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Old June 23rd, 2014, 06:20 AM   #181
Jasper90
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I already know most things that are discussed here but this thread never ceases to amuse me...

One question: how does a true venetian (mestre and marghera are just like normal cities) learn to ride a bike? Do your parents take you to Parco San Giuliano or Lido when you're a child and let you practice?

from Chioggia to Punta Sabbioni via bike (and ferries). Easily one of the most interesting bike routes in the world. The smell of fresh mussels...
Hi! Thank you for following this thread, it's very important to me and I'm happy if it's appreciated

That's a good question. Unline normal bikes, tiny children's bikes are tolerated in Venice, as long as you don't disturb other people.
So, when I was 5 years old, I used to go to Campo San Polo with my grandparents. It's the second largest square in Venice after St Mark's Square. There are two pictures at the end.

I spent my afternoons wandering around the square in circles, with my bike with training wheels, and that's where I've learnt
Then I've learnt it better when I was older at my grandma's house in her hometown, a small town in the countryside between Treviso and Belluno, and later on the mountains.

I'd say that most Venetians either learn on the mountains/relatives' houses or in Lido, by renting a bike for the summer. Otherwise, they learn like I did in Venice as a kid.

Of course, when I moved to Milan, I had to learn all the street rules associated with riding the bike in a city. But I had already learned a lot when I got my driver's license


Campo San Polo di Lisa&Yo, su Flickr


Venedig 2010-307 di ollidrolli, su Flickr
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Old July 6th, 2014, 05:12 PM   #182
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One question: is it forbidden to load your bike on a A.CheTeVenio lines -say from Piazzale Roma to Lido through Canal Grande?

I don't remember the exact number of this line, probably 82 or something like that.

It might be cheaper and for sure way more exciting than a ferry through the Giudecca Canal.
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Old July 6th, 2014, 08:53 PM   #183
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Nice thread.

One can also see interesting footage of the canals and bridges in the 1943 Munchausen film.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LqLe9xNaYZM
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Old July 7th, 2014, 07:21 AM   #184
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Originally Posted by Fab87 View Post
One question: is it forbidden to load your bike on a A.CheTeVenio lines -say from Piazzale Roma to Lido through Canal Grande?

I don't remember the exact number of this line, probably 82 or something like that.

It might be cheaper and for sure way more exciting than a ferry through the Giudecca Canal.
Hi!
Thank you for asking. Bike transport in waterbuses isn't forbidden, but not even always allowed. It's basically a decision of the crew (driver + "sailor" who moors the waterbus at every stop), according to how much space there is.
The lines going through Grand Canal are 1 (slow lines, stops at every stop) and 2 (former 82, recently renamed, which goes express with only the most important stops). I'll make an extensive post about public transport in Venice soon, now that they're recently finished re-organizing it

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Nice thread.

One can also see interesting footage of the canals and bridges in the 1943 Munchausen film.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LqLe9xNaYZM
Thank you for sharing
It's interesting to note that almost everything is exactly identical now, as it was in 1943. I've spotted only a few very tiny details that changed, in addition to the fact that traffic has increased a lot.

