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Old November 12th, 2013, 02:30 AM   #1
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SOUTH EAST FLORIDA | Transportation Alternatives

Discussing possibilities for a comprehensive transportation system for SE Florida, specifically Dade, Broward and Palm Beach Counties and making them a more cohesive urban region.
I consider mass transit as something more than getting people to work in the major city centers during rush hour. Mass transit is connecting a region and offering a complete alternative to using a car, not just getting to work.
It is great that the FEC right-of-way will finally be used as a passenger rail since Florida's entire east coast was originally developed along the tracks. The centers of the most densely populated communities lie along the FEC right-of-way. Unfortuntely it will only serve as a commuter rail not mass-transit. The "All Aboard Florida" line to Orlando, and maybe later the "Coastal Link".
This "AAF" just doesn't seem like they are taking mass transit seriously. Using a short heavy-rail retrofitted train will seriously handicap the possibilities. It will be a surface line, meaning it will be blocking every east-west artery along the coast everytime it passes. This will limit the frequency of the trains.It will bypass dozens of neighborhoods. It is inflexible.

The FEC right-of-way could be the catalyst for redefining how Florida develops. Dade, Broward and Palm Beach Counties could gain the ability of having transit-oriented development countering the sprawl that defines Florida now. The region along the FEC right-of-way consists mostly of under-valued, lght-industrial garage type buildings interspersed with commercial, retail and low end apartment buildings. It could be a continuous corridor of transit-oriented, walkable, sustainable growth, green developments.

There is enough room along the right-of-way to accomodate up to 8 or 9 rail lines but now mostly consists of 1 or 2. The proposed "AAF" will be sharing the freight lines. With the addition of train tunnel to Port Miami, there will be a lot more traffic. There will be more rail lines added. Adding a light-rail line corridor within the FEC corridor would open up many more possibilities. Also adding a continuous wide Bike Trail within the corridor lined with a wide tree-lined promenade. The corridor would actually become transformed into a lush GREENWAY disguising it's use as simply a railroad but as an integral resource for the future of SE Florida. Ther must be an alternative to the car if this region is to fully develop and grow. The days of endless sprawl must be quelled.

Light-rail is more flexible. It can ascend and descend at a much greater rate allowing it to virtually hop over major arteries as opposed to blocking them but would need to be elevated the entire length, simply over the intersection (in most cases). Light-rail also has the ability of continuing onto a street whether with an exclusive lane or shared with cars.
I consider South Dade pretty well served with MetrRail, tho it does need to be extended and not given over to MDX Toll Monster. (Metro-Dade Expressway)

These thoughts are my own and not based in any real proposals. This thread is for discussing what could be done and discussing the inefeciencies of the existing system and current proposals for Dade,

Broward and Palm Beach Counties.


Coral Heights, Oakland Park


City Center, West Palm Beach


Downtown Fort Lauderdale


The Design District, Miami


Downtown Miami
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Old November 12th, 2013, 02:31 AM   #2
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To start I want to expose, what I believe to be, the largest waisted resource of all of Florida, the underutilized FEC right-of-way. It is a rail corridor that, in most cases has 1 or 2 rail lines when it could accommodate 8 or 9. It most definitely can accommodate a pair of LIGHT-RAIL lines, a 12' wide Running/BIKE-TRAIL and a wide PROMENADE where appropriate, all enclosed in a lush GREENWAY.

Morningside Neighborhood of Miami

Using the FEC right-of-way as a catalyst for introducing a greener approach to development. Adding a Light-Rail Station, a Running/Bike-Trail enclosed in a lush GREENWAY extending through the neighborhood creating new parks and public spaces and consolidating existing private open spaces to become part of a greater good. Promoting a walkable, pedestrian-friendly, higher density TRANSIT-ORIENTED sustainable spine through an already popular residential neighborhood. Using denser SMART-GROWTH policies to try to keep the existing residential district in tact

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Old November 12th, 2013, 02:31 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoconutOne View Post
We really have to go through this again?

First and foremost, Miami, Ft. Lauderdale and West Palm are NOT one big urban region, nor will they ever be. You have ~70 MILES in between Miami and West Palm. No urban region extends 70 miles away from a city center. PBC, Broward and Miami-Dade are a METRO area. BIG DIFFERENCE.

