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Old February 23rd, 2017, 01:32 PM   #3501
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Parrano, Umbria

Parrano by Luca, su Flickr

Italy_Parrano_hilltown-1904 by Erik Schmitt, su Flickr

Parrano 018 by artnbarb, su Flickr


Passeggiata de sanctis [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or CC BY 2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5)], by Avicenna07 at it.wikipedia (Transferred from it.wikipedia), from Wikimedia Commons


Via xx settembre [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or CC BY 2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5)], by Avicenna07 at it.wikipedia (Transferred from it.wikipedia), from Wikimedia Commons
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Old February 24th, 2017, 05:41 PM   #3502
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Cool video of the Amalfi's Coast ( plus few shots of Rome)

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Old February 27th, 2017, 05:14 PM   #3503
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Grotte del Caglieron, Fregona - Veneto

grotte del caglieron by diego gasparotto, su Flickr

Grotte del Caglieron by marco beni, su Flickr

GROTTE DEL CAGLIERON by Ste.Kost.78, su Flickr

Grotte del Caglieron by Valerio B, su Flickr

Grotte del caglieron by andrea sbabo, su Flickr

Grotte del Caglieron-9 by Luigi Ziliotto, su Flickr

Grotte del Caglieron, Italy by veggiefriend, su Flickr
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Old February 27th, 2017, 07:57 PM   #3504
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Milano, Lombardia

The new Citylife Complex developments.
Citylife milano_citylife_torri_2.jpg by Exentriq App, su Flickr

One skyscraper is completed , the second one is about to be completed and for the third one works of construction just started.

CityLife, Milano by Alessandro, su Flickr

Lo Storto, il Dritto by Alessandro, su Flickr

CityLife, Milano by Alessandro, su Flickr


And this is the new Porta Nuova District by night:
Senza titolo by Alessandra Weitzmann, su Flickr
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Old March 2nd, 2017, 11:10 AM   #3505
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Great art in Ravenna , Emilia Romagna UNESCO World Heritage Site


Battistero Neoniano


The Baptistery of Neon (Italian: Battistero Neoniano) is a religious building in Ravenna, central Italy. The most ancient monument remaining in the city, it was partly erected on the site of a Roman bath. It is also called the Orthodox Baptistery to distinguish it from the Arian Baptistery constructed on behest of Ostrogothic King Theodoric some 50 years later.

The octagonal brick structure was erected by Bishop Ursus at the end of the 4th or beginning of the 5th century, as part of his great Basilica (destroyed in 1734). The baptistery was finished by Bishop Neon at the end of the 5th century, at which time the mosaic decorations were added. The original floor is now some 3 meters underground, so the proper structure and extent of the building can no longer be seen. The octagonal design of the building, employed in virtually all Early Christian baptisteries, symbolizes the seven days of the week plus the Day of the Resurrection and Eternal Life.

The ceiling mosaic depicts John the Baptist baptizing Jesus (depicted with beard) standing waist high in the Jordan River. To one side stands the personification of the Jordan river, with a reed in one hand and a garment in the other. A procession of the twelve apostles proceeds around the center mosaic in two directions, ending with Saint Peter meeting Saint Paul.
The Baptistry is one of the eight structures in Ravenna registered as UNESCO World Heritage Sites. According to the ICOMOS evaluation of this patrimony, "this is the finest and most complete surviving example of the early Christian baptistery" which "retains the fluidity in representation of the human figure derived from Greco-Roman art".


Battistero Neoniano esterno [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], di Dorff (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons


Wide angle view - Neonian Baptistry - Ravenna 2016 [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], di José Luiz


Battistero Neoniano 5th Century conversion of a Roman bath-house. by John Maloney FSA Scot, su Flickr

Ceiling - Battistero Neoniano - Ravenna by Tony Wasserman, su Flickr

Ravenna - Bishop Neon 'Orthodox' Baptistery c500 - ceiling mosaic detail by edk7, su Flickr

Battistero Neoniano, Ravenna by Dan, su Flickr

Inside Battistero Neoniano by Ilya Burlak, su Flickr
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Old March 2nd, 2017, 11:25 AM   #3506
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Great Art in Ravenna, Emilia Romagna UNESCO World Heritage Site

Mausoleo di Galla Placidia

The Mausoleum of Galla Placidia is a Roman building in Ravenna, Italy. It was listed with seven other structures in Ravenna in the World Heritage List in 1996. The UNESCO experts describe it as "the earliest and best preserved of all mosaic monuments, and at the same time one of the most artistically perfect".
The building was formerly the oratory of the Church of the Holy Cross and now contains three sarcophagi. The largest sarcophagus was thought to contain the remains of Galla Placidia (died 450), daughter of the Roman Emperor Theodosius I. Her embalmed body was reportedly deposited there in a sitting position, clothed with the imperial mantle. In 1577, however, the contents of the sarcophagus were accidentally burned. The sarcophagus to the right is attributed to Galla's son, Emperor Valentinian III, or to her brother, Emperor Honorius. The one on the left is attributed to her husband, Emperor Constantius III.

