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Old October 5th, 2013, 01:21 AM   #81
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tykho View Post
Wonderful thread!

How often are the canals cleaned?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruston View Post
Until 1970 , each canal was cleaned every 10 years - by damming it and dry-excavating. then it was simply forgotten until around 2000 where the municipality started again to make this essential work .
And then unfortunately stopped again, because there's not enough money.

Quote:
Venice has no sewage system, so everything ends up into the canals.
Answer in the next post

Quote:
This, combined with the reduction of "live" surface of venetian lagoon (area of lagoon no more subject to tide water expansion, due for being landfilled for industry or other) was one on the reasons for the increase of "acqua alta" , much more than subsidence that is very limited.
There's no real consensus on the relative influence to high-tide from each phenomenon.

You can only measure subsidence and eustatism with precision, by measuring the relative change in average sea level. Together they account for +23 cm growth of the average sea level on the city. Unfortunately I wouldn't say its effect is limited, though.

The other effects account for the rapidity of the inflow of water into the lagoon during high tide. If the water inflow is slowed and the lagoon is larger (as it was before digging deep canals for ships and reclaiming a lot of land), the water level will begin decreasing before reaching the peak tide, thus reducing the effect of Acqua Alta. Nowadays we have the opposite situation, with fast water level growth.

But which one of the above mentioned phenomena has the strongest impact on Acqua Alta, and which one of them is nearly uninfluencial? We can't know, as we would need to "isolate" and study each one separately.

I've explained it with a lot more detail on post #34 http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...6&postcount=34
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Old October 5th, 2013, 01:48 AM   #82
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Originally Posted by Jasper90 View Post
They're referring to this statue of Erasmo da Narni, also called Gattamelata (which literally translates as "appled female cat" )

But since I don't know Padova very well, I can let vittorio tauber say something about this statue

It's one of the symbol of Padua.

It's a Donatello sculpture and it's the first equestrian sculputure after yýthe old roman empire.

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Old October 5th, 2013, 02:59 AM   #83
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Sewage

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruston View Post
Venice has no sewage system, so everything ends up into the canals.
Actually Venice has a sewage system, even if it's not perfect, and they're constantly improving it.
The city has 5 types of sewage water disposal:

1) Modern and efficient centralized water treatment, cleaning the sewage water from an entire quarter or island like in any other city around the world. These are in peripheral islands such as Lido (serving Pellestrina too) and Sant'Erasmo (serving Burano too). Some more are planned in Murano and peripheral areas of Venice such as Giudecca, Sacca Fisola, Santa Marta and Sant'Elena. They rely on gravity but also on pumps for sewage movement.
2) Modern small treatment plants, for larger buildings and productive areas such as Murano glass factories. Similar to the previous ones, but working for only 1 building.
3) Modern septic tanks, which separate "black waters" from "grey waters" (lighter, mainly containing soap) by gravity, decantation, sedimentation. They must be periodically emptied, as the mud must be removed from the bottom and disposed of. The remaining grey sewage goes untreated into the lagoon. They're mandatory when renovating a building nowadays (unless it's impossible to build one).
4) Older sewage from 20th century: they're normal tubes directly throwing everything into the lagoon as it is. These are the worst, and they can no longer be built when restoring a building (unless there's really no alternative). They're mostly in peripheric and more recent areas, and they're being replaced with modern systems (such as type 1).
5) Ancient sewage, built in the 15-16th century. This system is very intelligent, as it's made by some underground cubicles called "gÓtoli", linked to each other.
These hollow spaces are horizontal, so that the flux is very slow. This allows bacteria to decompose waste before entering the canals, yielding sterile mud to the bottom of the water. They lie under the streets and have many exits to the canals, so if one of them gets clogged the system can work anyway. The tides help cleaning up these tunnels.
Most of them are being modernized by impermeabilization and construction of exploratory entrances, in order to help perform manteinance and controls on the quality of water.

The exits to the canals are usually located at -75 cm under the sea level, therefore they're not visible in normal conditions.

This is what I remember (with help from a little research on the internet) but I may add something else in the future when I check on some books I have at home
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Old October 9th, 2013, 03:23 AM   #84
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Services: Healthcare (part 1)

Since there are no questions, I'd like to show some notable public buildings inside the city.