Commuter rail (Tri-Rail) IS mass transit, and is used in this region for the specific purpose (mostly) of getting people to work. That is the whole point of commuter rail- provide an alternate to commuting via private auto.

People in West Palm or Ft. Lauderdale are not going to travel all the way to Miami to go shopping, out to eat, etc. Why would anyone go 70 miles on a train to go to the grocery store when I have one .5 miles from my house??

You are sold on the thought that "light rail" is something special and different which can solve transit problems in one swoop which is cannot. Light rail is no different from "traditional" trains except it has less capacity, possibly different fuel, and slower speeds than heavy or commuter rail. This whole "hop over intersections" bit is just complete nonsense.

The whole idea just makes absolutely zero sense.
There is a continuous ~70miles of consistant urban fabric from Miami to West Palm Beach. Some areas are denser than others, but the entire length along the corridor can ALL be considered an urban fabric. This may not fit your ideal of what an "urban region" is. It is just a fact. It may be 70 miles between Miami and West Palm but it is not 70 miles between West Palm + Pompano Beach, or Boca + Wilton Manors, or Morningside + Fort Lauderdale Airport. All commuter-rail is mass-transit. All mass-transit is NOT simply commuter rail. It would serve a larger function. Did you read my opening post?

There are dozens of city centers along this corridor. The whole point was to connect communities that right now have no other way of going from one to another other than by car. That is sort of the point. This is a system that does more than just getting people to work in Downtown Miami or to Downtown Fort Lauderdale. It's about getting from point A to point B without a car. This corridor provides the simplest, straightest, exclusive traffic-free right-of-way that already exists and sits practically untapped. Some refer to this as a megalopolis.

I'm sorry you feel "we have to go through this again". We don't.

People in West Palm or Fort Lauderdale might not be looking to travel to Miami to go shopping or eating, but might consider going to Aventura, Wilton Manors, Hollywood, Pompano, N Miami, Boca or Oakland Park. If done correctly, each community could benefit

I am sold on Light-Rail because it is my preferance. It can climb steep grades and go over major arteries without having to be totally elevated. I'm not sure why you don't believe light-rail is no different than regular trains and can not easily go over roadways. Traditional trains can not, at least not without a very very long approach. The fact that each east-west artery will stop eveytime the train will pass limits it's frequency.
It would make 1/3 the stops that a bus makes but nearly 3 times as many as AAF. I feel the more communities that are being served will bring that much more Transit-Oriented Development oppportunities. The stations can be as simple as a platform or as complicated as the over the top TriRail stations. I would like to see the light-rail work with the AAF. Local and express during rush.

There are other options that will work, like a busway and there are newer technologies coming out that might replace the light-rail theory. The important thing is that this right-of-way be used to the best advantage to the community and be used to introduce a denser more sustainable TRANSIT-ORIENTED style of community development. I prefer Light-Rail. I have lived with it. I've studied many other regions that are using it and building it. I have lived in many cities with complete transit systems in place. This region is lacking and the AAF will under serve this region.

There is not a gap in the urban fabric between West Palm and Miami and all these communities should be serviced and be included. It is not just getting to work, it is a true car alternative. All these communities are swelling with population and probably will continue to do so. There are regions half our size with more transit plans than we are even entertaining.

My purpose here is to expose the waste of an underutilized right-of-way and show a different perspective in it's use as well as the wastefulness of Florida's LAND-USE policies. You can disagree with me but do not speak to me as if you are more aware of the situation or more enlightened to the solutions that exist.

The AAF is a band-aid on a gun shot wound. The only gap in the urban fabric I see IS the FEC corridor. It consists of undervalued real estate in the heart of every community along it. It appears as a scar. I envision a corridor through the heart of this expansion that would be the one area that will offer an alternative to the endless strip mall sprawl that is SE Florida. A corridor that already lies at the heart of so many of SE Florida communities. Creating walkable, sustainable, mixed-use areas the entire length of this corridor. A corridor that can respond to each community it passes through and not just pass them by. I keep seeing untapped possibilities. I'm sorry you don't. Please don't feel the need to continue your tirade.

