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Old October 27th, 2013, 07:30 PM   #141
600West218
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In the train I was going south east along the Elbe hoping that I would see some nice city scapes.

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The U-bahn itself is VERY nice.

Unfortunately even along the parts of the line where it was above ground it was either at street level or sunk below grade - it was never on elevated tracks. Hence it didn't offer a nice view of anything. So I next headed back to different section of the old port with the idea of seeing an interesting maritime museum.

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This was a brand new, and very nice, metro station.

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As you can see the lighting changes. A nice touch to enliven the station.

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Brand new, spotless, and barely used.

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They have big plans for this area.

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But when you emerge from the station and see this you realize they aren't quite there yet.

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The ICE heading in to Hamburg's main station. Attentive folks will note some pictures from my arrival into Hamburg actually showed this area.

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The waterways of the old harbor are there but the buildings have been knocked down with their replacements yet to be built.

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I believe this is a regional train. BTW, the city of Hamburg is actually a German state all by itself. I guess there are historical reasons for that. If I'm not mistaken Bremen is as well.

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This is looking in the general direction of the main harbor and city center.

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A viewpoint they seem to have put up so people can better observe the construction. I was glad to go up it.

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You can see the infrastructure is brand new.

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The modern harbor in the distance.

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Old October 27th, 2013, 07:34 PM   #142
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Did St. Pauli start out as a rugby club?? Or did it have one along side the soccer team?
As the marker says, their rugby department was founded in 1933, 23 years after the club was founded.

They did and still do have rugby teams although the club is pretty much about as unsuccessful in rugby as it is in soccer. Their womens' team is the most successful, getting the German Championship eight times, and fielding a number of national team players.

Can't blame St. Pauli for that though, rugby in Germany is heavily based on local sports traditions, and only two cities, Hanover and Heidelberg, have completely dominated the field in the past hundred years.
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Old October 27th, 2013, 07:50 PM   #143
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The city of Hamburg is actually a German state all by itself.
Some of Hamburg's boroughs were even part of a complete different country until the 19th century, that country being Denmark. Altona back then was the second biggest Danish city right after Copenhagen.
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Old October 27th, 2013, 10:58 PM   #144
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Next it was time to head to a "Maritime Museum".

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Quite a stark contrast between the old and the new. I think I like the old more.

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An impressive old building the museum is in.

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Ok, so here is the deal. It isn't so much a museum as the public collection of someone who had LOTS of models of ships and ports, with some actual artifacts thrown in. Very nicely done, and with nine big floors quite large, but not a true museum.

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And many of the models are not much bigger than the size of a finger so you really don't get much out of them.

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A model of the west side of Manhattan.

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A map of coffee consumption. The museum went into detail on the central importance of coffee and spice imports to Hamburg's development.

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U.S. aircraft carriers.

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A mock up of how wooden ships were constructed.

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And a picture of how modern behemoths are constructed.

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There were also larger models. As you can see, this place is largely models.

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This actually was an interesting diagram. It tracked the timing of a shipment of a game console from China to Hamburg.

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That actually is quite a long time to market. Some industry is moving back to the U.S. precisely because getting products here from places in Asia takes too long.

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Of course, although slow shipping by sea is shockingly inexpensive. Getting a bottle of wine from Chile to Germany - almost from one end of the planet to another - costs a fraction of a cent.

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I must say their model collection is complete. These are "Lakers", the big bulk carriers that ply the Great Lakes of the U.S. and Canada.

Here is more info on how "Black Gold" helped Hamburg.

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Interesting to see a picture of Spiecherstadt in action.

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Not sure if this would be the German navy or Prussian navy.

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The aircraft carrier Intrepid which is now a museum in New York City.

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A German carrier which I don't think was ever built.

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Back out on the street. The Maritime Museum was nice but definitely over rated. I was to see a real maritime museum a couple of days later that was a much, much better museum.

Now it was off to meet my CouchSurfing host.
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Old October 27th, 2013, 11:37 PM   #145
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No wonder. Backsteinexpressionismus/brick expressionism is a rather Northern German thing
Brick expression is also found in the Netherlands. Amsterdam has whole suburban districts from the interbellum build in that style!
It's called Amsterdam School and also classified under brick exspressionism although less heavy than the German form.
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Old October 28th, 2013, 05:43 AM   #146
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It's funny, I haven't felt such a big urge to go to the Netherlands, but I think I'm going to have to do it.
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Old October 28th, 2013, 05:53 AM   #147
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Germans love models. There is a huge miniature railway in the Speicherstadt. It's a must-see if you're into models.
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Old October 28th, 2013, 05:55 AM   #148
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Back outside the museum it was off to wandering around the Speicherstadt before meeting our CouchSurfer host for dinner.

