daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > General Urban Developments > DN Archives



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old September 30th, 2005, 09:38 PM   #61
The Urban Politician
The City
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 5,934
Likes (Received): 21

^ Nobody's disagreeing with you.

Any super-accelorator lab or major high-tech office park is going to be built in suburbia regardless, so I'll take Chicago's suburbia over another city's.

But damn it, I still really hate spawl.

And I also hope the tech-incubator/office district being developed at IIT's campus will also be successful in attracting companies. I like it because it will fill up some empty land in that part of town and will also provide some much needed jobs there. Also, it's not sprawl--I've seen the designs and it looks alright, and it's right next to a Green Line station.
The Urban Politician no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old September 30th, 2005, 10:32 PM   #62
wickedestcity
BANNED
 
wickedestcity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,566
Likes (Received): 26

Vincentians construct affordable home for seniors

By PAUL STORER



(Center) Bishop Stanley G. Schlarman blesses a new Society of St. Vincent de Paul apartment complex for senior citizens Sept. 25 in West Chicago.



WEST CHICAGO—An assortment of members of the Joliet diocesan council of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul along with supporters of the lay Catholic outreach society and community members gathered outside the entrance of the society’s new senior apartment complex Sept. 25 near downtown West Chicago. Spectators watched and applauded as Bishop Stanley G. Schlarman cut the ceremonial ribbon, marking the opening of the new affordable housing development for senior citizens in DuPage County.

While dedicating and blessing the new building, the bishop praised the society for their commitment to DuPage County senior citizens in need of affordable housing assistance. “I’m privileged to be here to bless this place,” he said to the people gathered. “I’m happy to pinch-hit for (Bishop Joseph L. Imesch),” he added. Speaking on behalf of the leader of the seven-county Joliet Diocese, Bishop Schlarman congratulated the society for their efforts in the creation of the new facility.

Situated in residential West Chicago, the 16,000-square-foot, two-story apartment complex features 17 one-bedroom apartment units as well as a parlor for residents along with a community craft room, laundry room and kitchen, said John Beaty, president of the Joliet diocesan council of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. “We’ve spared no expense” to make the building safe, he added, talking about onsite security controls and systems in every apartment for instant communication with emergency services.

Addressing the people gathered for the dedication ceremony, Beaty praised the members of the society’s building committee as well as representatives from the city, state and county for their assistance. Obtaining the financial backing for the enterprise took nearly a decade, he said, noting that the society raised one-third of the funds for the $2.5 million project and garnered the remainder from representatives from DuPage County and the state of Illinois.

Describing the lengthy planning and development stages before the ceremony, Beaty explained that decades earlier members of the society had acquired four lots nestled on a one-acre parcel of property in the heart of West Chicago. “We wanted to do something with those lots for the poor,” he said. Surveying residents of DuPage County, the members of the society discovered that seniors were in need of affordable housing in West Chicago and surrounding communities. The results indicated that many people on a fixed income couldn’t afford sky-high rent and utility costs along with expensive medications, he added.

Promptly deciding to create an affordable housing development for seniors, members of the society began acquiring building permits and financial grants. In the meantime, Michael Fortner, mayor of West Chicago, suggested a property trade with the faithful group, mentioned Beaty. Ultimately accepting the mayor’s proposal, the group secured a comparable section of land in a more residential area on McConnell Avenue in West Chicago.

The original planned site of the apartment complex was located in the middle of the city’s business district, according to Fortner. “It just wasn’t an ideal place for a housing development for seniors.” Following the ceremony, the mayor said, “This is a great project.” He also praised the tenacity of the members of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul.

While the current market rent of an apartment home in West Chicago is over $700 per month, the elderly residents of the new Society of St. Vincent de Paul complex would only pay $535 per month, according to Beaty, a member of St. Margaret Mary Parish in Naperville.

“We’re not trying to make any profit,” said George Rudnicki, a member of the society’s building committee. Addressing the people gathered for the dedication, he praised committee members and others associated with the project for devoting their time and talents to the endeavor. He mentioned that many volunteers were experienced in engineering, accounting and interior design and worked hand-in-hand with the architects and contractors.

About six residents are expected to move in Oct. 1 when the building opens for operation, noted Rudnicki, a member of St. Dennis Parish in Lockport. Those slated to be served are residents 62 years old and over with annual incomes of $24,000 and lower, he said, describing the guidelines for living in the complex. Two seniors could theoretically live in one unit, he added, noting that the overall capacity is 34 residents.

Andrew Jaworski of Chicago-based HarleyEllis architecture firm was on hand for the special dedication and blessing ceremony. The architect for the project noted that each 560-square-foot apartment unit includes bedroom, kitchen and living space. He said that the units were designed to be easily converted into handicap-accessible living quarters upon request. Outside amenities include a patio, deck and porch, added the veteran architect.

During his formal remarks, Deacon Thomas Thiltgen of Corpus Christi Parish in Carol Stream explained the mission of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. The spiritual director for the Joliet diocesan council of the society mentioned that members of the 30 parish conferences across the diocese offer outreach service “to those who are needy and suffering.”

Members and volunteers are currently operating six thrift stores throughout the Joliet Diocese. Proceeds benefit poor residents, Deacon Thiltgen said. In 2004, members of the international Catholic lay organization served nearly 700,000 people across the globe.

Members typically offer basic services, including clothing, furniture and financial assistance, “but this is unique,” said Deacon Thiltgen, talking about the Joliet diocesan group who for the first time delved into the realm of home construction. “We have a tendency to forget about the elderly. We need to help them,” he added following the ceremony.