I'm going to share this video in the Italian thread on historic pictures of Venice!
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Old July 29th, 2014, 07:32 AM   #185
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Is Venetian nationalism really that strong in the Veneto region? I have read that many Venetians want to secede from Italy. What is the perception of most people there? Do they feel Italian or do they feel Venetian (or both)? And what is your personal opinion?
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Old July 29th, 2014, 03:17 PM   #186
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Is Venetian nationalism really that strong in the Veneto region? I have read that many Venetians want to secede from Italy. What is the perception of most people there? Do they feel Italian or do they feel Venetian (or both)? And what is your personal opinion?
Hello Carlos. Unfortunately, as in other languages, English uses the same word Venetian to indicate the inhabitants of Venice (city) and of Veneto (region): independentist movement refers to the whole region (and some surrounding area), not just the city. It means almost 5million people, versus 250,000, for a quick comparison. If we say Venet, we might indicate region inhabitants in a better way.
Giving you my experience, I think that independence feeling is weaker in the main hurban areas, like Venice and Padua: but for "weak" I mean anyway a 30-40% of population. It can be really stronger, instead, in other parts of the region, like the north plain or the south-west plain, where (town by town) it can range between 60% and 80%. Moreover, the lack of medium or big cities in these areas, does not mean that they are underpopulated: actually, e.g. north plain is one of the most densely populated and richest areas. Polls indicate the independence support to be between 45% and 50% of voting population, with a projection of 55-60% of "yes" votes in a future referendum.
The fact is that the entire independence question is not so easy. It has not to be misunderstood with Lega Nord political party, which anyway is one of the "sponsor" of the official independence referendum (approved by Regional Council in Venice, about one month ago); but the unofficial, on-line referendum held in March, was organised and financed by a small political group with private funds.
Common people and enterpreneurs are often splitted about this issue. There is a widespread sense of Italy being at least composed of two different nations, North and South, and this feeling ranges from left to right, from cities to the countryside: but only a minority votes for Lega Nord, often seen as a populist, xenophobic party in the Parliament (it is not always true, but let's assume it). Only a part of them, anyway, think that they would feel better outside Italy, or even that they are not Italian at all. A mix of reasons may lead to this: historical, cultural and social reasons of course; but mainly "economical" reasons, that is to say the wish to live in a state with lower taxes, controlled expenses, better laws, less corruption and less bureaucracy than Italy, and with a strong support for private properties and enterprises. I think also that, despite a noisy minority, most part of "independentist" among common people look toward Europe, and not toward regional isolationism: Italy is then felt also as a small, provincial country.
Finally, you have to think that Italy is not formed from the union of different nations like United Kingdom, nor it is a united country in the sense of France: Italian regions often did not share common history until 1859-1866, nor common development until now; this may lead to strong feelings (in some region) of belonging more to a local, rather than a national community. I think that German concepts of heimat and vaterland might help: for most part of Venets, heimat is of course Veneto, which is not itself in contrast with being Italians; but, for a growing number of Venets, Italy is no more recognised as vaterland, which could be e.g. a common European space.
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Old July 29th, 2014, 04:18 PM   #187
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Here's the reason to ask what I wanted to: about Venetian language.
How far is it different from the official Italian (tuscan?)
According Venetians it is a proper language.

According the rest of Italians it is one of the most intelligible dialects of Italy

Nice thread, jasper.
I just found out it
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Old July 29th, 2014, 05:32 PM   #188
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Is Venetian nationalism really that strong in the Veneto region? I have read that many Venetians want to secede from Italy. What is the perception of most people there? Do they feel Italian or do they feel Venetian (or both)? And what is your personal opinion?


