Current trains (London Underground A Stock)

Exterior

AndrewHA ! at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


Kurt Raschke at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


Interior

stephenk1977 at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


Video





New trains (London Underground 'S8' Stock)

Exterior

Justin Foulger at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


londonstuff at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


Interior

londonstuff at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


londonstuff at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


Video



And finally, something I thought was interesting...

Difference in size between the Sub-Surface Stock and the Tube Stock, it's the Piccadilly line 1973 Stock and Metropolitan line A Stock side by side on the Uxbridge branch:

image hosted on flickr


DLR

New DLR Platforms at Stratford

Opened: 18th of June, 2007.

These were needed as the original platform (built when the DLR was first constructed) had insufficient capacity (both in terms of train movements and passenger throughput), was unprotected from the elements, had poor interchange with the Jubilee line and London Overground, and was unable to accommodate 3 car units.

The new platforms have an interesting zig-zag roof with multi-coloured columns, along with a bare metal zig-zag footbridge to the main concourse. There are also 'spotlights' on the floor which look cool at night!

Old platforms (to the left):

image hosted on flickr


New footbridge to the main concourse:

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


New platforms:

image hosted on flickr


Langdon Park DLR Station

Opened: 9th of December, 2007.

This was built simply to service the local area as there was a long gap between Devons Road and All Saints which was safeguarded for a station in between. Some local development company funded it along with Docklands Light Railway Limited.

Like most DLR stations, it is unstaffed with no ticket gates. It features rather bland platforms with a bizarrely shaped 'surfboard' roof on top of the overbridge.

Entrance:

image hosted on flickr


Platforms:

image hosted on flickr


Woolwich Arsenal DLR Extension

Opened: 10th of January, 2009.

A brand new extension and station designed to serve the local area. This is an extension off of the existing London City Airport branch of the DLR which had opened in December 2005. What had made the DLR so cost effective in the past is extending the system gradually and in small stages, meaning that if something were to go wrong, less would be at stake than if they had done larger more headline grabbing extensions. Hence why the extension to Woolwich Arsenal opened in two stages, first to King George V (2005) and then now to Woolwich Arsenal.

After leaving King George V to the east, the line dives underground to pass beneath the Thames in twin tube tunnels, the route takes more than a 90 degree turn under the thames and arrives at Woolwich Arsenal pointing westwards. Just after exiting the tunnel under the Thames, there is a cutting with a scissors crossover, the route then turns a sharp right into the subterranean station. A video of the route from London City Airport, past King George V and under the Thames into Woolwich Arsenal can be viewed here. There is also a diagram of the route here.

Woolwich Arsenal provides interchange with NR (National Rail) services to Kent and to Central London. There are three ticket halls. One is the original ticket hall which is solely for NR. Another new ticket hall just next to it serves the DLR only and is there to serve local bus routes. This ticket hall (Town Centre) features a garish wall mural of random objects, there are escalators straight down to the platforms from here. The last ticket hall (Woolwich New Road) serves the town centre and is for NR and DLR. Once entering the ticket hall, passengers go down a level for NR, or down a second level to the DLR. The DLR station has an island platform with sparse decoration. As with all new stations, there are lifts for the disabled.

Town Centre entrance:

image hosted on flickr


Town Centre ticket hall mural:

image hosted on flickr


Escalators down to platform:

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Woolwich New Road entrance:

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Platform with (new) train:

image hosted on flickr


Platforms:

image hosted on flickr


Tower Gateway DLR Station

Opened: 2nd of March, 2009.

The original station at Tower Gateway was built in 1987 on the original DLR route. It was the most Central and the most western station on the DLR at that time. As with most DLR stations built at that time, it was built on the cheap, with a simple island platform, sparse decoration and little shelter. The importance of this station decreased when the branch to Bank was built in 1991. However, in recent years the DLR has become more and more crowded, and the station has become dangerously overcrowded. This, along with the desire to extend the platforms to allow 3 car trains, were the reasons to re-build the station from a single narrow island platform with two tracks on either side, to a more capacious single track terminus. This layout allows passengers to exit and enter the train at the same time, reducing dwell times.

The stations consists of a single ticket hall (or circulation area, as most DLR stations have no ticket gates!) it remains painted in the original DLR blue and is of tacky 80s design... Passengers then travel either up stairs, lifts or one of the two escalators to the elevated platforms. There is another small circulation area where passengers can buy snacks from the small shop. Passengers make a right turn and facing them is the platform. The platform is in a 'horse shoe' shape and is long enough for 3 car DLR units. Passengers exit and enter on opposite sides, the doors opening on both sides. It features plain grey painted metal and windows opening on to the adjacent tracks from Fenchurch Street NR station, or on the opposite side, to the streetscape. The centre, where the train alights, is open to the elements, but the platforms are nearly completely sheltered.

Old platforms:

image hosted on flickr


Refurbished 'Ticket Hall':

image hosted on flickr


Escalators and stairs to new platforms:

image hosted on flickr


Platform with train, showing the NR tracks in the background:

image hosted on flickr


New South Quay DLR Station

Opened: 26th of October, 2009.

This station was needed as the DLR is increasing it's standard train legnth from two articulated units, to three. The old South Quay station was built in the middle of two tight curves, therefore the platforms could not be extended to accomodate 3 car units. It was decided to build a new station east of the old station that could accomodate three car units.

The new station is elevated straddles the harbour, with entrances at both sides and the harbour in between. It is 125m to the east of the old station. Like most DLR stations, it does not have ticket barriers therefore passengers simply touch in with their oyster cads on one of the readers, and then get a lift or stairs/escalators to platform level. The platforms are of standard DLR and the cladding alternates between grey metal and glass. It is one of the first DLR stations to feature DLR roundels mounted on poles.

Old station entrance:

Kake Pugh at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


Old station platforms:

johnny1989b at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


New station main entrance:

IanVisits at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


New station platforms:

IanVisits at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


Platforms from afar:

kpmarek at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


Train Updates

New DLR Trains (B07/09 Stock)

First Passenger Journey: September 2008

Manufacturers Bombardier considered these trains as superior to the current trains in use on the DLR and were therefore ordered to run in 3-car sets on extended (from 2-car sets) sections of the DLR. They are not replacements for the current stock but are instead used to boost the capacity of the system. Features include: improved internal design, with larger windows and doors, improved acceleration/braking and superior safety amenities. The interiors generally look similar to the current stock so they blend in.

Current trains (B90/B92/B2K Stock)

Exterior

bvohra at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


Video





New Trains (B07/09 Stock)

Exterior

darquati at Flickr
image hosted on flickr


Interior


IanVisits at Flickr

image hosted on flickr


Video

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Last edited by Tubeman; August 2nd, 2010 at 10:13 PM.
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Old January 2nd, 2005, 11:56 PM   #60
Vertigo
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Great pics. Londen Underground is certainly one of the most interesting metro systems in the world. It's the world's oldest, one of the most extensive and the tube lines are very typical due to their narrow profile... The extended Jubilee Line is an awesome extension to the network.
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