I'll begin with healthcare and hospitals in Venice city and surroundings.

This is the entrance to the Civil Hospital of Venice. It was built between 1485 and 1505 as a seat for the Grand School of Saint Marc (a Venetian School was a laical confraternity, which could include any Venetian citizen, not only nobles).

In 1807 the School was suppressed and the building was converted to an Austrian military hospital. Later it became a civil hospital, with some alterations to the inside structure.

Here's the aerial view with Google Maps: you can see the huge complex, with 4 courts on the left and more recent pavillions on the right. http://goo.gl/maps/4zrYk

Here is the white grand Renaissance fašade, in Campo Santi Giovanni e Paolo (the square is called after the nearby Church of Saint John and Paul). It serves as the hospital entrance. You can see the church on the right, in the second picture.

image hosted on flickr

Pouvoir de guÚrir di ro_lo_be, su Flickr

image hosted on flickr

San Zanipolo di Kevin H., su Flickr

This is the hospital hall. It's where you ask for information and collect your blood tests results
I love the pavement and the wooden ceiling.

image hosted on flickr

Hospital - Venice (IT) di Filip M.A., su Flickr

Unfortunately I could only find this un-embeddable picture of the beautiful courts inside the hospital: http://flic.kr/p/93nC8B
This is one of the many fluffy inhabitants of the hospital http://flic.kr/p/93nLb2

This is the north side of the old hospital pavillion. It has very little historical value.
image hosted on flickr

ambulance boats di ✿ willem ツ, su Flickr

This is the modern addition, which serves as an emergency room. I can't help but notice that it looks like a giant monster waiting to eat every patient

image hosted on flickr

Venice hospital di *Bess*, su Flickr

And this is Jona pavillion. It's currently under renovation, as the fašade was preserved but everything else behind was demolished. It's one of the very few allowed demolitions in Venice.
They're renovating the hospital and adding some university facilities for Medical students from Padova University, and a heliport on top of the building.
I don't like the final result at all... The second picture is a rendering, whereas the first picture also shows the waterbus stop.

image hosted on flickr

131/1000 di One-Thousand-Words, su Flickr

image hosted on flickr

32 di Luca-F, su Flickr

This is a boat ambulance

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Ambulanza di Xavier_15, su Flickr
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Old October 9th, 2013, 03:57 AM   #85
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Services: Healthcare (part 2)

I'd like to talk about two other hospitals in Venice.

The first is the new hospital, located outside Mestre, which serves the mainland part of Venice. It's used by Venetians as well, even if it's quite hard to reach (as buses and trains aren't very frequent).

It was heavily criticised for being located in a peripheric location, and because it looks like a hybrid between an airport and a shopping mall

I like its design, even if it has a problem with overheating during summer. It overall gives a good service, but forces Venetians to a long transfer.

image hosted on flickr

e il nuovo ospedale di mestre di soramariapia, su Flickr

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Ospedale dell'Angelo #2 di Gabriele Kahal, su Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Interno di AnDre | MA_sight, su Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Garden di AnDre | MA_sight, su Flickr

This is the new nearby train station

image hosted on flickr

Senza titolo di Graz_86, su Flickr

The second hospital is the Ospedale al Mare (Sea Hospital) on the island of Lido. It was completely abandoned in 2006 and nowadays it lies completely dilapidated.

It was sold to become a touristic resort, but the trade has later been cancelled. It's now waiting for someone to buy and convert it.

You can find thousands of pictures of its disrepair on Flickr, just looking for "Lido hospital".

image hosted on flickr

12 08 29 Abandoned Lido Hospital 22.jpg di Graham Coreil-Allen, su Flickr

image hosted on flickr

_DSC3136.jpg di kokimimi, su Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Ospedale al Mare, Venezia, lo scempio e l'abbandono.... di ChinellatoPhoto, su Flickr

This is Marinoni theatre, built at the beginning of the 20th century in Liberty-Art Nouveau style. It was abandoned in 1975 but the problem got worse with the closure of the hospital, because they lie nearby.

The beautiful theatre risked demolition, but got recently listed, so it must be preserved.