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Originally Posted by FilTur View Post
Hello Carlos. Unfortunately, as in other languages, English uses the same word Venetian to indicate the inhabitants of Venice (city) and of Veneto (region): independentist movement refers to the whole region (and some surrounding area), not just the city. It means almost 5million people, versus 250,000, for a quick comparison. If we say Venet, we might indicate region inhabitants in a better way.
Giving you my experience, I think that independence feeling is weaker in the main hurban areas, like Venice and Padua: but for "weak" I mean anyway a 30-40% of population. It can be really stronger, instead, in other parts of the region, like the north plain or the south-west plain, where (town by town) it can range between 60% and 80%. Moreover, the lack of medium or big cities in these areas, does not mean that they are underpopulated: actually, e.g. north plain is one of the most densely populated and richest areas. Polls indicate the independence support to be between 45% and 50% of voting population, with a projection of 55-60% of "yes" votes in a future referendum.
The fact is that the entire independence question is not so easy. It has not to be misunderstood with Lega Nord political party, which anyway is one of the "sponsor" of the official independence referendum (approved by Regional Council in Venice, about one month ago); but the unofficial, on-line referendum held in March, was organised and financed by a small political group with private funds.
Common people and enterpreneurs are often splitted about this issue. There is a widespread sense of Italy being at least composed of two different nations, North and South, and this feeling ranges from left to right, from cities to the countryside: but only a minority votes for Lega Nord, often seen as a populist, xenophobic party in the Parliament (it is not always true, but let's assume it). Only a part of them, anyway, think that they would feel better outside Italy, or even that they are not Italian at all. A mix of reasons may lead to this: historical, cultural and social reasons of course; but mainly "economical" reasons, that is to say the wish to live in a state with lower taxes, controlled expenses, better laws, less corruption and less bureaucracy than Italy, and with a strong support for private properties and enterprises. I think also that, despite a noisy minority, most part of "independentist" among common people look toward Europe, and not toward regional isolationism: Italy is then felt also as a small, provincial country.
Finally, you have to think that Italy is not formed from the union of different nations like United Kingdom, nor it is a united country in the sense of France: Italian regions often did not share common history until 1859-1866, nor common development until now; this may lead to strong feelings (in some region) of belonging more to a local, rather than a national community. I think that German concepts of heimat and vaterland might help: for most part of Venets, heimat is of course Veneto, which is not itself in contrast with being Italians; but, for a growing number of Venets, Italy is no more recognised as vaterland, which could be e.g. a common European space.
Hi and thank you guys for your question and answer
I only agree with a part of FilTur's analysis, so I'll first give my general opinion and then answer to some points of his post. I'll use the word Veneti to refer to inhabitants of Veneto.

The question is kinda controversial, in fact there are thousands of pages in the Italian forum about it. However, this is my feeling:

1) Italy has a huge variety of culture, traditions, languages and so on. Every region has its own peculiarities, as a result of the division which lasted until 1861 and later (Veneto 1866, Rome 1870, Trentino-South Tyrol and Trieste in 1918), as said by FilTur. This is a huge richness that doesn't mean division, and makes Italy even a greater place to me.

2) Veneto surely has its own peculiarities, and they're more than in most of the other areas of Italy. People from Veneto are conscious about that and they're very protective, with regards to Venetian language and culture. A lot of Veneti (and this includes me) think that Italy isn't doing enough to give the right value to it.
For example, most of Veneti are bilingual: they speak Italian for official purposes, and Italian, Venetian or a mixture of both when speaking in family or with friends. However, without the adequate measures for protection, this language will be extinct in 1 or 2 generations.

3) A lot of Italians are totally dissatisfied on how the Italian state works. They feel the administration as a separate entity, like if it was an enemy imposed from above, and they don't realize that politicians were elected by voters, including people from Veneto.
This applies to the entire Italy, thus Veneti as well think that an independent Veneto would have a much better administration than the one "imposed" by Italy, and far from the requests of common people.
However, this was proved wrong, as the current corruption scandals showed that Veneto administration was equal or worse than the Italian state.

3b) Being a rich region, Veneto pays a lot more taxes than how it receives back in services. Some of that money finances inefficiency and corruption (a certain percentage of this corruption happens in Veneto itself, but independentists usually drop this detail).

If you sum 2 and 3, you get why Veneto speaks about independence. It's the only region of Italy which would have enough advantage from separation (in separatists' minds) and is culturally different enough (all the other more diverse regions are partly autonomous).
Having said that, I think there's no real majority in favour for such independence. I'm from one of the urban areas (Venice) and I've never met a single person who was remotely pro-independence. Same applies at my boyfriend who's from Vicenza: he's never met anyone favouring it. It's surely much lower than 30%!

As FilTur said, the parties supporting independence are mostly embarassing. One of them is the Northern League, which is greatly racist and homophobic (sorry FilTur, they totally are! Don't make me write a list of their shit) and advocates the independence of the entire Northern Italy altogether. But Veneto doesn't share more similarities with Turin than with Rome!