The building is not currently used as a mausoleum. It is unknown what the building was intended for when it was built. The most common story is that the structure was built by Galla Placidia, who was a well-known patron of the arts, to be used as a mausoleum for her and her family. There seems to be no evidence to prove or disprove Galla’s connection to the building. The mausoleum was once connected to the narthex of Santa Croce, the church for the imperial palace, built in 417 but now in ruins. Santa Croce was one of the first buildings commissioned by Galla. The floor has been raised by five feet since the fifth century in order to remain above the rising water along the upper Adriatic coast.

082 Mausoleo di Galla Placidia by Gabriele Quaglia, su Flickr

Mausoleo di Galla Placidia by Aldo Cavini Benedetti, su Flickr

Mosaici del Mausoleo di Galla Placidia by dsaba67, su Flickr

Cupola e lunette by drugodragodiego, su Flickr

Mausoleo di Galla Placidia by Simona, su Flickr

DSC_7174 Ravenna - Italy (Mausoleo di Galla Placidia) by Tiberio Frascari, su Flickr

Ravenna - Mausoleum of Galla Placidia - north entrance lunette mosaic Christ as Good Shepherd 5thC by edk7, su Flickr


Galla Placidia (Interno 2) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], di Stefano Suozzo (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons
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Old March 2nd, 2017, 11:36 AM   #3507
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Great Art in Ravenna, Emilia Romagna UNESCO World Heritage Site

Mausoleo di Teodorico

The Mausoleum of Theoderic (Italian: Mausoleo di Teodorico) is an ancient monument just outside Ravenna, Italy. It was built in 520 AD by Theoderic the Great as his future tomb.
The current structure of the mausoleum is divided into two decagonal orders, one above the other; both are made of Istria stone. Its roof is a single 300–ton Istrian stone, 10 meters in diameter. A niche leads down to a room that was probably a chapel for funeral liturgies; a stair leads to the upper floor. Located in the centre of the floor is a circular porphyry stone grave, in which Theoderic was buried. His remains were removed during Byzantine rule, when the mausoleum was turned into a Christian oratory. In the late 19th century, silting from a nearby rivulet that had partly submerged the mausoleum was drained and excavated.

It was inscribed with seven other "Early Christian Monuments and Mosaics of Ravenna" buildings as one of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 1996. According to the ICOMOS evaluation, "the significance of the mausoleum lies in its Gothic style and decoration, which owe nothing to Roman or Byzantine art, although it makes use of the Roman stone construction technique of opus quadratum, which had been abandoned four centuries before" and in the fact that "it is the only surviving example of a tomb of a king of this period."

An approximate replica of this tomb was constructed in the USA in 1925 when the Taplin Gorge Dam was constructed north of Fergus Falls, Minnesota. The designer (Vernon Wright who was also the president of the dam's owner - the Otter Tail Power Company) based the design of the powerhouse on this mausoleum.


Mausoleo di Teodorico 23 [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], di Flying Russian (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons



Mausoleo di Teodorico, Ravenna. [CC0], di Dritan Mardodaj (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons

Upper floor interior


Ravenna Mausoleum of Theoderic inside top wideangle [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], di Username.Ruge (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons


Ravenna Mausoleum of Theoderic inside top cracked roof stone [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], di Username.Ruge (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons

Lower floor interior


Ravenna Mausoleum of Theoderic inside lower level [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], di Username.Ruge (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons
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Old March 2nd, 2017, 12:40 PM   #3508
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Italian Artistic Traditions

Opificio delle Pietre Dure di Firenze, Toscana

The Opificio delle pietre dure, literally meaning Workshop of semi-precious stones, is a public institute of the Italian Ministry for Cultural Heritage based in Florence. It is a global leader in the field of art restoration and provides teaching as one of two Italian state conservation schools (the other being the Istituto Superiore per la Conservazione ed il Restauro). The institute maintains also a specialist library and archive of conservation and a museum displaying historic examples of pietre dure inlaid semi-precious stones artefacts. A scientific laboratory conducts research and diagnostics and provides a preventive conservation service.