The theatre was occupied a few years ago, and now it's run as a community theatre by some experimental drama companies, who push for its recovery.

Here's the theatre (un-embeddable picture): http://flic.kr/p/cQac8Q

And this is the fresco on the ceiling

image hosted on flickr

Soffitto Teatro Marinoni di gabrieli gino, su Flickr
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Old October 9th, 2013, 06:19 AM   #86
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beautiful theatre...I hope it's restored to its former glory.
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Old October 9th, 2013, 10:24 PM   #87
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I didn't know there were really any modern buildings in Venice. I figured pretty much everything there was old.
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Old October 9th, 2013, 10:42 PM   #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by photolitherland View Post
I didn't know there were really any modern buildings in Venice. I figured pretty much everything there was old.
Well, you have to distinguish between:
Venice (the old city) which is on few islands and that's the Venice well known all around the world

and

the area of Venice (Mestre and surroundings).

[IMG]http://i43.************/2dkk0b4.gif[/IMG]

During the last 30 years the area in the triangle created by Venice, Padova and Treviso grew up a lot and now can be considered as a whole metropolitan area (usually known as PaTreVe). The politics are trying to link together all these cities of the Veneto Region with reference to urban pubblic trasport by bus or train or rubbish treatment and other public services.

[IMG]http://i39.************/2u9ia6q.gif[/IMG]
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Old October 10th, 2013, 07:45 AM   #89
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History of architecture - Byzantine, Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque, Neoclassical

Thank you Ricpast, I couldn't explain it any better!

As far as Venice (old city) is concerned, there are a few modern buildings inside the city. But the question of modern intervention in Venice Historical Centre (and any other historical centre) is open, and doesn't have a single solution.

I'll begin a few posts on Venetian architecture, trying to summarize its evolution in order to point out how it evolved into Modern interventions in Venice.



Every historical time has had its typical architectural style, often with overlap between two consecutive styles, and influences from abroad: Byzantine, Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque and Neoclassical are the main ancient styles in Venice.

Ca' Da Mosto is a good example of Byzantine architecture. It was built in the 13th century and it's one of the oldest buildings on the Grand Canal.

image hosted on flickr

Ca' da Mosto di GwenaŰl Piaser, su Flickr


This is Gothic Ca' D'Oro (House of Gold). Gothic is the most famous Venetian architectural style around the world, and it has inspired a lot of buildings everywhere. It was built in 1430.

image hosted on flickr

Ca' d'Oro Facade di albireo2006, su Flickr

Ca' Vendramin Calergi is the oldest Casino in the world. It was built in 1638 in Renaissance style, and it's still operating.

image hosted on flickr

Casin˛ di Venezia - casa da gioco pi¨ antica del mondo 1638 di Pivari.com, su Flickr

Ca' Rezzonico shows the ornate Baroque style: its construction was begun in 1649 by Baldassare Longhena and ended 100 years later by Giorgio Massari!

image hosted on flickr

Baroque Ca' Rezzonico Museo on the Grand Canal Venice Italy di mbell1975, su Flickr

This is the Church of San Simeone Piccolo (Little Saint Simon), built in neoclassical style between 1718 and 1738. It's the first thing you can see outside the train station.

image hosted on flickr

Venezia - San Simeon Piccolo di ale.andreotti, su Flickr

I'm sorry if I've resumed so quickly the historical architecture of Venice. I just wished to give you a glimpse of every architectural style in the city.

In the next post, I'll talk about the Historicist architecture from the 19th century.
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Old October 10th, 2013, 08:18 AM   #90
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History of architecture - Historicism in the 19th century

In the 19th century a lot of buildings were built in Neo-gothic style, as a "copy" of the original Gothic style. Historicism was very common until the beginning of the 20th century, and much of the modern face of Venice was created at the time.

Neo-gothic style was not the only revivalist style, as we also have some examples of Neo-Moorish and Neo-Byzantine architecture.