(Center) Bishop Stanley G. Schlarman blesses a new Society of St. Vincent de Paul apartment complex for senior citizens Sept. 25 in West Chicago

wickedestcity no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2005, 10:42 PM   #63
The Urban Politician
The City
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 5,934
Likes (Received): 21

^Dude, we don't need to be posting stuff about every little development. Especially something out in the suburbs that isn't even particularly urban
The Urban Politician no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2005, 10:55 PM   #64
wickedestcity
BANNED
 
wickedestcity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,566
Likes (Received): 26

yeh true, i just remember descusing the senior living a week ago and i though this would add to it
wickedestcity no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2005, 11:24 PM   #65
spyguy
Expert
 
spyguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 6,916
Likes (Received): 97

Hastert is bringing it home for HIS home town especially. Take a trip there one day and you'll see all the new construction going on.
spyguy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 8th, 2005, 08:40 PM   #66
spyguy
Expert
 
spyguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 6,916
Likes (Received): 97

spyguy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 26th, 2005, 03:48 AM   #67
ThirdCoast312
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: north side
Posts: 229
Likes (Received): 0

City Endorses Zoning Change for North Lawndale Plans
By Mark Ruda
http://www.globest.com/news/399_399...o/139503-1.html
Last updated: October 24, 2005 03:35pm

CHICAGO-Five parcels in the 700 block of South Kedzie Avenue will be developed with market-rate and affordable housing, but the size of the project has yet to be set. New West Kedzie, LLC, the only developer to answer a request for proposals to build on the five properties totaling nearly 1.6 acres, is weighing plans calling for a 60-unit or 77-unit project.

New West Kedzie, LLC originally planned a 100-unit, $21.2-million project in August 2004, when it agreed to city-owned lots in the North Lawndale community for $1 million. New West Kedzie still is in line for a $3-million tax increment financing subsidy, according to Joseph Lopez of the Department of Planning and Development, to help offset the cost of setting aside 20% of the units for buyers qualifying under the city’s affordable housing initiative.

Regardless of the number of units, New West Kedzie needs a zoning change to allow for a project more than 50% larger than allowed. The plan commission recently endorsed the change, which would allow for a 126,000-sf development.

One-bedroom units would sell for $130,000 to $145,000, while the discount for affordable units would reduce the price to $103,000 to $105,000. Two-bedroom units would be priced from $195,000 to $215,000, but the discount for the affordable units would reduce prices to $110,000 to $119,000.

Plan commission members noted the prices, even for the market-rate units, could be considered affordable when compared to the overall market. “Given the community dynamics in Lawndale, these price points are more affordable,” Lopez adds.

The 77-unit proposal includes one single-family home, 22 three-unit buildings and 10 townhouses. The 60-unit plan includes seven three-unit buildings and 39 townhouses.
ThirdCoast312 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 30th, 2005, 06:03 PM   #68
Chi_Coruscant
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 879
Likes (Received): 0

Interesting reading!

From Chicago Crain's Mag webpage:
West Side void: Ogden Ave.

1968: North Lawndale sustained severe damage when rioters torched and looted the area after Martin Luther King Jr.'s death.
North Lawndale has been a tough place to do business for 40 years. In 1966, economic conditions in the West Side community were so grim that Martin Luther King Jr. picked the predominantly black ward as the base for his northern U.S. civil rights movement. After Mr. King's assassination two years later, angry mobs torched area homes and many white-owned businesses. Most factories and businesses quickly fled, and North Lawndale's residents have for decades battled crime, poverty and urban blight.
Yet in the past three years new hope has flickered. To attract investment and businesses, the city has pumped millions of dollars into North Lawndale's infrastructure, including a $6-million fire station and a $10-million police headquarters. The community's CTA Blue Line stop has gotten a $16-million publicly funded renovation. Encouraged by that public spending, pioneering speculators and developers have snapped up vacant lots and built higher-end homes like the townhouse development at the corner of Ogden and Albany avenues adjacent to Douglas Park, where units sell for $350,000 a pop.
But the 41,000-resident neighborhood, which is five miles west of the Loop, still lacks a real commercial strip. Its Ogden Avenue thoroughfare is a patchwork of overgrown lots, community centers and churches. So in April, city planners solicited offers for mixed retail and residential developments on 60 sites scattered along a three-block stretch of Ogden between Albany and Pulaski Road.

In a sign that nothing is ever easy for this impoverished area, the city got only three proposals. It rejected all of them.

WHAT INVESTORS NEED
Developer interest in the city's plan was tepid at best — three hardly makes a crowd when it comes to commercial real estate bidding. More importantly, though, these investors were apparently unwilling to embrace the Ogden project on the city's terms. All three bidders — Holsten Real Estate Development Corp., Royal Imperial Group Inc. and the non-profit Lawndale Christian Development Corp. (LCDC) — demanded major public investments in the infrastructure of Ogden, such as road and sidewalk improvements.
That's not all they wanted. LCDC and Holsten also asked the city to add tax-increment financing (TIF) to the incentives already on the table, namely land writedowns, enterprise zone funding and market tax credits.
After rejecting all three proposals last month, the city said it was investigating the "possibility" of TIF funding, a process officials say could take up to two years to put in place. Once construction time is factored in, the promised renaissance of Ogden Avenue could be a long way off.
"It's not uncommon for the city to reject RFPs if they don't accomplish our goals," says Constance Buscemi, spokeswoman for the city's planning department. "We are looking at broadening the scope of the plan to have a greater impact on the community," Ms. Buscemi says.
Specifically, she says the city is considering making more public money available, by means of a TIF district, to improve the roads, the street lighting and signs and for "other upgrades."
It could be another five or more years before this part fo North Lawndale gets any kind of commercial strip, says Peter Skosey of the Metropolitan Planning Council, a non-profit agency that put together much of the research material for prospective bidders.
Part of the immediate problem, according to Peter Holsten, president of Chicago-based Holsten, was that the city misjudged the demand for so-called "market-rate" housing in that hardscrabble pocket of North Lawndale, which made the development too risky. "The presumption that people will buy market-rate housing in this area is a little ambitious given the state of the housing around Ogden," Mr. Holsten says.
"You're not going to get some yuppie to buy a condo on the corner of Central Park and Ogden," he says. "Market people are fickle. If it doesn't look appetizing, they're not going to buy."