Not sure why you feel the need to repremand me (yet again) for sharing my thoughts but I do hope you will refrain. It is clear to me that you have limited knowledge of mass transit and have probably never taken it (or will). You have a preconceived, myopic idea as to what an "Urban Region" is. There is no nead to clarify, I'm not really interested.

Your opinions "makes absolutely zero sense". Your tone implies that you need to approach me as if you have some expertise (which is eluding me) to the problem and how dare I disagree with you, which is puzzling to me. Ok, I get it. You don't agree with me. I have written it down. CoconutHead does not agree with me. You can move on now.
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Old November 12th, 2013, 02:33 AM   #4
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Aventura, reassessed for a Light-Rail line the FEC GREENWAY with a Running/Bike-Trail. West of the FEC corridor becomes a transit-oriented development. The mall becomes a denser community development, as the trens goes across the country that mlls are becoming more than shopping but actually developing rsidential and commercial. The streets acquire a better pedestrian feel with traffic easing ameneties. Distinctive pavements highlighting crosswalks and intersections. Existing green spaces become more invitng public spaces and used for biking/jogging/ walking and more than just a landscaped buffer.



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Old November 12th, 2013, 02:34 AM   #5
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Bay Pointe Light-Rail station @ NE 46th Street Miami. With the introduction of a Light-Rail station, A lush GREENWAY with a continuous running/bike trail helps trnsform the area into a green, more pedestrian friendly neighborhood. Introducing an area master plan using existing open areas into a cohesive park system. Tree-lined streets connect existing parks. The median of Biscayne Boulevard is so wide it can be used as a linear park. Bay Pointe circle becomes a Dupont Circle like center and showpiece of the community. Public/private cooperation can include open spaces around existing commercial building to create office-in-the-park atmosphere. Distinctive pavements highlight crosswalks and intersections. NE 4th Avenue and Federal Highway become tree-lined extensions of the FEC GREENWAY creating a wide canopy

Looking south down the wide vacant FEC right-of-way toward Downtown Miami




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Old November 12th, 2013, 02:36 AM   #6
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County Line Light-Rail Station. West Park. Serving the busy congested county line of Dade/Broward at Gulfstream Park. The area west of the FEC rail line is a mostly pleasant residential neighborhood. East of the FEC corridor to Gulfstream Park is an area targeted for large development. Most homes and small apartment buildings have been leveled in wait of the next building boom.
A Light-Rail station, GREENWAY and continuous Bike-Trail would be a great catalyst to instigate a new Transit-Oriented sustainable community. Promoting tree-lined streets and New-Urbanist policies. Reassessing surrounding lands for a denser pedestrian friendly development allowed due to the addition of a transit line.



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Old November 12th, 2013, 02:37 AM   #7
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Port Side Light-Rail Station elevated over Marina Boulevard. Reassessing then transforming an industrial district, mostly airport service lots and light industrial garages, into a new mixed-use, pedestrian-friendly, Transit-Oriented community. A new neighborhood catering to specific demographics of people who work or frequent the Airport and Port Everglades. Perhaps a more transient cosmopolitan group that require being near the Airport, cruise ships and the Port. Port Side Station will be a single stop away from the Airport. It is amazingly a blank canvas considering the location. Sandwiched between Snyder Park and Federal Highway and between Marina Boulevard and I 595 and the Airport. It will have direct access to all freeways and the beaches, as well as 4 stations to the center of Fort Lauderdale.







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Old November 12th, 2013, 02:39 AM   #8
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LET'S CREATE JOBS IN AMERICA. NOT SOMEWHERE ELSE
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Old November 12th, 2013, 02:41 AM   #9
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United Streetcar, has sold Made in the USA streetcars to Portland, Oregon. The company uses 200 suppliers in 20 states employs and employs union iron-workers
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Old November 12th, 2013, 02:41 AM   #10
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LET'S CREATE JOBS IN AMERICA. NOT SOMEWHERE ELSE.
#buyamericanmadeintheusabringbackamericanjobs
(From The American Society of Civil Engineers)
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?...type=3&theater
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Old November 12th, 2013, 02:42 AM   #11
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Portland Light-Rail System

The MAX system currently consists of four lines, each designated by a color.