Here you can find an example of Neo-Byzantine architecture: Fondaco dei Turchi (Turkish Warehouse) was heavily renovated between 1860 and 1880, changing its appearance to make it look "more exotic". http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...44&postcount=9

This is Palazzo Genovese, built in 1892 in Neo-gothic style. It now hosts a luxury hotel.

image hosted on flickr

Senza titolo di 08supmylo, su Flickr

This is the huge Molino Stucky (Stucky's Mill). It's an industrial building in Neo-gothic style, which was recently turned into a Hilton Hotel after a big fire which occurred in 2003. It was built in 1895.

image hosted on flickr

Molino Stucky di roberzeb, su Flickr

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Molino Stucky di Deep Calm, su Flickr

This is Pescheria, the fish market in front of the Grand Canal. It was built in 1907 despite its more ancient appearance.

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Pescheria du Rialto di tigrus26, su Flickr

As soon as I have some more time, I'll go on with this architectural travel in Venice
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Old October 10th, 2013, 04:14 PM   #91
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Lovely thread! You're putting a lot of effort and honest passion into this Jasper, which I really appreciate.
Venice is completely unique and mindblowing, mankind should do everything it can to preserve it (not just Venetians/Italians).

Please keep it coming!
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Old October 10th, 2013, 04:50 PM   #92
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History of architecture - Art Nouveau in Lido

At the beginning of the 20th century Art Nouveau style, with its Italian declination called Liberty, was very common all over Italy.
Venice has no Liberty style buildings, as this popular style was only used in interior design. However a lot of Liberty buildings exist in Lido island, as it was a very popular beach resort at the beginning of the 20th century.

Here's a few examples. I can't believe I can use Google Street View on Lido! It's sooooo helpful


This is the famous Grand Hotel Des Bains, built in 1900 in Liberty style with British influences.
Sir Thomas Mann stayed in this hotel, and the story in his book (Death in Venice) takes place in this hotel.
Here's Streetview link: http://goo.gl/maps/lIqtf

image hosted on flickr

Senza titolo di johnshaun, su Flickr

This is Excelsior Grand Hotel, built in 1908 with a distinct Neo-Moorish style. This luxury hotel often hosts Hollywood actors during Venice Film Festival (which takes place in Lido).

Here's Streetview link: http://goo.gl/maps/e2v9b

image hosted on flickr

Excelsior Hotel at Lido, Venice di Clive Lawford, su Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Westin Excelsior Hotel on Lido di TracyElaine, su Flickr

This is Ausonia & Hungaria Hotel, and its fašade was built in 1913 with coloured majolica. I think it's one of the best examples of Liberty architecture in Italy. Take a look at the decorations!
Here's Streetview link: http://goo.gl/maps/wdIo1

image hosted on flickr

Hotel Ausonia Hungaria (al Lido di Venezia) di CasteFoto, su Flickr

image hosted on flickr

hungari-hungaria10 di www.ilreporter.com, su Flickr

There are many other smaller examples of this style in Lido, but these are the most famous ones
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Old October 10th, 2013, 05:15 PM   #93
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The Ausonia & Hungaria Hotel looks stunning.
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Old October 10th, 2013, 06:03 PM   #94
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Good old times
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Old October 10th, 2013, 10:40 PM   #95
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History of architecture - Historicist popular housing before World War II

Quote:
Originally Posted by Galro View Post
The Ausonia & Hungaria Hotel looks stunning.
I like it a lot too! And they're very nice: despite being a luxury hotel, they often open their lobby to the citizens for assemblies, such as the group of people pushing for the renovation of Marinoni Theatre (a few posts ago).

Now let's move on and see what was built in Venice, in the time when Liberty hotels were built in Lido.

Since Venice faced a huge problem with overcrowding, some peripheric areas of the city were reclaimed and new quarters were built at the beginning of the 20th century. A specific style for these buildings was invented: it's eclectic, as it draws some architectural features from every Venetian style, mixing them together.
The purpose of this style is to blend the new buildings with historical Venice, so that they don't stand out, but they also don't appear "cheap". This purpose was achieved: most of these areas are pleasant uninteresting residential neighborhoods.

These areas include Sant'Elena, Santa Marta (its original name was Quartiere Mussolini ), Celestia, Madonna dell'Orto, Sant'Anna. This style was also applied to Marghera on mainland Venice, mixed with the ideal of the garden city, with a bad result as the plan was not thoroughly followed. This style was heavily criticised by Le Corbusier, as many European and American cities were experimenting International style, Modernism and Rationalism at the time.