2005: The area has struggled to attract residents and businesses. "Lawndale is a very challenged neighborhood that is slowly getting better, but it's not there yet," says Peter Holsten, president of Chicago-based Holsten Real Estate Development Corp.

WHAT NORTH LAWNDALE NEEDS
To make the low-income neighborhood more appetizing to investors, start with affordable housing, Mr. Holsten says. "You need to build critical mass in a low-income neighborhood, then higher-income people will come in because they feel safe."
The city's vision for the Ogden development was based on a blend of market-rate and affordable housing, but the $63-million development proposal submitted by Holsten called for all 200 units to be affordable housing, with the city shouldering 52% of the cost.
"Lawndale is a very challenged neighborhood that is slowly getting better, but it's not there yet," Mr. Holsten says. Without a TIF, there wasn't enough funding to make the deal work."
For its part, Chicago-based real estate company Royal Imperial Group was concerned that the project might be a hard sell with retailers, in part because they would be setting up shop in virgin territory, but also because the ward's hundreds of vacant lots means fewer consumers. Moreover, the average household income is just $18,000 a year.
"The demographics are not great. It's not a high-density area," says Mordechai Tessler, president of Royal Imperial Group.
"Retail needs to be near retail," Mr. Tessler says. "The first one is always more difficult." Royal Imperial's bid was rejected because it did not meet the city's "design requirements," according to a planning department report, but Mr. Tessler says the company remains interested in the project. "We're great believers in the potential of the West Side."
This latest failure to develop Ogden Avenue has left plenty of frustration. Says Mr. Holsten, "The alderman needs to get in there and jump up and down." (Alderman Michael D. Chandler (24th) did not respond to requests for comment for this article.)
"We're caught between a rock and a hard place," says Eric Strickland, executive director of the Lawndale Business & Local Development Corp. "Lawndale has all the right kind of assets. It's close to Midway Airport and is a short train ride from downtown. It's just a matter of time before it really (takes off), especially with the city expanding west the way it is," he adds.
Maybe so. But North Lawndale residents have heard that promise before. This economic renaissance, at least along desolate, downtrodden Ogden Avenue, will have to wait.


1968: North Lawndale sustained severe damage when rioters torched and looted the area after Martin Luther King Jr.'s death.

The area has struggled to attract residents and businesses. "Lawndale is a very challenged neighborhood that is slowly getting better, but it's not there yet," says Peter Holsten, president of Chicago-based Holsten Real Estate Development Corp.
Chi_Coruscant no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 30th, 2005, 07:01 PM   #69
The Urban Politician
The City
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 5,934
Likes (Received): 21

Quote:
Royal Imperial's bid was rejected because it did not meet the city's "design requirements,"
^That's right--you bring us plans for a strip mall, and you're getting sent back to the drawing board
The Urban Politician no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 31st, 2005, 02:08 AM   #70
pottebaum
Minneapolis
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 2,032
Likes (Received): 4

How is Austin? Aren't they getting the Walmart?
pottebaum no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 13th, 2005, 08:35 PM   #71
ThirdCoast312
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: north side
Posts: 229
Likes (Received): 0

http://www.chicagotribune.com/busine...i-business-hed

This outdoors store is big. Really big. Really, really big.

By Mike Hughlett
Tribune staff reporter
Published November 13, 2005


ROGERS, Minn. -- Tom Mackie got a shopping list from his hunting buddies before he set out on the 123-mile trek from his home in the northwestern Wisconsin woods to this Minneapolis suburb.

His friends knew he was making a pilgrimage to Cabela's. And to the outdoors crowd--those into hunting, fishing or just feeling woodsy--Cabela's is a shrine.

The store mates big-box retail with old-fashioned spectacle. There's a "library" of rare guns. A 35,000-gallon aquarium stocked with native fish. A virtual zoo of stuffed critters: bears, deer, elk and so on. And for the kids, and a few adults, too, a shooting gallery.

The Chicago area may get a taste of Cabela's: The fast growing Nebraska-based chain is planning stores in Hammond, Ind., and Hoffman Estates.

To land a Cabela's, both cities are planning to pony up millions of dollars in tax breaks.

Tax breaks to retailers have long been controversial. But communities such as Hammond and Hoffman Estates justify them in Cabela's case because the firm's stores typically become tourist attractions.

"It definitely is a destination," said Rick Nelson, a Chicago-based stock analyst for Stephens Inc. He counted 21 different state license plates in the parking lot of the last Cabela's he visited.

"The brand has a cult following in the outdoor sector," Nelson said.