Lastly, I don't trust surveys, and the "referendum" neither. The reason is simple: it' easy to vote "yes" on a survey or on an online vote, maybe out of anger, but the real independence would be totally different. If there was even a remote chance that Veneto seceded from Italy, the results would be a lot lower when faced with the possible practical results of division: residency permit to study in Bologna and Milan? Come on! I'd be a stranger in Milan!!

As far as the referendum goes, it was an online survey paid by privates and it happened in March: it was extremely lucky because it was contemporary to Crimea occupation and thus it went to the news all around.
We're still waiting to see the "international observers" who should have confirmed the result of such "referendum"
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Old July 29th, 2014, 05:42 PM   #189
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According the rest of Italians it is one of the most intelligible dialects of Italy
According to Venetians, the rest of Italians usually ears just a mix of Italian and Venetian, or "Venetianised Italian" I think this is a good (and funny) way to ear some Venetian language, in a dialect from the area of Padua, which is in most part (but not totally) pure:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eIbBV2swD0g

I think that fonetics and grammar are quite different*, between "real" Venetian and Italian; while words can be as well quite different (verbs like inpisare, stuare, tore, ciapare, strucare) or quite similar (verbs like gavere, esare, ndare, vedare, copare).
Having some experience of Slavic languages, anyway, I do not think that intelligibility is a problem to define different languages...

*
http://win.elgalepin.org/gvu/senplifega.html

http://www.linguaveneta.it/grammatica.asp

http://www.linguaveneta.it/grafia.asp
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Old July 29th, 2014, 06:16 PM   #190
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If you sum 2 and 3, you get why Veneto speaks about independence. It's the only region of Italy which would have enough advantage from separation (in separatists' minds) and is culturally different enough (all the other more diverse regions are partly autonomous).
Having said that, I think there's no real majority in favour for such independence. I'm from one of the urban areas (Venice) and I've never met a single person who was remotely pro-independence. Same applies at my boyfriend who's from Vicenza: he's never met anyone favouring it. It's surely much lower than 30%!

As FilTur said, the parties supporting independence are mostly embarassing. One of them is the Northern League, which is greatly racist and homophobic (sorry FilTur, they totally are! Don't make me write a list of their shit) and advocates the independence of the entire Northern Italy altogether. But Veneto doesn't share more similarities with Turin than with Rome!

Lastly, I don't trust surveys, and the "referendum" neither. The reason is simple: it' easy to vote "yes" on a survey or on an online vote, maybe out of anger, but the real independence would be totally different. If there was even a remote chance that Veneto seceded from Italy, the results would be a lot lower when faced with the possible practical results of division: residency permit to study in Bologna and Milan? Come on! I'd be a stranger in Milan!!

As far as the referendum goes, it was an online survey paid by privates and it happened in March: it was extremely lucky because it was contemporary to Crimea occupation and thus it went to the news all around.
We're still waiting to see the "international observers" who should have confirmed the result of such "referendum"
The only thing I really disagree with you, it is support for independence I do not mind if many people are aware of the benefits and problems of an independent Veneto (both ones to be considered), and I just look at what they would vote, so I am quite brute in my analysis. But please do not tell me that you know nobody, nor your boyfriend does, who supports it: or, otherwise, you just know only people who think the same things of you (no care if it is a big or a close circle).

On the other side, you miss three points in my opinion:

- I gave number about polls and not on-line referendum for the first ones we had many surveys in last years, and all agree around those numbers; for on-line referendum, I cannot trust the numbers given by the organisers of about 2.5million votes, but in the same way it is impossible that they collected just 100,000 with many voters from abroad (they would be even less of their few votes in elections, while a lot of other people, at least many leghisti and some curious, voted);

- despite the corruption scandals in Venice and Padua (which for now hit Forza Italia and Partito Democratico, but not Lega Nord), local administrations of Veneto, as well as the ones of Lombardy, remains on average the ones with best records in Italy for best efficiency and lowest expenses per capita;

- residency permits are not a real problem, if an independent Veneto can join the European Union, or at least some agreement as other states currently do; I do not think that Venetian politicians (and voters) nor European states would like a Veneto isolated from Europe, even if Italy could try to oppose a veto.