The most ornate of these quarters is Sant'Elena, the "tail" of Venice. Construction began in 1923 with eclectic style, mostly drawing from Renaissance architectural features. Between the quarter and the lagoon lies the largest Venetian park, with sports fields and playground.

Note that some windows lack the typical scuri (dark green wooden shutters). Some windows have horrible cheap metal-framed windows, which aren't allowed anymore in Venice.

image hosted on flickr

SantĺElena in Venice, Italy di Emilio J Santacoloma, su Flickr

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True colours * di Daisuke Ido, su Flickr

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Where is everybody? di Teone!, su Flickr

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Viale IV novembre / Viale Piave Sant'Elena di klausbergheimer, su Flickr

This is Santa Marta (former Quartiere Mussolini), built by fascism in 1924-1929 to accommodate nearby Cotton industry workers, and railway workers. The approach is the same, as the quarter tries to recreate a Venetian atmosphere. Unfortunately the quarter is surrounded by walls (which enclose the port area), and I've always found it quite claustrophobic, also due to the absence of canals. Another non-Venetian feature is the grid pattern followed by the new buildings.
A part of these walls might be demolished in the future, as they should recover a former industrial area which lies behind.

Here you can notice the wall in the background of the picture.

image hosted on flickr

Santa Marta di raul pacheco, su Flickr

The quarter lies behind the wall. The cars are inside the harbour area, one of the very few parts of the city where they're allowed.

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_DSC0573.JPG di Giacomo Cosua, su Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Santa Marta di maurimazz, su Flickr
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Old October 10th, 2013, 11:45 PM   #96
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History of architecture - Rationalism and Monumentalism

Conservative Historicism and Eclectism stopped in the '30s, as Modern movement became popular. They were replaced by Rationalism, which was heavily influenced by Monumental Fascist style.
This style was chosen for the new buildings close to Rio Novo, the canal which was opened by Fascism in order to connect San Marco to Piazzale Roma (the newly built bus and car terminal) faster.

I'm going crazy to find some pictures of Rio Novo, I don't know why!! This is what I've found.

Here: http://flic.kr/p/d77RVd

image hosted on flickr

Repetita juvant X di Daisuke Ido, su Flickr

Night picture...

image hosted on flickr

Rio Nuovo, Venezia di klausbergheimer, su Flickr

Small pictures!





Another very famous Rationalist building is the City parking in Piazzale Roma (Streetview: http://goo.gl/maps/0X2d3 ), built in 1933 by Eugenio Miozzi (chief engineer of Venice city district) together with Piazzale Roma itself and the bridge connecting with the mainland. The symmetrical wing on the left was added after the war, whereas the yellow parking is post-war too.

image hosted on flickr

Venice Italy 2009 di supermuch, su Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Il Parking Garage di Vencie di wfbakker2, su Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Calatrava di maaary_1984, su Flickr


Here you can find the Rationalist Train station:
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...8&postcount=17

This building (Palazzo Ex Compartimentale) was added near the Train Station by Angiolo Mazzoni in the '40s: you can see it in the linked picture on the right of the new bridge by Santiago Calatrava.
http://flic.kr/p/diEy2e





Here you can see Hotel Bauer's modern fašade, which I've already spoken about. http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...7&postcount=44

The modern part of Hotel Danieli was completed in 1948. This is how it looks like nowadays:



And this is how it was before the new wing was added, from a picture by Canaletto from the 18th century.



EDIT: I've finally found a good picture of Rio Novo Rationalist buildings!!!! You can find it here http://flic.kr/p/4fSXrV
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Last edited by Jasper90; October 15th, 2013 at 07:08 AM. Reason: Added picture
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Old October 11th, 2013, 02:54 AM   #97
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What is the oldest standing building/structure in Venice?
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Old October 14th, 2013, 02:25 AM   #98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erbse View Post
Lovely thread! You're putting a lot of effort and honest passion into this Jasper, which I really appreciate.
Venice is completely unique and mindblowing, mankind should do everything it can to preserve it (not just Venetians/Italians).

