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Old October 30th, 2013, 04:52 PM   #161
thun
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Iirc, those huge transocean container ships often call in two or three European ports on each leg - e.g. Genova and Hamburg, so they can be fed by more systems (one for the Mediterranean and one for the North and/or Baltic Sea). Correct me if I'm wrong.
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Old October 30th, 2013, 06:15 PM   #162
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Usually container vessels use the Kiel Canal instead of going all the way round Denmark. Maybe that's the reason the big vessels don't go to the Baltic.
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Old October 30th, 2013, 10:05 PM   #163
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skymantle View Post
I thought MSC's main port was Naples or Genoa? Interesting...my father is a business exec in the shipping industry and I occasionally travelled with him on his business trips when I was younger, especially London.
That would make sense, since MSC stands for Mediterranean Shipping Company
But Antwerp is just the bigger port and, more importantly, a bit more centrally located for both transport over sea and over land. The vicinity of Germany is a very big advantage. The same thing is actually true for Rotterdam. Countries like Belgium and the Netherlands would be much poorer if they weren't so strategically located between Germany and the westcoast of Europe.

But it's certainly correct that the largest container companies have multiple hubs.
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Old October 30th, 2013, 10:42 PM   #164
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Quote:
Countries like Belgium and the Netherlands would be much poorer if they weren't so strategically located between Germany and the westcoast of Europe.
And those countries have access to the estuaries/deltas of the Maas/Meuse, Rhine etc which enables the transport of goods far into the European continent and industrial centres via barge, as shown in some of the photos earlier in this thread (although that was the Elbe but same principle).

The port of Marseille/Fos has the same advantage from the Mediterranean with the Rhone delta. I used to work with barges sending containers up all the way to Lyon, Macon and Chalon. They used to come back with, for example, containers loaded with some of the best Burgundy wines for export to foreign markets (I used to deal with the bills of lading so knew everything of what was in those boxes!).
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Old November 3rd, 2013, 02:32 AM   #165
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After coming back ashore there was a little visitor center with some interesting signs/maps:

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This shows in dotted lines the different routes and you can also see the island off the coast. To the right is the Elbe.

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Then we rode a bus back to Cuxhaven. Note the bus has video showing all the stations coming up. Makes riding the bus very easy even if you don't speak German. This is so far ahead of anything in the US it isn't even funny.

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Back in town.

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This light ship "Elbe" was built by Meyer Werft in Papenberg I think!!

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As Cuxhaven is right where the Elbe outlets to the North Sea there is a lot of ship traffic.

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This is where the Elbe flows out into the ocean. Lots and lots of ships heading to the huge port of Hamburg. by 600West218, on Flickr

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A ship pilot being taken out to guide the ships in. by 600West218, on Flickr

I guess the Elbe is not that easy to navigate as it looks like the ships all get river/harbor pilots.

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You can see it is quite a busy place!!

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This is an interesting contraption that looks like it was used to signal conditions to the ships.

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A strange looking ship. I'm not sure what it would be used for. It doesn't seem to have more storage space.

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The German Coast Guard. by 600West218, on Flickr

I was told this is the equivalent of the German coast guard.

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Apparently flooding during storms can be a problem here and the town has huge berms and flood gates going through it like this one.

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Ok, that is a short Venezuelan but still the gate is pretty big.

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More parts of the flood barrier.

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Someone pointed out that Germans love models - indeed they do. notice they even have a model wind turbine.

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I think that is a water tower but why would it have windows?

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Old November 3rd, 2013, 04:40 PM   #166
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 600West218 View Post
A strange looking ship. I'm not sure what it would be used for. It doesn't seem to have more storage space.
It's a small coastal fuel tanker, used for refuelling ships at sea. Basically just sails out, pumps 600 tons of fuel into another ship's tanks and returns to the fuel depot to restock afterwards. The company running that ship has three of about that size, one larger and three smaller ones, and also runs some fuel storage depots on land.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 600West218 View Post
I was told this is the equivalent of the German coast guard.
Buoy tender with secondary survey ship function for local duty. Can also be used for firefighting and assistance in oil spills etc. Catamaran build since that way it can survive being beached during low tide in the Wattenmeer.

Baumrönne isn't a part of the coast guard though, just one of about 300 work boats of the federal waterways agency - a midsized one, in service of the Cuxhaven branch agency. The four larger coast-guard-assigned ships of the waterways agency use the same livery (black with "flag" stripes), but with the word "Küstenwache" added to the side of the ship aft of the "flag".
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Old November 3rd, 2013, 05:41 PM   #167
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Thanks Kato - very informative.
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Old November 3rd, 2013, 06:20 PM   #168
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The next day, Sunday, was to be spent further exploring Hamburg, this time with the help of my CouchSurfing host. Actually, we didn't so much wander the city as see some very, very nice places.