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The museum itself is quite some building.

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You can see the water levels fluctuate dramatically.

Also, these buildings aren't just functional. They are also quite beautiful.

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Note the buildings on the left which give a glimpse of the old Hamburg. Also quite obvious is how the water levels change. The Elbe is clearly tidal in Hamburg.

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A church on a barge.

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We were meeting our host at the local U-bahn station. Note the air raid shelter in the distance.

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Here is something that is quite interesting and that I have never seen before. The two cars of the train share the same set of wheels. Hence, these two cars can never be separated. A somewhat economical but very strange arrangement.

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After a very nice dinner our host took us on a night time walk through Speicherstadt.

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As you can see it was quite nicely illuminated.

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Thus ended our first full day in Hamburg. Two and a half more days to go in Hamburg and not a dull moment among them.
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Old October 28th, 2013, 06:00 AM   #149
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Germans love models. There is a huge miniature railway in the Speicherstadt. It's a must-see if you're into models.
I noticed that. I've seen lots of really good model shops in Germany. I also saw them in England and Russia. I don't build models anymore but it still makes me envious.
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Old October 28th, 2013, 08:21 AM   #150
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Here is something that is quite interesting and that I have never seen before. The two cars of the train share the same set of wheels. Hence, these two cars can never be separated. A somewhat economical but very strange arrangement.
That's called a Jacobs bogie. Apparently some trains in the US also had them.
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Old October 28th, 2013, 01:35 PM   #151
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I know those two ships; I have worked with them (from my office in Marseille). In fact I remember Johanna from over a decade ago, she appears to be in good condition still from your photo.

I note that they are completely empty!
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Old October 28th, 2013, 04:49 PM   #152
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That's called a Jacobs bogie. Apparently some trains in the US also had them.
All highspeed trains have them too (TGV, ICE, Eurostar...) It drastically lowers the chance of a car derailing.
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Old October 29th, 2013, 05:24 AM   #153
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I know those two ships; I have worked with them (from my office in Marseille). In fact I remember Johanna from over a decade ago, she appears to be in good condition still from your photo.

I note that they are completely empty!
Yes, these ships were anchored there the whole time I was there.

I find them to be an interesting size. I don't think they do trans Atlantic routes. They look too small for the open ocean. More likely they just do runs along the European coast line and to the Mediteranian. I guess maybe they could even go inland along the Elbe, Rhine and Danube.
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Old October 29th, 2013, 05:27 AM   #154
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All highspeed trains have them too (TGV, ICE, Eurostar...) It drastically lowers the chance of a car derailing.
Well, it is interesting. That Wilkipedia article said not necessarily that they reduce accidents but when derailments occur the cars don't fold up so injuries are less likely among passengers. I guess that makes sense. The way they are joined it is more likely the cars will stay in a straight line even in a derailment.
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Old October 29th, 2013, 02:21 PM   #155
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Yes, these ships were anchored there the whole time I was there.

I find them to be an interesting size. I don't think they do trans Atlantic routes. They look too small for the open ocean. More likely they just do runs along the European coast line and to the Mediteranian. I guess maybe they could even go inland along the Elbe, Rhine and Danube.
They are feeder container ships. The large mother vessels arrive from big ports around the world and call at the major European hub ports, like in this case Hamburg; the containers are then distributed to their final destination at smaller ports via feeder vessel; and same thing in reverse.

If I remember correctly we used these two vessels on routes between Hamburg and the Baltic ports (Gdansk, Stockholm, St Petersburg etc), via the Kiel Canal.
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Old October 30th, 2013, 04:28 AM   #156
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They are feeder container ships. The large mother vessels arrive from big ports around the world and call at the major European hub ports, like in this case Hamburg; the containers are then distributed to their final destination at smaller ports via feeder vessel; and same thing in reverse.

If I remember correctly we used these two vessels on routes between Hamburg and the Baltic ports (Gdansk, Stockholm, St Petersburg etc), via the Kiel Canal.
Very interesting.