Please keep it coming!
Thank you very much for your appreciation! It really helps me go on with this thread

A lot of people from abroad contribute to this city's manteinance with money and resources. The most famous association is called Venice in Peril fund. It was created in London after the 1966 great flooding which did huge damage mainly to Florence and Venice. Former president Anna Somers Cocks is quite famous because she often speaks loudly about the problems faced by Venice.

Quote:
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What is the oldest standing building/structure in Venice?
I actually have no idea but I can look for it, because I'm curious too.

It'll be hard to determine because it was very common to completely renovate and change a building in ancient times. So you may have something which was built in 1000, then renovated in 1400, got a new fašade in 1600 and new windows in 1800.

I'll give you a more precise answer when I've finished with the question about modern Venice
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Old October 14th, 2013, 06:32 AM   #99
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History of architecture - Some other Rationalist buildings, and new islands

Rationalist buildings broke the tie with Venetian architecture, as they have nothing in common with their predecessors. But I think they've managed to find their place in Venice anyway. This architectural trend went on until the '70s, ending with the "extreme" examples of Cassa di Risparmio di Venezia and the Sports Palace (the only Brutalist building in Venice).

Palazzetto dello Sport (Sports "little" palace) was completed in 1976 replacing the old Arsenal ovens. I couldn't find any picture or news showing these ovens.

It's the only Brutalist building in Venice, as it's a huge polygonal piece of concrete without windows. It's barely visible from anywhere except the entrance, as it was designed to remain hidden behind those higher buildings facing the Lagoon. It's one of the very few buildings in Venice with an underground floor.

On the rear the Palazzetto features a perfect typical Venetian water entrance, except it's made of concrete

Aerial view: as you can see, the building is very close to the Arsenal and to the South bank of Venice. http://goo.gl/maps/qAJjr

image hosted on flickr

obviously, Venice di Paolo Cagliero, su Flickr

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Palasport Arsenale di klabbeo, su Flickr

Rear view, with water entrance on the nearest corner

image hosted on flickr

Fehlerbild di augmatic, su Flickr

The interior (with some art from the Biennale, Lithuanian Pavillion)

image hosted on flickr

Flight of stairs di augmatic, su Flickr

[UPDATE]: This is the only small part of the Sports palace you can see from the South Bank of Venice, when walking on the bridge nearby. I've finally been able to find a picture!

image hosted on flickr

Venice / Venezia / Venedig di jurip, su Flickr



Bonus picture: the nearby Communist Refoundation party who take care of this Jesus Christ image. It's one of those funny and cool contradictions you can find all over Italy

(N.B.: Communist Refoundation is actually quite a normal Left Wing/Labour party, I guess they've stopped trying to refound communism a long time ago)

image hosted on flickr

Partito Comunista Italiano di augmatic, su Flickr



I've already mentioned the bank Cassa di Risparmio di Venezia, also called Palazzo Nervi - Scattolin from the name of the architects who designed it.

The building was completed in 1972 replacing an eclectic style building from 1871, which had itself replaced a very old belltower, the only one with pentagonal shape (built in 999 A.D.)

The modern fašade was built in Campo Manin, a square which had been heavily modified at the end of the 19th century by replacing a lot of buildings. However the other fašade in Campo San Luca was left nearly untouched, in order not to spoil the much more interesting historicity of the buildings facing such square.

Here you can find the previous post about Cassa di Risparmio di Venezia. http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...3&postcount=18

image hosted on flickr

Nervi di wamcclung, su Flickr

This is the only picture I could find of the historical fašade on Campo San Luca: it's the yellow overexposed building on the background.

image hosted on flickr

Campo San Luca (2) di mtiro, su Flickr

As far as public housing is concerned, in 1960 the Island of Sacca Fisola was reclaimed with waste and a new quarter was built upon it.
It's the first popular housing area which was built without the eclectic-Venetian style. The result was pretty bad: houses have a very cheap appearance and Sacca Fisola has always had problems with squatting, unemployment, lack of services and low wealth.
The streets and the main square were paved in 2003-2004: they were unpaved or badly asphalted before.

The island is connected to a few other small Sacche: one of them hosts an indoor swimming pool, whereas the other one hosted an incinerator from 1973 to 1985.

(Sacca in Venetian indicates an area which has been reclaimed by dumping waste and mud).