But there are also many things on which we agree, and I would add two: only a real referendum can show if polls are right or not; and a good autonomy could make the independence issue drop.

But, in the same way, Venetian autonomy would cause Rome to lose at least 10-15billionÇ of revenues per year, a big loss both for the central state administration and some region (mainly in the South) which would have to find some money elsewhere.
Actually, current "fiscal residual" is around -20billionÇ per year: it is the net loss, between taxes payed in Veneto, and what Rome spends in Veneto (including everything on the soil of Veneto, from local administration funds, to welfare state, state bureaucracy, police, courts, jails, military, public works etc.) Compared to a GDP of around 130-140billionÇ for Veneto, it means that every year about 15% of regional GDP is drained away.
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Old July 29th, 2014, 07:18 PM   #191
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Originally Posted by FilTur View Post
According to Venetians, the rest of Italians usually ears just a mix of Italian and Venetian, or "Venetianised Italian" I think this is a good (and funny) way to ear some Venetian language, in a dialect from the area of Padua, which is in most part (but not totally) pure:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eIbBV2swD0g

I think that fonetics and grammar are quite different*, between "real" Venetian and Italian; while words can be as well quite different (verbs like inpisare, stuare, tore, ciapare, strucare) or quite similar (verbs like gavere, esare, ndare, vedare, copare).
Having some experience of Slavic languages, anyway, I do not think that intelligibility is a problem to define different languages...

*
http://win.elgalepin.org/gvu/senplifega.html

http://www.linguaveneta.it/grammatica.asp

http://www.linguaveneta.it/grafia.asp
No, really. I can understand everything of that Paduan Rambo video

For me it's harder to understand Milanese than Venetian (and I'm from Milan)
But no one says Milanese is a language. Infact it is a dialect.

Try to understand Ligurian dialect, or Sicialian dialect. Good luck

Pratically all ('pure') dialects in Italy are difficult to understand if you're not from the same region.

I don't know Slavic languages, but some who knows 'em once told me that difference between 'em are similar to the difference between Italian dialects.

Then, or all Italian dialects are languages, or no one is (with few exceptions, like Sardinian)

But my point was to underline that Venetian is not that different from other Italian dialects.
I know many Venetians think it is (and I was trolling a bit in my previous post around this conviction), but actually it is not
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Old July 30th, 2014, 06:13 AM   #192
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Very interesting updates. As for Vicenza in the Veneto, for me it is one of the most beautidul and amazing cities in Europe. Palladio's work is exceptional and Teatro Olimpico is .
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Old July 30th, 2014, 09:25 AM   #193
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No, really. I can understand everything of that Paduan Rambo video

For me it's harder to understand Milanese than Venetian (and I'm from Milan)
But no one says Milanese is a language. Infact it is a dialect.

Try to understand Ligurian dialect, or Sicialian dialect. Good luck

Pratically all ('pure') dialects in Italy are difficult to understand if you're not from the same region.

I don't know Slavic languages, but some who knows 'em once told me that difference between 'em are similar to the difference between Italian dialects.