Is that because St. Petersburg and Stockholm are not capable of handling ships the size of the ones that come into Hamburg it there is simply not enough cargo to justify the large ships going to those ports so they use the smaller ones?
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Old October 30th, 2013, 05:02 AM   #157
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The next day was a Saturday and we were traveling with our Couchsurfing host to the North Sea for some hiking along the sea bed at low tide. Something I always wanted to do so I was very much looking forward to it.

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The train ride to Cuxhaven took us past more of the usual trains filled with cars...

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The town itself was a nice costal town that looked comfortable but unspectacular.

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Most of the buildings were modern.

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As you can sort of see the weather was very... northern German.

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Between the town and the sea was a large berm, or see wall.

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At low tide people walk out, or ride horses or horse drawn carriages, to an island that is about 10 kilometers off the coast.

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Note the ships on the horizon. What happens is there is a part where the water is very shallow and at low tide it becomes land. However, beside this is the Elbe River itself and where it outlets into the North Sea is is always plenty deep and navigable by these huge ships.

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Some people hike out but lots of people ride out on horses or ride in horse drawn wagons. The horses are really big. by 600West218, on Flickr

Some more horses coming through the town.

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This was clearly a popular place with LOTS of people heading out onto the seabed.

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As you can see the beach was not exactly a happening place this day.

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The branches that you see mark the path that you are to follow to get to the islands by 600West218, on Flickr

These branches placed along the sea bed mark the various trails that you can follow. I think you are supposed to do this walk in a group with a guide. However, the trails were well marked and you could always see lots of other people so I think in point of fact you could do it on your own, as long as you were careful to know the tides and be around other people.

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There were lots these tidal creaks which were generally easy to walk across. They were about a foot deep and with very little current. However the air and the water were both cold.

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It almost looks like the ship is beached on the land.

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Notice the seabed is full of holes and air bubbles. These are from various small animals or worms that live in it.

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This was our group. As you can see people were cold.

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Because of the clouds and the fog you could just barely make out what might have been the island on the horizon.

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This is an interesting safety device. If you get trapped by an incoming tide you can climb up into this safety basic and press an alarm and then wait to be rescued. As you can see it isn't all that high, which means the tide isn't that high either. There were a number of these in different locations.

We weren't going with the group all the way to the island. That was more than we were willing to do and it didn't work well with the train schedule. So we headed back to the mainland.

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As we headed in plenty of horses and people were still heading out.
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Old October 30th, 2013, 08:53 AM   #158
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Very interesting.

Is that because St. Petersburg and Stockholm are not capable of handling ships the size of the ones that come into Hamburg it there is simply not enough cargo to justify the large ships going to those ports so they use the smaller ones?
There are a few main ports or hubs in Europe which receive the liner ships from the largest conainter shipping companies. Cargo from smaller ports is first transported from smaller ports to the hubs and transported on bigger ships before it is transported to other hubs on other continents and where it can be loaded on yet another smaller ship to be transported to a smaller port on that continent. European hubs are Hamburg, Rotterdam, Antwerp etc... just the big seaports. Just look up where the big container (and other) shipping companies have their hubs. The port of Antwerp, for example, is the main port for the company MSC in Europe and Maersk uses Algeciras.
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Old October 30th, 2013, 01:41 PM   #159
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There are a few main ports or hubs in Europe which receive the liner ships from the largest conainter shipping companies. Cargo from smaller ports is first transported from smaller ports to the hubs and transported on bigger ships before it is transported to other hubs on other continents and where it can be loaded on yet another smaller ship to be transported to a smaller port on that continent. European hubs are Hamburg, Rotterdam, Antwerp etc... just the big seaports. Just look up where the big container (and other) shipping companies have their hubs. The port of Antwerp, for example, is the main port for the company MSC in Europe and Maersk uses Algeciras.
Makes sense. It is a hub and spoke system then - just like airlines have.
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Old October 30th, 2013, 04:42 PM   #160
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There are a few main ports or hubs in Europe which receive the liner ships from the largest conainter shipping companies. Cargo from smaller ports is first transported from smaller ports to the hubs and transported on bigger ships before it is transported to other hubs on other continents and where it can be loaded on yet another smaller ship to be transported to a smaller port on that continent. European hubs are Hamburg, Rotterdam, Antwerp etc... just the big seaports. Just look up where the big container (and other) shipping companies have their hubs. The port of Antwerp, for example, is the main port for the company MSC in Europe and Maersk uses Algeciras.
I thought MSC's main port was Naples or Genoa? Interesting...my father is a business exec in the shipping industry and I occasionally travelled with him on his business trips when I was younger, especially London.
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