Cabela's, which went public in 2004, has 14 stores and expects to open four more next year, including one in Richfield, Wis., near Milwaukee.

Neither the Hammond nor the Hoffman Estates store is a done deal, and it's not clear whether Cabela's will proceed with both.

If either community succeeds it will be home to a store that offers up everything from fishing rods to women's sweaters to jumbo bags of beef jerky (a snack for the hunting shack). And it will be supersized.

The store in Rogers, Cabela's newest, is 188,000 square feet, the same size as the average Wal-Mart Supercenter and four times as big as a large Best Buy store.

Last weekend the Cabela's in Rogers was teeming. Traffic into its parking lot was so heavy that several Cabela's workers served as flagmen to keep things running smoothly.

Mackie, a retired industrial arts teacher, arrived in the early afternoon. He had driven from Spooner, Wis., meeting up with his son Rob, a theater company carpenter who lives in Fargo, N.D.

Together at Cabela's they were preparing for the Nov. 19 opening of Wisconsin's deer hunting season.

Their shopping cart was brimming: blaze orange jackets, hand warmers, ammunition, even a new gun for "black powder" hunting. "It makes you a better hunter," Tom Mackie said of the black powder rifle, a modern variant of the muzzleloader.

Mackie has been hunting for 48 of his 60 years, and he handed on the tradition to his son. Sure, they could've geared up for deer season a lot closer to home. But they wanted an outing.

"I never knew there were that many types of antelope," Rob said as he looked up at a herd of mounted heads.

The Cabela's in Rogers has about 400 items of taxidermy. "Conservation Mountain," a two-story concrete mountain complete with waterfalls, is studded with 100 full-size animals in various reposes.

The "African Diorama," a savanna setting, features 46 more, including lions and kudus. "Stuff that you watch on television, here you get to see in real life," Tom Mackie said of the displays.

Neil Stern, a retail consultant with Chicago's McMillan/Doolittle, called Cabela's "part museum, part entertainment complex, part store."

Few other retailers take the spectacle approach to Cabela's level, Stern said. But one that does, Bass Pro Shops, just happens to be Cabela's biggest competitor.

Bass Pro is also expanding, often with the help of tax breaks. The company, which already has a store in Gurnee, is planning two more area outlets, one in Bolingbrook, another in Portage, Ind.

Cabela's and Bass Pro are essentially packaging and selling the outdoors experience. To do that successfully on such a large scale they must appeal to "the guy who does hunt and fish and those who want to look like they do," Stern said.

Range of customers

In other words, they need to build a big enough tent for everybody from Lenny Carlson to Laurie Marchetti.

Carlson, a land surveyor, and his 12-year-old son Cody were checking out a portable ice-fishing house last weekend at the Rogers Cabela's. They sat inside the tentlike shelter, testing the cushy-ness of its padded bench.

When you spend a day sitting on a frozen lake, as ice fishers do, "it's got to be comfortable or it's not worth it," Lenny said.

Fishing. Hunting. Camping. Carlson, who lives in the nearby suburb of Ramsey, embraces them all, and regularly. "Everything I do is here," he said, motioning to the store beyond the ice house.

Marchetti, a dental hygienist, admits she's not much of a hunter or fisher, but she does like the outdoors. Last weekend at Cabela's, Marchetti bought a pair of shoes for herself and a jacket as a Christmas present.

She and a friend, both from Wheaton, Minn., near the South Dakota border, drove to the Twin Cities to see a Vikings football game and to visit Cabela's.

"We have to cover the whole store. It's our mission to check it out," Marchetti said outside the furnishings department, where a cabin motif rules and deer-antler light fixtures and wildlife art are plentiful.

"They have some fabulous Terry Redlin prints over there," Marchetti said, referring to the well-known outdoors painter.

Marchetti and Carlson were making their first trips to Cabela's in Rogers, but they have visited the company's store in Owatonna, Minn., a city 65 miles south of Minneapolis.

The Owatonna store, built in 1998, was one of the first Cabela's outlets beyond the company's original location in Sydney, Neb. Initially, Cabela's located its stores in non-metropolitan areas like Owatonna.

Now it's putting stores closer to big cities. The reason: to be closer to customers and to counter competitors like Bass Pro, which also have metro area stores, analysts say.

Wherever Cabela's builds a store, analysts say, the decision is based on extensive research of its customer database.

Cabela's, founded in 1961, has long been known for its mail-order catalog. Even today, direct sales--via the catalog and the Internet--are the company's anchor. In the first nine months of 2005, direct sales were 67 percent higher than in-store revenues.

The company plants its stores where catalog sales are high, analysts say. And wherever Cabela's wants to go, it is often welcomed with a generous subsidy package, usually involving tax breaks.

For a store in Buda, Texas, Cabela's reportedly got a total incentive package of $61 million. In Ft. Worth it was about $40 million, and in Hamburg, Pa., $27 million.

In Hoffman Estates, incentives could reach $40 million, including infrastructure improvements and tax breaks.

Hammond is putting together a $65 million deal, including local property tax and state sales tax incentives, said Edward Krusa, a consultant working for Hammond. The city part of the deal is done; now Cabela's is negotiating with the state.

The $65 million price tag includes benefits for businesses expected to locate near Cabela's. Hammond anticipates that another 400,000 square feet of retail space, including hotels and restaurants, will spring up near Cabela's, Krusa said.

Those projections are based on businesses that have sprouted near Cabela's stores in other states.