Being one of the famous artistic workshops of the Italian Renaissance, the Opificio was established in 1588 at the behest of Ferdinando I de' Medici to provide the elaborate, inlaid precious and semi-precious stoneworks. One of the masterpieces of the crafts is the overall decoration of the Cappella dei Principi (Chapel of Princes) in the Basilica di San Lorenzo di Firenze. The technique, which originated from Byzantine inlay work, was perfected by the Opificio masters and the artworks they produced became known as "opera di commessi medicei" (commesso is the old name of the technique, similar to ancient mosaics) and later as "commesso in pietre dure" (semi-precious stones mosaic).

The artisans performed the exceptionally skilled and delicate task of inlaying thin veneers of semi-precious stones especially selected for their colour, opacity, brilliance and grain to create elaborate decorative and pictorial effects. Items of extraordinary refinement were created in this way, from furnishings to all manner of artworks. Today, artisans trained at the Opificio assist many of the world's museums in their restoration programmes.

The Opificio workshops were originally located in the Casino Mediceo, then in the Uffizi and were finally moved to their present location in Via Alfani in 1796. After the end of the 19th Century the institute's activities moved away from the production of works of art and towards its restoration. At first specialising in hardstone carving, in which the workshops were a world authority, and then later expanding into other related fields (stone and marble sculptures, bronzes, ceramics).


Opificio dlele pietre dure, cortile 01 [CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], di Sailko (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons


Fortezza lab [CC BY 2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5)], by Cecilia Frosinini at it.wikipedia (Transferred from it.wikipedia), from Wikimedia Commons


Museo dell'opificio delle pietre dure, sale ottocentesche 01 [CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], di Sailko (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons


Opificio delle pietre dure, antichi macchinari e campionario 04 [CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], di Sailko (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons

art from the coolest museum ever, the museo dell'opificio delle pietre dure. by megan gier, su Flickr


Stone table with decorative stone inlays
F10 Tabletop detail from 1840's by John Blower, su Flickr

Stone table with decorative stone inlays by Rebecca Dominguez, su Flickr

Stone table with decorative stone inlays by Rebecca Dominguez, su Flickr


Stone table with decorative stone inlays
Stone table with decorative stone inlays by Rebecca Dominguez, su Flickr

Inlaid stonework
Inlaid stonework by smallfrogge, su Flickr

Tabletop with refined inlaid pattern of semi-precious stones
Giuseppe Speluzzi (1827-1890) by yakovlev.alexey, su Flickr

Tabletop in semi-precious stones
F16 Tabletop 1855 by John Blower, su Flickr

Painting reproduced entirely of various colored stone
IMG_0955 by Kiaiwee, su Flickr

A detail of a Tabletop
Inlaid stonework by smallfrogge, su Flickr

A detail of a Tabletop
F13 Tabletop detail by John Blower, su Flickr
Tabletop in Semi-Precious Stone
F09 Tabletop in Semi-Precious Stone by John Blower, su Flickr

Opificio delle pietre dure by Kent Wang, su Flickr


La oración en el huerto (Galleria dei Lavori) [Public domain], di Galleria dei


Sala di ercole, manifattura granducale, stipo con fiori e frutta, dis. leonard van der vinne, 1660-80 ca. [CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], di Sailko (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons
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Old March 2nd, 2017, 12:57 PM   #3509
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Piazza Farnese, Roma - Lazio

Farnese stadium by Emanuele Serraino, su Flickr

roma, piazza farnese by Giuseppe De Cristofaro, su Flickr

piazza farnese by Giuseppe Moscato, su Flickr

piazza farnese by Damián Cuenca Abela, su Flickr

1754 2012 Palazzo Farnese by Alvaro de Alvariis, su Flickr

Palazzo Farnese by Jia Zhang, su Flickr

1761 2009 Piazza e Palazzo Farnese by Alvaro de Alvariis, su Flickr
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Old March 2nd, 2017, 05:23 PM   #3510
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Castello di Castelceriolo, Piemonte


Castelceriolo castello3 [Public domain], by Marco.sardi at Italian Wikipedia (Transferred from*it.wikipedia*to Commons.), from Wikimedia Commons