Blue Line: Hillsboro – City Center – Gresham[11]
Green Line: Clackamas – City Center – Portland State University[12]
Red Line: Portland International Airport – City Center – Beaverton[13]
Yellow Line: Expo Center – City Center – Portland State University[14]

The MAX system was built in a series of five separate projects, and each line runs over one or more of the previously opened segments. The use of colors to distinguish the separately operated routes was first adopted in 2000[10] and brought into use in 2001. The 2004-opened Yellow Line originally followed the same routing in downtown Portland as the Red and Blue lines, along First Avenue, Morrison Street and Yamhill Street, but it was shifted to a new alignment along the Portland Transit Mall on August 30, 2009, introducing light rail service along the Mall. The Green Line began serving the Mall on September 12, 2009.

The system currently has a total of 87 stations. 51 stations are served by the Blue Line, 28 stations by the Green Line, 29 by the Red Line, and 22 by the Yellow Line, with 40 stations served by two or more lines and 8 by three. The system's central stations are at Pioneer Courthouse Square, on the Portland Transit Mall. All four lines pass through the Rose Quarter and cross the Steel Bridge.

Trains run every 15 minutes from early in the morning Monday through Friday until late at night, while weekends consists of every 18 minutes. The Blue Line runs every 10 minutes during rush hour. Headways between trains are shorter in the central section of the system, where lines overlap. Actual schedules vary by location and time of day. At many stations, a live readerboard shows the destination and time-to-arrival of the next several trains, using data gathered by a vehicle tracking system.
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Old November 12th, 2013, 02:43 AM   #12
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The Dallas Area Rapid Transit authority (or DART) is a transit agency based in Dallas, Texas. It operates buses, light rail, commuter rail, and high-occupancy vehicle lanes in Dallas and 12 of its suburbs. With the extension of the Orange Line to Belt Line station at the edge of DFW Airport on December 3, 2012, DART is the largest light rail operator in the United States, with 85 miles (136.8 km) of track.

Average daily ridership for DART has been in the vicinity of 200,000 riders per day over the last couple decades. In the 1st quarter of 1998, DART's weekday ridership averaged 211,000 riders per day system-wide. Total ridership numbers have risen and fallen since then; total ridership, including Trinity Railway Express ridership, has been as high as 248,500 average weekday riders in the 3rd quarter of 2008, and as low as 194,700 average weekday riders in the 1st quarter of 2010. However, after a year-long study in 2012 that counted passenger counts through both the existing manual method and a new automated counting system, DART concluded that it has been underreporting rail ridership by more than 15 percent each year. In the 4th quarter of 2012, DART reported total ridership of 252,900 weekday riders on average.

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Old November 12th, 2013, 02:44 AM   #13
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American Light Rail Systems
by length

Dallas 85 miles 61 stations
Los Angeles 71 Miles 65 stations
Philadelphia 60 miles 68 stations
San Diego 54 miles 53 stations
Portland O 52 miles 87 stations
Toronto 51 miles 70 stations
Denver 47 miles 46 stations
Saint Louis 46 miles 37 stations
Salt Lake City 45 miles 50 stations
San Jose 43 miles 62 stations
Sacramento 39 miles 50 stations
San Francisco 36 miles 120 stations
Baltimore 33 miles 33 stations
Calgary 33 miles 43 stations
Camden/Trenton 29 miles 20 stations
Pittsburgh 27 miles 53 stations
Boston 23 miles 66 stations

Houston MetroRAIL









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Old November 12th, 2013, 09:47 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SEFTA View Post
To start I want to expose, what I believe to be, the largest waisted resource of all of Florida, the underutilized FEC right-of-way. It is a rail corridor that, in most cases has 1 or 2 rail lines when it could accommodate 8 or 9. It most definitely can accommodate a pair of LIGHT-RAIL lines, a 12' wide Running/BIKE-TRAIL and a wide PROMENADE where appropriate, all enclosed in a lush GREENWAY.
I've wondered about building commuter railways based upon the Japanese model. There a number of companies in Japan, e.g. Keio, Odakyu, that evolved from the equivalent of interurban railways. I don't know how you would even describe them; "commuter rail" does not quite fit since they are not like the commuter lines in the US I've ridden, many of which only provide rush hour service. In Japan they are known as "Dentestu" which roughly means electric railway. They typically operate at 1500 VDC, run on a variety of gauges (not an issue because they don't interchange train traffic which each other, and I've not seen any that have freight service).