Cabela's has made a commitment to Hammond. Earlier this month, it bought--for $14 million--the Woodmar Country Club and its 93 acres. Cabela's plans to put a store there, and sell much of the land for retail development.

Krusa said he believes Cabela's is likely to choose only one site in the Chicago area. "We understand there is still a horse race between Hammond and Hoffman Estates."

California-based retail expert George Whalin agreed, saying Cabela's is probably trying to see where it can land the best tax incentive deal.

Cabela's spokesman John Castillo said the company is planning stores at both sites.

Tax breaks controversial

Tax breaks for retailers like Cabela's have long been controversial because they are seen more as redistributing wealth within a region, rather than creating it.

Theoretically, the perfect business to subsidize is one with sales predominantly outside of the region in which it is located--like a car factory. Retailing, though, tends to be a predominantly regional business. Subsidizing one retailer in a region can hurt another one nearby.

Officials in cities like Hammond and Hoffman Estates justify incentives for Cabela's because it draws so many people from beyond the regional market.

Cabela's estimates that its metro-area stores will still draw 50 percent of their customers from beyond a 100-mile radius.

Tax incentives are important for Cabela's, said several analysts.

"It's one of the things that makes [its stores] work economically," said Whalin, president of Retail Management Consultants.

Stephens Inc.'s Nelson agreed. "It certainly helps return on capital for the stores."

Cabela's outlets cost $40 million to $80 million to build; the Hammond store will reportedly cost $78 million. Whalin said a Wal-Mart would probably cost less than half that much.

The higher costs stem from Cabela's various displays. Also, those displays gobble up space that would normally be devoted to merchandise, thus pushing down sales per square foot--an important measure in retailing.

For all of Cabela's push to build more stores, and for all of the cities salivating over the company, investors appear to want Cabela's to slow down a bit. That's the conclusion of stock analyst Chris Svezia at Susquehanna Financial Group in Bala Cynwyd, Pa.

Cabela's stock debuted close to $25 a share in 2004 but has fallen to about $16 in the past few months.

Investors are worried that the number of new outdoors stores--Cabela's, Bass Pro and others--is growing at a much faster clip than demand for their products, Svezia said.

Meanwhile, Cabela's sales at stores open at least a year--another important measure in retailing--have been declining. Wall Street wants more than anything to see the company address that weakness, Svezia said.
ThirdCoast312 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 14th, 2005, 03:16 AM   #72
The Urban Politician
The City
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 5,934
Likes (Received): 21

Taking a stand for affordability

By Ed Finkel


Fifty-seven lower-income families and several locally owned small businesses



The building depicted in this rendering will be built on the southeast corner of Division and California in the next year, on what's now a gravel lot where Bickerdike Redevelopment Corp. hosted a groundbreaking for its La Estancia development on Oct. 20.


will be able to stay in Humboldt Park no matter how ferocious gentrification becomes thanks to the mixed-use La Estancia along Division Street.

Developer Bickerdike Redevelopment Corp. hosted a groundbreaking ceremony on Oct. 20 at the southeast corner of Division and California, on what's now an empty lot (see sidebar for details on its three locations). On that corner there will be a 30-unit apartment building with arched-window storefronts at street level. Two other buildings will rise on Division just west of Kedzie, also with a mix of apartments and stores.

"We have come a long way in the effort to take the responsibility to stabilize our community. We will not be

A crowd of about 150 residents, business owners and other supporters cheered the groundbreaking for La Estancia, the first mixed-use development undertaken by Bickerdike Redevelopment Corp.


In addition to Bickerdike and NNNN/HPEP, the Division Street Business Development Association (DSBDA) is also helping to promote the project, a key plank of the NCP Quality-of-Life Plan in Humboldt Park.

The housing-related strategy at the center of that plan aims to preserve affordability for current residents, who face the possibility of being pushed out of a neighborhood in which their families have lived, in some cases, for generations.


"This is a place for working families. This is a place where we provide them an opportunity to stay in their community," said Alderman Billy Ocasio (26th) of La Estancia, on which Bickerdike is working in partnership with Near Northwest Neighborhood Network/Humboldt Park Empowerment Partnership (NNNN/HPEP) and Division Street Business Development Association (DSBDA).


But they know what has happened in Wicker Park and Bucktown to the east, and they have attempted to make a stand through affordable housing and the Puerto Rican-themed Paseo Boricua, which stretches along Division from Western Avenue through California Avenue. The Paseo has built a lively atmosphere and record of success with bakeries, shops, and the space that hosts the arts-oriented youth group Batey Urbano.

Judith Diaz and Janeida Rivera of that group received a roaring reception during the groundbreaking ceremony by performing hip-hop-style poems – one in English and one in Spanish – that gave the youth perspective on gentrification and other issues affecting Humboldt
Chicago Housing Commissioner Jack Markowski, shown chatting with Bickerdike Executive Director Joy Aruguete, praised Bickerdike for its devotion to the Humboldt Park community -- and its reliable record of development.

On this breezy Thursday morning the site at 2753 W. Division St. had nothing but gravel and a small patch of dirt with about a dozen shovels, with attached lettering that spelled out L-A E-S-T-A-N-C-I-A, which literally means "place to stay" but loosely translates as "the stand."

But in about a year, the location will be the anchor building for the project, located at the west end of the Paseo. The building will be architecturally tied to the rest of the Paseo through decorative archways on the commercial spaces that recall the Puerto Rican flag archways at both ends of the street as well as wrought-iron
La Estancia also will include this building at 3220 W. Division ...



Window framing similar to that which adorns many Division Street businesses.