Castelceriolo castello2 [Public domain], by Marco Sardi (Own work), from Wikimedia Commons



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Old March 2nd, 2017, 08:17 PM   #3511
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Capriccioli, Sardegna

Capriccioli by Roberto Marchegiani, su Flickr

Capriccioli - Costa Smeralda by Antonio Signoriello, su Flickr

Capriccioli - Costa Smeralda by Antonio Signoriello, su Flickr

42-29115883 by Dmytro Kovalenko, su Flickr
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Old March 4th, 2017, 12:28 PM   #3512
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Castello di Montestrutto, Piemonte

Castello di Montestrutto 002 by Rosario Lepore, su Flickr

Castello con chiesa by Sergio Minoggio, su Flickr

Castello di Montestrutto e chiesa di San Giacomo / Settimo Vittone (TO) by agfa the frog, su Flickr

V.F 233 castello di Montestrutto by Guido, su Flickr
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Old March 4th, 2017, 12:39 PM   #3513
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Pavone Canavese, Piemonte

Castello di Pavone Canavese (TO) by agfa the frog, su Flickr

Castello di Pavone Canavese by Alessandro Buffa, su Flickr


Castello di Pavone (TO) by Andrea Germanà, su Flickr

Castello di Pavone, Pavone Cavanese - 08 by Tom Joaquin, su Flickr

Castello di Pavone by Massimo Ciocca, su Flickr
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Old March 4th, 2017, 12:48 PM   #3514
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Isola di Favignana - Sicilia

Favignana Sicilia - Cala azzurra by Lorenzo, su Flickr

Cala Azzurra / Sicily by Richard Brundage, su Flickr

Cala Azzurra. Favignana. by Giacinto Papasso, su Flickr

Path to Cala Rossa / Favignana by Richard Brundage, su Flickr

Cala Rossa by genchi71, su Flickr
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Old March 4th, 2017, 01:05 PM   #3515
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Penisola del Sinis, Sardegna

San Giovanni di Sinis by Stefano Cherchi, su Flickr

Capo San Marco by Matteo Paolo Tauriello, su Flickr

SARDEGNA-Penisola del SINIS by RENZO PIANESI, su Flickr

Strada romana by Cristiano Cani, su Flickr

Tempio delle due colonne by Cristiano Cani, su Flickr

Senza titolo by Simo, su Flickr
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Old March 4th, 2017, 01:44 PM   #3516
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Ara Pacis Augustae, Roma - Lazio

The Ara Pacis Augustae (Latin, "Altar of Augustan Peace"; commonly shortened to Ara Pacis) is an altar in Rome dedicated to Pax, the Roman goddess of Peace. The monument was commissioned by the Roman Senate on July 4, 13 BC to honor the return of Augustus to Rome after three years in Hispania and Gaul, and consecrated on January 30, 9 BC. Originally located on the northern outskirts of Rome, a Roman mile from the boundary of the pomerium on the west side of the Via Flaminia, it stood in the northeastern corner of the Campus Martius, the former flood plain of the Tiber River and gradually became buried under 4 metres (13 ft) of silt deposits. It was reassembled in its current location in 1938.

The altar reflects the Augustan vision of Roman civil religion. The lower register of its frieze depicts vegetal work meant to communicate the abundance and prosperity of the Roman Peace (Latin: Pax Augusta), while the monument as a whole serves a civic ritual function whilst simultaneous operating as propaganda for Augustus and his regime, easing notions of autocracy and dynastic succession that might otherwise be unpalatable to traditional Roman culture.

Within the enclosing precinct walls, the altar itself was carved with images illustrating the lex aria, the law governing the ritual performed at the altar. The sacrificial procession depicts animals being led to sacrifice by figures carved in a Republican style similar to the so-called "Altar of Domitius Ahenobarbus," in sharp contrast with the style on the exterior of the precinct walls. What remains of the altar is otherwise fragmentary, but it appears to have been largely functional with less emphasis on art and decoration.

The interior of the precinct walls are carved with bucrania, ox skulls, from which carved garlands hang. The garlands bear fruits from various types of plants, all displayed on a single garland as allegorical representations of plenty and abundance. The bucrania in turn evoke the idea of sacrificial piety, appropriate motifs for the interior of the altar precinct. The lower register of the interior walls imitate the appearance of traditionally wooden altar precincts, which were meant to bring to mind other such altars in Rome and the tradition of constructing altars at the boundary of the city's pomerium.