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Sorry for this picture being blurry. Around Hamburg there are these markers in the sidewalks indicating where Jewish individuals or families once lived and what fate befell them under the Nazis. This was close to my hosts home and shows that a Jewish family lived there until they were sent to Auschwitz where they were murdered.

I think it was pointed out that these markers are not put there by the government but rather individuals can pay money to have them installed. Definitely a nice and important thing to do so that this extremely important history is never lost sight of or forgotten.

We took the Ubahn to the south eastern old port area of Hamburg - more or less close to where the train that brought me to Hamburg passed and also not far from the new Haffen City.

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An adverstisement for jobs at Airbus which has one of its largest factories in Hamburg and which I was to tour the next day.

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This indicates where we were.

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Interesting looking housing. But as I am not from Germany and not knowledgeable about housing there I can't date it or even say if it was pre or post war.

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Old warehouse/piers.

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A Confederate flag on a German car. Sort of interesting that they ban the swastika but they permit this...

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I was really fortunate that I had my host to bring me to this. You had to go to a very out of the way place, walking along roads without people and not many signs, in order to find it. I don't think I would have gotten here on my own.

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In the front of the museum - equipment for lifting containers.

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Museum of Work. That actually seems to be a separate museum located elsewhere but that has some exhibits here.

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Note the cool symbol for the port of Hamburg - the anchor over the fortress.

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Lotsssss of harbor cranes.

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Let me just say up front - this was one of the hilights of my trip to Germany and a really, really good museum. It was very different from the Maritime Museum that I saw the other day in all the ways I like. Rather than just being pictures and models (in fact, this had some pictures but almost no models) it was actually historical artifacts. Even better, it had VERY educational diagrams that explained all the workings of the port and the ships that go through the port. The explanatory diagrams were so good that even though they were in German I could still figure most of them out. Furthermore, although the sinage was almost exclusively in German the museum volunteers who also served as guides almost always spoke quite good english, were very helpful, and had a great knowledge of and enthuseasm for their museum. To me, this is exactly what any good museum should be like.

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Across the way there were piers and cranes that were still active in commercial work.

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What this place used to be like. As you can see, there were lots of large seagoing ships and lots of barges for river and canal transport. This harbor was where they met and exchanged goods.

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More relatively modern equipment.

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A diving mask.

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A winch aboard one of the ships.

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A maritime map of the harbor. Sorry the soundings are probably not readable.

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In the bowels of the ship.

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The smell of oil and lubricants was everywhere because oil and lubricants were everywhere. I have to admit, I like that aroma.

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Pistons and camshafts. I love all this precision machinery and steel and oil.

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Note what appear to be cables. They are not cables carrying electrical current. Rather, they are small pipes carrying lubricants - the life blood of this type of equipment.

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An old battery. Note the cut out to show fluid levels.

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Again, lots of pipes carrying lots of lubricants. These are all smaller than the diameter of your pinky finger.

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Lots of tools, just in case. When at sea if something breaks you can't just call for a tow truck or pull in to a convenient garage. Either you are able to fix it yourself, or you have a really big problem.
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Old November 4th, 2013, 02:06 PM   #169
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A bit late, but: Bremen harbour does not play a big role anymore. However, Bremerhaven harbour, which is located closer to the North Sea (and part of the state Bremen although separated from it), is one of the biggest harbours in Europe. That is also where all the cars go. Bremerhaven is the biggest car harbour in Europe and has one of the biggest container terminals. Cars are shipped from there to all over the world.

And thanks for all the nice pics!
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Old November 4th, 2013, 10:34 PM   #170
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Another very interesting tour!
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Old November 5th, 2013, 03:02 AM   #171
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Quote:
Originally Posted by telemaxx View Post
A bit late, but: Bremen harbour does not play a big role anymore. However, Bremerhaven harbour, which is located closer to the North Sea (and part of the state Bremen although separated from it), is one of the biggest harbours in Europe. That is also where all the cars go. Bremerhaven is the biggest car harbour in Europe and has one of the biggest container terminals. Cars are shipped from there to all over the world.

And thanks for all the nice pics!
That is very interesting. Thanks for the information.

When I was first planning the trip I was thinking of going to Bremerhaven. I did want to see the port there but time just didn't allow for it.

What you are saying does make sense. Interestingly I saw no ships for transporting cars in Hamburg.

Next time in Northern Germany I'll definitely hit Bremerhaven.
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Old November 5th, 2013, 04:35 AM   #172
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Note the barges and the mechanism for loading and unloading them.

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Note the screw mechanism that moves the entire base of the crane.

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More oil...

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This is a very clever device to clamp a train to the train tracks and not allow it to tip over. Note that the more upward force there is the more tightly clamps the rails.