Both draw from Spanish colonial architecture found throughout Puerto Rico, said Raul Echevarria, NCP outreach worker.

The 57 apartments total at the three sites will be rental units aimed at families earning 50 percent or less of the area median income. Each will have off-street parking, in-unit laundry, central air and high-speed Internet wiring. Rents will range from $497 to $770 per month.

Figures from the Chicago Rehab Network show that more than one-third of renters in Humboldt Park currently pay more than 35 percent of their income in rent.



... and this building at 3248 W. Division, both of which will feature ground-floor retail and three stories of apartments affordable to those earning 50 percent of the median income.


"This is a place for working families. This is a place where we provide an opportunity for them to stay in their community,"said Ald. Billy Ocasio (26th), who recalled that he once received a proposal for a 30-unit, high-end condominium building on the same site -- a concept that drew a chorus of boos from the 150 or so people in attendance.

The commercial space will be marketed and managed by DSBDA. "This community is making it happen," said Enrique Salgado, executive director of DSBDA. "All of us on Paseo Boricua welcome it." The project will create "more businesses on Division Street that cater to us – not [sell] a $5, $6 cup of coffee."


The ends of the Paseo Boricua, a Puerto Rican-themed stretch of Division Street from California through Western avenues, are draped with Puerto Rican flag archways.

Bickerdike Executive Director Joy Aruguete thanked "the many [organizations and individuals] who made this a reality," including Ocasio, NNNN/HPEP and the DSBDA as well as several funders.

These include the city departments of Housing and of Planning and Development, the Illinois Housing Development Authority, J.P. Morgan Capital Corp., the National Equity Fund, Northern Trust Co. and LISC.

"La Estancia is a truly collaborative initiative," she said, adding that it's also Bickerdike's first mixed-use development after building 1,000 units of housing in 38 years. Construction will be handled by Humboldt Construction Co., a subsidiary of Bickerdike.


The youth-oriented arts group Batey Urbano is a mainstay of the Paseo Boricua.

Department of Housing Commissioner John Markowski said the development would be his department's tenth project with Bickerdike over the last 20 years. He praised the agency for keeping a strong community perspective and being a reliable affordable housing developer.

"That's why all of these funders and investors are willing to participate. We all know these developments are going to be well built, on budget and well managed over time," he said. "We know that redevelopment is coming. We have to make sure we provide affordability for people who have been here for the long term."


Teenage poets from Batey Urbano youth group electrified the crowd with their staccato critiques of gentrification.

A handful of protesters at the corner of Division and California expressed opposition to the project.

The ceremony closed with the speakers and other area leaders donning Bickerdike hard hats for the symbolic churning of the dirt, which prompted applause, cheers and a shout of "Viva La Estancia!"

"We have hit a grand slam. The Sox need us on Saturday," Medina said jokingly, on the eve of the World Series. "This is a celebration of one of the most extraordinary accomplishments this community has been able to put forth."
The Urban Politician no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 14th, 2005, 04:44 AM   #73
NWside
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Chicago
Posts: 454
Likes (Received): 2

These type of developments that TUP posted make me more excited then any DT project. These three particularly interest me due to the dominant opposition of ANY new housing project that may deal with gentrification in the Puerto Rican community ( trust me I've gone to meetings, when in favor of any new development I was almost chased out of the room). When I was younger Bucktown was predominantly Puerto Rican and Mexican, so you could understand the residents fear of them being priced out in the near future... Still I don't see any problem with these projects and hopefully they'll bring some more needed life to this stretch of Division.

Last edited by NWside; November 14th, 2005 at 04:57 AM.
NWside no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 20th, 2005, 10:10 PM   #74
The Urban Politician
The City
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 5,934
Likes (Received): 21

Park's popular, so is its neighborhood
The blocks around Garfield Park and Conservatory are attracting developers and home buyers.

By Jeanette Almada
Special to the Tribune
Published November 20, 2005

West Sider Clifton Cooper remembers "there was time when we couldn't get developers to cross Western Avenue. They didn't see potential" in his neighborhood, known for its namesake Garfield Park and Conservatory, which have attracted visitors from outside the neighborhood.

Now the blocks immediately surrounding the park and conservatory, refurbished by the Chicago Park District, are attracting developers and home buyers.

As president of the East Garfield Park Coalition, Cooper consults with developers building in the area, he said in an interview this month.

Roughly 30 percent of the land on blocks immediately around Garfield Park are vacant, according to Ald. Ed Smith (28th), who says that since 1994 when the Chicago Park District began making improvements to the 185-acre park, its lagoon, conservatory and surrounding streets, developer investment has steadily increased.

"We are now getting to a point where we can be selective," Smith said in an interview at City Hall earlier this month. "We are trying to use those improvements, and improvements to [Washington and Warren Boulevards], and to the Green Line station as a catalyst that will draw a mix of development to the area. We are looking for mixed-income and commercial projects to go up on blocks around the conservatory," Smith said. The CTA's "L" station was relocated to Central Park Avenue and Lake Street so passengers can walk to the conservatory.

The city owns most of the vacant lots in the area, Smith said. "Because of the improvements to the Green Line, which is near Washington and Warren Boulevards, the vacant lots on those two streets are now all earmarked for development," Smith said.

Developer Mike Clarke has been building residential projects in the area for the last four years. "That neighborhood is one of best kept secrets in city," said the president of Clarke Construction LLC. "East Garfield is a little like Bronzeville," he said. "It's been put down for so long and now it is coming back."