The railways seem to be one component of the company, in which real estate and department stores play prominent roles. They almost seem like what our interurbans might have evolved into. Some of them can also run over subway lines, and they can include a number of grade crossings, in particular around the station, but most highways seem to be grade separated from the railways.

The railways can operate a variety of services on a two track line. On the Keihan railway between Osaka and Kyoto I've seen lengthy sections of twin track that operate local, express and limited trains. The only stretches where four tracks are needed is the stations where express trains stop. Typically what will happen is that a local will come into the station first and pull to the outside track in its direction, followed shortly by an express, you then have a rush of traffic between the two trains, and then the express leaves, followed by the local.

Branch lines will normally have a separate train that you transfer too, an example being if you wish to go to Uji on the Keihan. Going to Takao on the Keio is similar, but on weekend some trains will continue on down the branch line catering to hikers. I'd like to see us be able to develop this type of railway.
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Old November 13th, 2013, 04:55 AM   #15
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the FEC right-of-way transforms Oakland Park. Adding 2 Light-Rail Stations, Coral Heights Station between Prospect Road and Floranada Road, and the Commercial Boulevard Station. The entire surrounding district rezoned to promote & create a walkable, transit-oriented GREEN development. The streets will be tree-lined with wide sidewalks and pedestrian/bike amenities. Distinctive pavements highlighting crosswalks and intersections. The FEC right-of-way becomes a GRENWAY that houses the rail lines, the light-rail lines, running/Bike Trails all disguised a lush, linear park. A new cnter will be created



Existing area consists of mostly single story, garage-like light-industrial warehouses surrounded by dense residential areas surrounded by commercial sprawl.

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Old November 13th, 2013, 05:15 AM   #16
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Oakland Park Boulevard Light-Rail Station and Jaco-Pastorius Park Light-Rail Station, along with the FEC right-of-way's conversion to a lush GREENWAY with running/Bike Trail (in red) revamps Downtown Oakland into a denser urban center. Tree-lined streets, wide sidewalks and many pedestrian and bicycle amenities. Traffic reconfigured to promote ground level restaurant/retail on Dixie Highway as well as NE 12th Avenue, office as well as residential on upper floors. Transit stations allowing for a denser form of development promoting walkable, mixed use, transit-oriented neighborhoods. Infusing new life into Downtown Oakland Park with mid-rise development around Oakland Park Boulevard



existing corridor










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Old November 13th, 2013, 06:23 AM   #17
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Connecting the north Fort Lauderdale communities, Middle River Terrace, Poinsettia Heights & Wilton. Reassessing undervalued properties along the FEC right-of-way with Light-Rail,Running/Bike Trails as well as the FEC rail lines all camouflaged as a lush GREENWAY. Creating a walkable community with tree-lined streets, new parks and public spaces



Wilton Manors


Poinsettia Heights Light-Rail Station @ NE 17th Street Fort Lauderdale




Middle River Terrace Light-Rail Station
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Old November 13th, 2013, 07:09 AM   #18
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Holiday Park Light-Rail Station @ Sunrise Boulevard. 2 stations to Downtown Fort Lauderdale's Broward Boulevard Light-Rail Station. 8 stations to FLL Airport. The FEC right-of-way transforms area into GREEN denser, walkable, pedestrian-friendly, Transit-Oriented community. Wide tree-lined sidewalks. Distinctive pavements highlighting crosswalks and intersections. Reconstruct Sunrise Boulevard and Federal Highway, both, into tree-lined boulevards with wide sidewalks and creating a street wall, opposed to strip malls. Medians lushly landscaped





NE 8th Street transformed into a GEENWAY connecting Holiday Park to the tri-county FEC GREENWAY
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Old November 13th, 2013, 07:35 AM   #19
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Lemon City Light-Rail Station, Miami. Using the FEC right-of-way into a lush GREENWAY connecting existing parks and creating new parks and public spaces

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Old November 13th, 2013, 07:36 AM   #20
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North Miami Boulevard Light-Rail Station. Transforming area into a cohesive GREEN community using the FEC right-of-way as a lush GREENWAY camouflaging the FEC rails, a light-rail line and a running/Bike Trail. Recreate the area with tree-lined streets. Distinctive pavements highlighting crosswalks and intersections.

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