Then, or all Italian dialects are languages, or no one is (with few exceptions, like Sardinian)

But my point was to underline that Venetian is not that different from other Italian dialects.
I know many Venetians think it is (and I was trolling a bit in my previous post around this conviction), but actually it is not
Good for you, my Italian colleagues cannot understand the video very well And about Milanese, Genoese or Bolognese dialects - Gallo-Italic languages - actually I had years of experience: and I can barely understand 25% to 50% of them! Anyway better than Neapolitan or Sicilian, where for me it is difficult to understand 80-90% of spoken language.
Indeed, all Italian dialects are languages just a very few of them are recognised as, but only Tuscan and Roman can be considered dialects of standard Italian language - despite many local languages were contaminated by standard Italian in recent decades. I also agree with some linguist, who suggests that Northern Italian languages belong to the Western Latin family, near to Occitan and Catalan; while Southern Italian languages belong to Eastern Latin family, together with Rumanian.
I forgot: in Barcelona and in North Spain, I could understand at least 50% of Catalan or Spanish, without having ever studied them; but nobody thinks that they are Italian dialects.
For Slavic languages, actually they share a lot of words (but sometime with different meanings), and their fonetics and grammar are very similar. Learning Slovak, I have a language that can help me in Czech Republic too (actually, from Italian point of view, at least Czech and Slovak should be dialects of some common language); I can also understand some sentence in Polish, Slovenian or Croat; it gets more difficult with Ukrainian or Russian. But I am not Slavic, and my Slovak is an A2 level, even if I am trying to reach a B1.


P.S. Anyway, I would not like to seem "regional-nationalistic" on language. I believe that local languages in Italy are not simply dialects of standard Italian, but I consider this issue to be secondary; we can be all Italians even speaking different local languages, or as well not be all Italians even while speaking standard Italian (let's think to German-speaking countries).

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Old July 30th, 2014, 04:46 PM   #194
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For Slavic languages, actually they share a lot of words (but sometime with different meanings), and their fonetics and grammar are very similar. Learning Slovak, I have a language that can help me in Czech Republic too (actually, from Italian point of view, at least Czech and Slovak should be dialects of some common language); I can also understand some sentence in Polish, Slovenian or Croat; it gets more difficult with Ukrainian or Russian.
In fact, within Slavic language family there is a significant border line between East Slavic and West Slavic branches. East Slavic languages (Russian, Belarusian, Ukrainian) are quite mutually understandable (and they were considered as dialects before 20th century) but it's much harder for an eastern Slav to understand Polish or Czech. And it's not only vocabulary or grammar, phonetics is different too.
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Old July 31st, 2014, 11:03 AM   #195
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In fact, within Slavic language family there is a significant border line between East Slavic and West Slavic branches. East Slavic languages (Russian, Belarusian, Ukrainian) are quite mutually understandable (and they were considered as dialects before 20th century) but it's much harder for an eastern Slav to understand Polish or Czech. And it's not only vocabulary or grammar, phonetics is different too.
I agree, of course, but I found Ukrainian in Kiev (where they commonly speak Russian too) as full of words similar to Polish and Slovak languages, but anyway difficult to understand. Ukrainians there confirmed me that Ukrainian language has some linguistic legacy from Polish era. But base grammar and phonetics seemed to me not so much different - at least coming from Latin and German languages, where words are often similar, but grammar and phonetics can be really different.

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Old December 6th, 2014, 03:13 AM   #196
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I remember I and my girlfriend (who is a Venice geek, literally) once sat and ate our sandwich on the steps of the bridge in front of that modernist bank by Nervi! We actually commented how that building was the very only modern building we saw in days! And a quite interesting one too! We were on our way to see the stairways of the palace Contarini dal Bovolo, a truly hidden gem!

My question is: how do you manage to orient yourselves? We had an hard time trying to understand which way to go...and we got google maps!
Second question: tell us about an astonishing piece of art (painting or building, statue etc...) that it is actually unknown to the public but that it should be very famous in your opinion...Mine for instance is the Last Supper of Tintoretto, a masterpiece in the San Giorgio Maggiore basilica that should be incredibly famous, it's huge and gorgeous, it has it all to be a blockbuster...