Clarke recalls how he got into the neighborhood. "A gentleman who lived in the area was moving to back to Tennessee and approached me about buying his land. A woman told me, `Don't buy there, that area is rough,'" he said. Since then Clarke has built several condo projects that sold out quickly, and a 50-unit apartment building.

Clarke has scheduled spring construction for the 33-unit Homes of East Garfield, on Washington and Warren between Central Park and Western Avenues. Sixteen of the single-family homes and 2-flats will be built under the Chicago Department of Housing's New Homes for Chicago Program. He plans to sell the affordable homes for $190,000 to $240,000, with market-rate homes starting near $300,000.

"In spring we will also start building a 7-unit condo building at 3301 Washington Blvd., [starting at $220,000], and six townhouses at Warren Boulevard and Sacramento Avenue that will start at $325,000," Clarke said.

The ambience of Washington Boulevard and the improvements to the park and conservatory drew Chicago developer Herb Eck to the area. "We think all those improvements are an indication that things are changing in the area for the better," he said. He and partner Michael Silver, a developer and builder with Chicago-based In/Site Architecture, are building Washington on the Park, a development of three-flats at 3315-25 W. Washington.

Like Clarke, Eck and Silver worked closely with Cooper and members of the East Garfield Coalition. The coalition pushes for developments that complement the historic masonry housing stock that survived the decades of under-investment, Cooper said. "We really want single-family houses and townhouses to go up on these vacant lots, but if they want to build condos. We try to get them to at least build those condos in a building that looks like a single-family residence," Cooper said.

Silver designed buildings "that look like single-family homes, 3 1/2-story masonry buildings with mansard roofs," Eck said. "Each building will have a duplex unit on the first floor and basement level, and simplex units on the second and third floors." Pre-construction prices start at $249,900 and $274,900, Eck said.

At Conservatory Manor, 102 N. Hamlin Ave., a firm headed by Chicago developer Bernard Berry is converting a 41-unit single-room-occupancy hotel into 19 condos. The 2- and 3-bedroom condos are being sold for $120,000 to $279,000.

Ald. Smith expects that conservatory traffic will create momentum for economic development -- business for mom-and-pop shops that he hopes will open up on scattered lots throughout the neighborhood.

Meanwhile, the attention has increased area land value. "I think that in the last four years that I have been building in this neighborhood," Clarke said, "the cost of vacant land has gone up about 35 percent."
The Urban Politician no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 21st, 2005, 12:34 AM   #75
Chi_Coruscant
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 879
Likes (Received): 0

I just passed by Garfield Park this afternoon. I was pleasantly surprised of the changes in that area. It used to be a scary area to drive through, years ago. Now, there are some new housings scattered all over. Garfield Park is grateful enough to have Mike Clarke. Hopefully, there will be more developers with courage and visionary like Clarke in helping that area as the residential boom is stretching westward from the Loop.
Chi_Coruscant no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 21st, 2005, 10:58 PM   #76
NWside
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Chicago
Posts: 454
Likes (Received): 2

Senior, Affordable Housing Plan Wins Endorsement
By Mark Ruda
Last updated: November 21, 2005**08:13am


CHICAGO-Hispanic Housing Development Corp. has a date next month with the Illinois Housing Development Authority, when it hopes to obtain one more piece of financing needed for a $23-million affordable and senior housing project in the 2600 block of W. North Avenue. Plans to build 56 affordable rental units for senior citizens as well as renovate a four-story warehouse to create 27 more affordable units were endorsed Thursday by the plan commission.

In addition to more than $2.4 million in tax increment financing as well as money from the city’s department of housing, Hispanic Housing Development hopes to use low-income housing tax credits to finance about 65% of the cost of the project, according to vice president of development Mark Kruse.

Hispanic Housing Development is not using money from the city’s affordable housing fund, however, as its plans have been in the works before the pool of money was created, an attorney for the group says.

Nonetheless, gentrification of the Humboldt Park area has increased the need for affordable housing. “This neighborhood has undergone an amazing transition,” says 1st Ward Alderman Manuel Flores. “It highlights and emphasizes why we need this type of housing here. You’re not only providing affordable housing, but also senior housing.”

The affordable units are being built on five parcels totaling 1.1 acres. The warehouse at 2646-54 W. North Ave., which has been described as “a hotel occupied by pigeons,” will be preserved and renovated. The new construction will be added to lots from 2634-44 W. North Ave. Hispanic Housing Development has spent $2.6 million to acquire most of the sites it needs for the project, according to property records.

http://www.globest.com/news/418_418/.../140384-1.html
NWside no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 22nd, 2005, 01:39 AM   #77
pottebaum
Minneapolis
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 2,032
Likes (Received): 4

Quote:
Originally Posted by TUP
Park's popular, so is its neighborhood
The blocks around Garfield Park and Conservatory are attracting developers and home buyers.
Music to my ears; a neighborhood with tons of vacant land is finding itself on the rebound..with a rail station being one of the main catalysts. Fantastic!
pottebaum no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 23rd, 2005, 09:00 PM   #78
ThirdCoast312
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: north side
Posts: 229
Likes (Received): 0

found in the op-ed section of the trib today


Preserving Pilsen

Published November 23, 2005


For more than a century, the Pilsen neighborhood on Chicago's Southwest Side has served as a port of entry to thousands of immigrants lured by the promise of well paying jobs. German and Irish workers first settled the community in the 1840s. The Slovaks-- who gave the community its name--became the dominant group for most of the 20th Century. More recently, Mexican-Americans have come to call this neighborhood home.