Here is the island as seen from Venice: http://flic.kr/p/fgaQ2u

image hosted on flickr

venice di Roberto Trm, su Flickr

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Sacca Fisola di Alfarm (Aldo Navoni), su Flickr

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venice di Roberto Trm, su Flickr

This is the former incinerator, which has now been demolished. The island is waiting for funding in order to be cleaned and recovered: the project already exists. Those boats are still used to collect trash inside Venice.



Another island was built in 1961: it's called Tronchetto or Isola Nuova (New Island). It should have served as a hub for some services which were better located in large modern buildings outside Venice centre, such as a big parking, sports centre, two large hotels, offices, wholesale market, bus terminal...

It ended up being only a large ugly car park and fruit wholesale market. It's responsible for the bad sight on the right when approaching Venice by train or car. A few offices are being built nowadays, more than 50 years late.

Streetview link: http://goo.gl/maps/wJYp3
The parking, as seen from the Freedom Bridge: http://goo.gl/maps/qHjn1
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Last edited by Jasper90; November 13th, 2013 at 09:51 PM. Reason: Added picture of the Sports Palace
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Old October 15th, 2013, 05:32 AM   #100
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History of architecture - Contemporary interventions and the "return to Venetianity"

After the huge debate sparked by the Rationalist insertions in the city in the '70s, newer buildings tried to re-connect with Venice and its history.

The Italian architecture critics strongly oppose Neo-Historicism, because they believe that every historical period must leave its trace to a Historical Centre. If I build a Neo-Gothic building nowadays, I'm leaving no trace of our time on the city.

Famous Venetian architect Carlo Scarpa provokingly proposed the demolition of at least half of what was built in the 19th century, on grounds that it was a mere copy of Gothic times with no added value.

This idea is the very foundation of Italian historical centres: every historical age must build something original in the city, by demolishing and replacing the least interesting historical buildings, or filling the "holes" in the city. I tend to agree with this point of view, even if it may sound a little too strong, because it's more or less what happened since medieval times.

This didn't prevent modern architects from being inspired by historical features. But the inspiration isn't aesthetical (E.g. no Gothic windows on modern buildings). It's a deeply functional inspiration, and I'll try to show it with a few examples.

1) Area Ex-Saffa, by Vittorio Gregotti, 1981-85

It's the conversion of former Saffa area, a large matches factory close to the train station, to public popular housing.
The intervention saw the demolition of nearly all the late 19th century buildings in the area, in order to make room for the new quarter. Only a few elements such as the chimney, the oven and the peripheral walls were preserved. I couldn't find any picture of the previous structures, but I've found out that there's been a controversy with the Sovrintendenza (Board for Cultural and Historical Heritage) who wished to preserve the industrial buildings. I strongly doubt they'd ever allow such demolition nowadays.


Gregotti's work is usually strictly linked with rationalism and perfectly square shapes. In my opinion, in his Venetian work he was able to adapt these geometric shapes to the local urban shape, creating a typical Venetian neighborhood despite the high-tech industrial-looking architecture and the rigid street pattern.

Here's an aerial view: most of the quarter is easily recognisable north-east of the green arrow, as it's made up of 4 parallel rows of pink houses.
The green arrow indicates the main square, but all the pink houses which surround it are part of the quarter as well. http://goo.gl/maps/78Mue

A few typical Venetian features are recognisable on the buildings: the salmon-pink colour, the wooden terraces on top of the houses (called altane), the chimneys and the water well in the middle of the square.



Houses with altane on top:

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VE_200905-06_ IMG_2813 di Martino Pietropoli has become definitely low-fi., su Flickr

The bricks well in the main square:

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Pozzo in Area Saffa di Giulio Segantin, su Flickr

I really dislike black and white, but I must admit it's a very good picture. All the houses are pink, except the one on the background (which isn't part of Saffa)

image hosted on flickr

Campo Saffa 4 di Giulio Segantin, su Flickr

Some passages through the rows of houses:

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Area Saffa - Venezia di benth0s, su Flickr

Other pictures here, including a picture showing a preserved arcade of the factory: http://bluoscar.blogspot.it/2010/11/area-saffa.html
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