Would you like to share yours?
Thanks!
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Old December 9th, 2014, 01:47 AM   #197
Jasper90
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Palazzo Contarini dal Bovolo

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Originally Posted by tommolo View Post
I remember I and my girlfriend (who is a Venice geek, literally) once sat and ate our sandwich on the steps of the bridge in front of that modernist bank by Nervi! We actually commented how that building was the very only modern building we saw in days! And a quite interesting one too! We were on our way to see the stairways of the palace Contarini dal Bovolo, a truly hidden gem!
Hi!! And thank you for reviving my thread, which I've been neglecting too much, recently
Let me first show Palazzo Contarini del Bovolo, which is a really nice and hidden gem, like you said

Why is the building called like this? Because the word b˛volo in Venetian means chiocciola = snail. The building has a very big Renaissance spiral staircase on its fašade, and the spiral shape reminds of a snail shell.
The rest of the building is late-Gothic, so it was built at the end of the 14th century, whereas the staircase addition is later, from 1499.

The beautiful staircase faces a corte, a very tiny cul-de-sac square (=court), so it's in a hidden area and that's why it's hard to find

Let the pictures speak for themselves!!
The modest Gothic part is at the left of the picture, whereas the main focus is surely on the Renaissance staircase

P.s.: note that the first picture was shot after the recent renovation of the Gothic part, while the other pictures are before


Scala Contarini del Bovolo, Venecia by pelandintecno, on Flickr


Scala del Bovolo by erwan 2949, on Flickr


Palazzo Contarini del Bovolo, Venezia by twiga_swala, on Flickr

The following two pictures show the small Corte where the staircase is located


Scala Contarini del Bovolo by Ciao Anita!, on Flickr


Scala Contarini del Bovolo by Ciao Anita!, on Flickr


Quote:
My question is: how do you manage to orient yourselves? We had an hard time trying to understand which way to go...and we got google maps!
Better not use Google Maps in Venice: it's surprisingly inaccurate, unless someone sends you the correct link.
Just to make an example: the main roads, which were the first ones to be paved, are called in Venetian Salizada = Strada selciata = street paved with flint.
Well, Google maps translates Salizada with Salita = ramp, slope

Orientation comes from habit. You learn some basic roads connecting main points, then you sometimes try parallel roads and see if they bring somewhere, or if they're cul-de-sacs. This way, with time you learn lots of alternative routes with little or no crowd around
Quote:
Second question: tell us about an astonishing piece of art (painting or building, statue etc...) that it is actually unknown to the public but that it should be very famous in your opinion...Mine for instance is the Last Supper of Tintoretto, a masterpiece in the San Giorgio Maggiore basilica that should be incredibly famous, it's huge and gorgeous, it has it all to be a blockbuster...

Would you like to share yours?
Thanks!
I'm afraid I'm gonna disappoint you
I'm (still) completely ignorant, as far as classic arts is concerned. I've had a so crappy Arts teacher at high school! He basically used to read our book loud and ask us to write what he read and, on top of that, he was extremely arrogant.

I've hated art for a long time, because of him. Now I'm recovering, especially for architecture, but I still have a long way to go, for paintings and sculpture.
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Old December 10th, 2014, 08:53 PM   #198
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Thank you for your answers!

ahaha! I know, I know! School prevents children from falling in love with art, which would rather be quite a spontaneous love otherwise!

But it has not to be art with the capital letter, I mean...Venice has lots of hidden gems, like we've seen in the Contarini dal Bovolo staircase, what's your favourite spot? It can be a corner, a sight, a courtyard, an antique caffŔ or an artesanal atelier, a campo...it's just so beautiful to speak about Venice, please, keep posting!
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Old January 10th, 2015, 07:45 AM   #199
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I think Italian gouvernment should give Venetian language the cofficial status.
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Old January 19th, 2015, 10:08 PM   #200
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I have a question: how widespread is boat ownership among residents? It is something common like owning a car in the mainland? Is there a license process to drive small boats? Are there complicated restrictions about navigating on the main canal with a private boat?
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