But no matter the group's origin, Pilsen has welcomed wave after wave of immigrants who have come to realize the promise of this country through hard work. Their pride can be seen in the ornate stone facades of buildings along 18th Street and in the brick and frame two-flats that give the community its sturdy feel.

Each group has added to the neighborhood. The early stoneworkers left behind their opulent handiwork in the architecture. The lively culture of the Mexican-American people is now evident in restaurants, shops and the Mexican Fine Arts Museum.

The neighborhood, and the Mexican-American community as a whole, is in flux again. But for the first time in Pilsen's history it isn't a new immigrant group arriving. This time it is gentrification and what a recent study called "Latino suburbanization" that is changing the neighborhood's role as a port of entry.

These changes have prompted Ald. Daniel Solis (25th) to seek state and federal landmark status for the Pilsen and adjoining Heart of Chicago neighborhoods. He will go before the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency in early December to ask that the area be made the state's largest historical district. If state officials approve, 3,987 properties could be eligible for historic status. He also seeks to put the neighborhood on the National Register of Historic Places. All this is designed to encourage families to stay and invest in Pilsen.

State landmark status would freeze property taxes for eight years for the owner of a home, building, condo or cooperative if the owner lives in the structure. To qualify for the tax break, the owner would have to spend 25 percent of the property's assessed value on improvements.

After eight years, property taxes would rise gradually. If a dwelling was sold during the eight-year period, the tax benefit would not be transferred to the new owner.

The proposal has the backing of City Hall and local community groups, such as The Resurrection Project, the 18th Street Development Corp. and the Pilsen Neighbors Community Council.

The metropolitan Chicago area is changing rapidly. Hispanics are the largest racial or ethnic group and many new Hispanic immigrants are choosing the suburbs rather than the city, according to a new study by the Institute for Latino Studies at the University of Notre Dame.

More Hispanics now live in the suburbs than in the city. And those 862,000 Hispanic suburbanites have impressive economic muscle, the report concluded. From 1990 to 2003, the aggregate household income for Chicago-area Hispanics increased from $5.8 billion to $20 billion. About a third of the Hispanic households have incomes of $60,000 or more and one in five have incomes of $75,000 or more.

From 2000 to 2003, nearly half of the total number of people who bought owner-occupied homes in the metropolitan area were Hispanic.

Solis and other leaders of Pilsen understand that they are in an intense competition with the vast Chicago region for immigrants, old and new. They have a solid proposal to encourage people to live, work, raise families and spend in their neighborhood.
ThirdCoast312 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 24th, 2005, 02:19 AM   #79
Frumie
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 717
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by ThirdCoast312
found in the op-ed section of the trib today


Preserving Pilsen

Published November 23, 2005


More Hispanics now live in the suburbs than in the city. And those 862,000 Hispanic suburbanites have impressive economic muscle, the report concluded. From 1990 to 2003, the aggregate household income for Chicago-area Hispanics increased from $5.8 billion to $20 billion. About a third of the Hispanic households have incomes of $60,000 or more and one in five have incomes of $75,000 or more.

From 2000 to 2003, nearly half of the total number of people who bought owner-occupied homes in the metropolitan area were Hispanic.

Solis and other leaders of Pilsen understand that they are in an intense competition with the vast Chicago region for immigrants, old and new. They have a solid proposal to encourage people to live, work, raise families and spend in their neighborhood.
Apparently Solis sees this shift diluting the Hispanic political clout, making this a cool move.
__________________
You truly want peace? Be righteous.
Frumie no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 28th, 2005, 03:01 PM   #80
Chi_Coruscant
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 879
Likes (Received): 0

Condo Developers Buy Parking Lot Adjacent to United Center
By Mark Ruda (http://www.globest.com/news/421_421/.../140527-1.html)
Last updated: November 23, 2005 01:59pm

CHICAGO-One of the remaining parking lots used by Bulls and Blackhawks fans is being sold to a group planning to put up an eight-unit condominium building. A partnership will pay the city $169,100, the appraised value, for a 2,487-sf lot at 1641 W. Warren Blvd., which it will combine with an adjacent 5,000-sf site to build its $3-million project.


“This is the first step in moving the parking lots closer to the United Center,” says 27th Ward Alderman Walter Burnett, before the land sale was endorsed Tuesday by the community development commission. “It’s been an eyesore on that block.”


It also was a site the city did not realize it had for several years, Burnett adds. Red Top Parking, a local company that rents parking spaces on lots for sporting events, had been using the lot with the mistaken belief it owned the property, he adds.


Three-bedroom, two-bath units ranging from 1,600 sf to 2,000 sf, and priced from $350,000 to $450,000, will go up on the site about three blocks from the United Center, says department of planning and development project manager Kimberly Cook. However, the plans by 1641 LLC, led by Victor Hotel developer Frank DiBuglione, drew criticism from community development commission member Anne Kostiner, a former developer on the Near West Side. Specifically, Kostiner criticized plans by architect and investor Antonio Fanizza that called for the rear of the building to be clad in cinder block, rather than face brick.


“We need to change that,” Kostiner says. “There is a $1.1 million profit here. So there’s no reason at all not to bring it up a step.”

The partnership has lined up $2 million in financing from Amcore Bank. The 5,000-sf site at 1637-39 W. Warren Blvd., owned by DiBuglione, was acquired last year for $400,000, according to property records. The site includes a 1,914-sf building that will be razed.
Chi_Coruscant no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 05:59 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium