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Old October 11th, 2013, 08:39 PM   #1
Copperknickers
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Which country has the friendliest suburb architecture?

As the title says: which country has the most liveable, friendly, desirable architecture outside the medieval villages and grand city centres? Which country is the best place to live for the ordinary small town dweller or city suburb dweller, in terms of the aesthetics of their environment?

With particular emphasis on the public housing and apartment blocks, where most low-earning urbanites live.


My top 5:

5. France

4. Denmark

3. Finland

2. Canada

1. Switzerland
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Old October 12th, 2013, 01:55 AM   #2
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I don't know about France. I think they have some problems in the suburbs, and ethnic enclaves etc.
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Old October 12th, 2013, 02:04 AM   #3
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Netherlands for sure! Just take a look at this thread

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=560898
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Old November 1st, 2013, 03:53 PM   #4
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My favourites are the UK and Belgium. RE France, there good suburbs and bad suburbs, there's no rule, but I have yet to visit a French city where I would live in the suburbs instead of living centrally. There simply is no comparison, the centres are just unbeatable. If I were to get tired of urban life I would rather move in a town rather than moving to the same city's suburbs.
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Old November 2nd, 2013, 02:46 AM   #5
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Netherlands for sure! Just take a look at this thread

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=560898
I completely agree.
This is my favorite: Brandevoort, Helmond

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Old November 3rd, 2013, 01:05 PM   #6
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where you park your car?
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Old November 3rd, 2013, 01:25 PM   #7
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where you park your car?
There are parking garages
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Old November 3rd, 2013, 06:18 PM   #8
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I completely agree.
This is my favorite: Brandevoort, Helmond

Are you ironic or what? If not, what exactly is so appealing? I can think of at least three major design flaws here.
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Old November 3rd, 2013, 09:35 PM   #9
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Good density, ground-level shops, limited car traffic and some nice architecture. Seems ok for me.
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Old November 3rd, 2013, 10:52 PM   #10
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Good density, ground-level shops, limited car traffic and some nice architecture. Seems ok for me.
Major flaws in no particular order:

1. The building heights protrude on eachother, making sunlight scarce in first and second story, particularly during winter months. This has a negative influence on the population, particularly way up north.

2. There are trees but they are not given ample of room for roots. They could have structural cells on this particular design even though I doubt it as they have not bothered to protect the trees from cars and traffic. In low-income neighborhoods designers often remove trees in order to reduce maintenance costs. There is also a prevailing attitude among designers to remove trees because they think that trees cause an addition in crime levels (because for example you can hide behind a tree and mug someone).

In reality, trees and vegetation has a negative impact on overall crime level (trees in a neigborhood reduce crime) and has an overall positive impact on the psychology of the population in the area. This is particularly important in a low wage neigborhood. This design does not really allow wider or taller trees than on this particular image even if you would fit it with structural cells.

3. The limited size of roads might reduce traffic but is not the proper way to reduce traffic as maintenance, movers and transports probably will use the narrow road anyway, thereby endangering both the trees and other installations such as the light posts. A more logical way to reduce speed or traffic is speedbumps and timed-, or limited access gates.
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Old November 4th, 2013, 10:40 PM   #11
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Thats all bullshit.

Forget all those modernist dogmas, this is proper classic town planning.
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Old November 4th, 2013, 10:59 PM   #12
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Thats all bullshit.

Forget all those modernist dogmas, this is proper classic town planning.
Yeah, when you have lived in a poor neighborhood in northern Europe, have been mugged a few times and getting depressed by the seasonal shifts of light I will refer to your quote the time you complain.

Architects should be forced into living in the buildings they design.
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Old November 5th, 2013, 08:59 PM   #13
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Yeah, when you have lived in a poor neighborhood in northern Europe, have been mugged a few times and getting depressed by the seasonal shifts of light I will refer to your quote the time you complain.

Architects should be forced into living in the buildings they design.
I do live in northern europe and the poor areas are the modernist ones not suited for people just for an idea.
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Old November 7th, 2013, 01:45 AM   #14
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I do live in northern europe and the poor areas are the modernist ones not suited for people just for an idea.
So your point is what, that light is not important in the wintertime, that trees are unnecessary or that the people that lives in the buildings should pay for the mistakes that the architects make (hence paying for new trees that gets roughed by traffic)?
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Old November 7th, 2013, 04:35 AM   #15
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Spain has the most walkable neighborhoods due to mixed-used zones and density. There are stores, coffes and restaurants in any street. Spanish way of life is a street way of life
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Old November 7th, 2013, 07:37 AM   #16
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Belgium, Netherlands & Denmark.
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Old November 7th, 2013, 09:52 PM   #17
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Quote:
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So your point is what, that light is not important in the wintertime, that trees are unnecessary or that the people that lives in the buildings should pay for the mistakes that the architects make (hence paying for new trees that gets roughed by traffic)?
Light is not the most important thing no. If you want light you go out maybe to a park where there also is plenty of trees.

Lining uo houses to face the sun like the modernist ideal advocates does not create a better enviroment for people, just a broken city structure with larger distances for people to walk. Thats an especially big problem in the cold north.
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Old November 7th, 2013, 10:00 PM   #18
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So your point is what, that light is not important in the wintertime,
There is no light during the winter in Northern Europe regardless of how you plan the neigbourhood.
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Old November 8th, 2013, 07:05 PM   #19
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Quote:
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Light is not the most important thing no. If you want light you go out maybe to a park where there also is plenty of trees.

Lining uo houses to face the sun like the modernist ideal advocates does not create a better enviroment for people, just a broken city structure with larger distances for people to walk. Thats an especially big problem in the cold north.
Adding a few meters does not break city structure (usually the reason why you are not allowed to build tall buildings too close to your estate limit) and yes, it does provide with more light. If you do not believe me, go to Sweden in December and measure it for yourself. Neither does it constitutate a problem to walk a few extra meters, that has to be the most absurd argument I have ever heard.

To the contrary to your argument: one of the most common argument for not building taller buildings in Stockholm is that the heights protrude on the other buildings and reduce light to the lower stories. It is also by coincidence the lower stories that tend to be occupied by lower income residents. The only way to circumvent this type of situation is to extend the distance between the buildings and thereby reducing the density.
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Old November 8th, 2013, 07:26 PM   #20
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Quote:
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Adding a few meters does not break city structure (usually the reason why you are not allowed to build tall buildings too close to your estate limit) and yes, it does provide with more light. If you do not believe me, go to Sweden in December and measure it for yourself. Neither does it constitutate a problem to walk a few extra meters, that has to be the most absurd argument I have ever heard.
Dahlis already lives in Stockholm, Sweden.
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To the contrary to your argument: one of the most common argument for not building taller buildings in Stockholm is that the heights protrude on the other buildings and reduce light to the lower stories. It is also by coincidence the lower stories that tend to be occupied by lower income residents.
That probably has more do with noise from the road and noise from commercial space that is often at street level.
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The only way to circumvent this type of situation is to extend the distance between the buildings and thereby reducing the density.
Yet the areas where we those ideas have been adopted suffers from social problems are generally perceived to be less desirable in comparison with districts that are built with traditional closed blocks, which is why all Scandinavian countries are trying to go back to closed blocks when building new and modern districts.
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