The exterior walls of the Ara Pacis are divided between allegorical and pseudo-historical relief panels on the upper register while the lower register is compared of scenes of nature: harmonic, intertwined vines that contain wildlife and connote nature under control. The upper register of the northern and southern walls depict scenes of the emperor, his family, and members of the regime in the act of processing to or performing a sacrifice. Various togate figures are shown with their heads covered (capite velato), signifying their role as both priests and sacrificiants. Other figures wear laurel crowns, traditional Roman symbols of victory. Members of individual priestly colleges are depicted in traditional garb appropriate to their office, while lictors can be identified by their iconographic fasces. Women and children are also included among the procession; the depiction of children in Roman sculpture would have been novel at the time of the Altar's construction, evoking themes of moral and familial piety, as well as easing concerns over dynastic intentions while simultaneously introducing potential heirs to the public eye.


Ara Pacis Augustae by Rob Brink, su Flickr

Ara Pacis by Luca Cerabona, su Flickr

Ara Pacis, Rome by arjunalistened, su Flickr

Ara Pacis Augustae by Patrick Bayens, su Flickr


Ara Pacis Roma [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)], by Jose Antonio (Own work), from Wikimedia Commons


The Ara Pacis Augustae or Altar of the Augustan Peace, built to celebrate the return of Augustus to Rome in 13 BC following campaigns in Spain and Gaul, Museo dell'Ara Pacis, Rome (20975281044) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], di Carole Raddato from FRANKFURT, Germany, da Wikimedia Commons

Ara Pacis, cermonial front with view of altar by Steven Zucker, su Flickr


Altar of Peace, Rome [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], di {{{1}}} (Flickr: Altar of Peace, Rome), da Wikimedia Commons


The Ara Pacis Augustae or Altar of the Augustan Peace, built to celebrate the return of Augustus to Rome in 13 BC following campaigns in Spain and Gaul, Museo dell'Ara Pacis, Rome (21410054220) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], di Carole Raddato from FRANKFURT, Germany, da Wikimedia Commons


Ara pacis fregio lato est 1 [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) o CC BY 2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5)], di Sailko (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons

Ara Pacis Augustae (Particolare) by Aureliano Verità, su Flickr
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Old March 7th, 2017, 03:51 PM   #3517
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Concattedrale di Santa Maria Assunta, Bobbio - Emilia Romagna

Bobbio by Giuseppe Bongiovanni, su Flickr

Piazza del Duomo Bobbio by raffaele pagani, su Flickr

Duomo di Bobbio by Francesco Galli, su Flickr

Duomo di Bobbio by Gianlu71, su Flickr

Duomo di Bobbio (Pc) by Gianlu71, su Flickr

Musica Celestiale by Roberto Rubiliani, su Flickr
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Old March 7th, 2017, 04:00 PM   #3518
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Castello Orsini, Nerola - Lazio

Castello Orsini Nerola by Nico Micarelli, su Flickr

Castello di Nerola by Pier Luigi De Stefanis, su Flickr

101. Castle Orsini, Nerola by May McCalley, su Flickr

nerola castello orsini_hdr_mode_1 by ROBERTO DI PINTO, su Flickr

DSC02781 1500 II by Wilhelm Frank - Stockholm, su Flickr
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Old March 7th, 2017, 04:15 PM   #3519
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Castel Mareccio, Bolzano - Trentino Alto Adige

Bolzano : Castel Mareccio by Matrioska Anca, su Flickr

Bolzano castel Mareccio 0950 by Giovanni Fabriani, su Flickr

Bolzano. Castel Mareccio. by Cesare Schiapelli, su Flickr

Castel Mareccio (Bolzano) by Di Vinti, su Flickr

Castel Mareccio by Giancarlo Lamberti, su Flickr
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Old March 7th, 2017, 04:29 PM   #3520
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Ostia Antica, Roma - Lazio

Ostia Antica - The Hamlet (3/7) by Johnfranky T., su Flickr

Il Borghetto di Ostia Antica-The village of Ostia Antica(7/7) by Johnfranky T., su Flickr


Ostia antica - s Aurea 1020490 [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) o CC BY 2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5)], di Lalupa (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons

1940 ca 2012 Piazzale delle Corporazioni, Ostia Antica by Alvaro de Alvariis, su Flickr
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Last edited by FAK; March 7th, 2017 at 04:36 PM.
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