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This is inside the main cargo hold of the ship.

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The cargo hold is covered by a tarp. The tarp is very securely fastened in place with these pieces of wood that are pounded into place.

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Given the need to do all your own repairs at sea her is a large replacement shaft.

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The top of the engine. Note the valves and rods in the bottom of the picture.

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Old November 7th, 2013, 01:01 AM   #173
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Not sure how I didn't find this thread before yesterday, but great work once again!
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Old November 7th, 2013, 04:33 AM   #174
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continueing further down the museum pier:

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I'm guessing the bell shaped devices are pivoted downward and then used to stabilize the car while it is used as a crane.

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As you can see the museum had quite a selection of cranes.

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Loading cargo the old fashioned way.

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Interesting how they use what look like concrete blocks as counter weights.

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From the end of the pier you could see across part of the harbor to where some very big ships were being worked on.

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Note the opera house under construction in the background.

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I hadn't previously noticed large ship borne cranes on container ships like the one on teh back of this ship. But it was being used to move around containers. I'm a bit surprised it was being used in a port where I would expect they would have better cranes available but...

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Going back towards the museum they had some actual containers on display.

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I guess some inspection certification from the U.S.

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I am a bit surprized at the different sizes. I would really think they would need them to be consistent.

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A very nice old building. It was attached to the warehouse/museum. I am guessing it was the administrative office of the warehouse.
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Old November 7th, 2013, 12:42 PM   #175
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Quote:
I hadn't previously noticed large ship borne cranes on container ships like the one on teh back of this ship. But it was being used to move around containers. I'm a bit surprised it was being used in a port where I would expect they would have better cranes available but...
Sometimes there are difficulties using shore cranes on a ship due to the particular configurations of the ship and the cranes. When this occurs it is generally restricted to a certain area of the vessel; therefore, the vessel might use its own cranes for discharging/loading boxes in that particular bay.

There is a vessel that I deal with, when it arrives in a particular port, where I don't plan containers to be loaded or discharged in the bay that is just in front of the accomodation, because there is a risk the cranes might strike it. This only applies when that ship is in that port (which has quite old-fashioned cranes incidently). That ship in other ports, or other ships in that port - no problem.
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Old November 10th, 2013, 03:42 PM   #176
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Hi 600 West 218,

seems you are obssed with everything industrial and industrila like.

Here are some more suggestions of me you may like and wanted to visit.

Berlin Underground
http://berliner-unterwelten.de/guided-tours.3.1.html

Möhntal-Reservoir
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C3%B6hne_Reservoir

Edersee-Reservoir
https://www.google.de/search?q=eders...w=1680&bih=904

Naval memorial
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laboe_Naval_Memorial

U-Boat at Naval Memorial
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unterseeboot_995

Military Museum Koblenz
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wehrtec...mmlung_Koblenz

Militay Museum of the German Army in Dresden
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bundesw...History_Museum

Car and Techniqe Museum
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinshei...Technik_Museum

Techniqe Museum Speyer
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technikmuseum_Speyer

German Museum
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deutsches_Museum

Coal Bagger
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bucket-wheel_excavator

Shipcanal
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weilbur...fffahrtstunnel

Locks of Germany
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kategor...in_Deutschland
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Old November 11th, 2013, 03:19 PM   #177
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Great list. I think there is something interesting for anyone in it.

In Nordrhein-Westphalen I can also recommend the Haus der Geschichte in Bonn for a very good insight in the history of modern (post-war) Germany.
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Old November 12th, 2013, 09:08 AM   #178
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Quote:
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I am a bit surprized at the different sizes. I would really think they would need them to be consistent.
Length and width are consistent (so you can stack any of them above each other), only the height differs. Standard containers (the lower ones) are 8'6" / 2.59m, "high-cube" containers are usually 9'6" / 2.90m. There are also - somewhat rare - "half-height" containers at 4'3" / 1.3m for transporting flat goods. The original specification called for 8' height (8' width / 8' height), which pretty much can't be found anymore.

The "high-cube" containers in your pictures are - like pretty much all high-cubes - marked with those small black/yellow warning stripes at the upper corners.
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Old November 12th, 2013, 09:16 AM   #179
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Great list. I think there is something interesting for anyone in it.
Since there's also places n South Germany in that list, i'd like to add that BASF in Ludwigshafen, largest chemical plant in the world, holds "open saturdays" every first saturday of the month where you can tour the factory (one-hour bus tour).
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Old November 20th, 2013, 10:07 PM   #180
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There is also a Mercedes Benz Museum an Daimler-Benz-Headquartet close to Stuttgart
and
a BMW-Museum in Munich at BMW-Headquater.

Miningmuseum Weilburg an der Lahn
http://www.museum-weilburg.de/seite/...baumuseum.html
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