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Old March 15th, 2017, 01:32 PM   #3561
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You're right.This is surely due to the fact that also the island of Corsica was part of Italy till few centuries ago and has an architectural and cultural heritage resulting from a long period of domination by the maritime republic of Pisa
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Old March 15th, 2017, 02:02 PM   #3562
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Montecosaro, Marche

Vista su Montecosaro by Alessandro Fermani, su Flickr

Montecosaro Alto | Marche | Italy by Pietro Torre, su Flickr

Montecosaro | Marche | Italy by Pietro Torre, su Flickr

Montecosaro Alto | Marche | Italy by Pietro Torre, su Flickr
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Old March 16th, 2017, 05:19 PM   #3563
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Chiesa di Santo Stefano Rotondo al Celio, Roma - Lazio

The Basilica of St. Stephen in the Round on the Celian Hill is an ancient basilica and titular church in Rome, Italy. Commonly named Santo Stefano Rotondo, the church is Hungary's "national church" in Rome, dedicated to both Saint Stephen, the Christian first martyr, and Stephen I, the sanctified first king of Hungary who imposed Christianity on his subjects. The minor basilica is also the rectory church of the Pontifical Collegium Germanicum et Hungaricum.
The walls of the church are decorated with numerous frescoes, including those of Niccolò Circignani (Niccolò Pomarancio) and Antonio Tempesta portraying 34 scenes of martyrdom, commissioned by Gregory XIII in the 16th century. Each painting has a titulus or inscription explaining the scene and giving the name of the emperor who ordered the execution, as well as a quotation from the Bible.
The altar was made by the Florentine artist Bernardo Rossellino in the 15th century. The painting in the apse shows Christ between two martyrs. An ancient chair of Pope Gregory the Great from around 580 AD is preserved here.

The Chapel of Ss. Primo e Feliciano has very interesting and rare mosaics from the 7th century. One of them shows the martyrs Primus and Felician flanking a crux gemmata (jewelled cross). The chapel was built by Pope Theodore I who brought here the relics of the martyrs and buried them (together with the remains of his father).


RomaSStefanoRotIngresso [Public domain], di MM (Foto propria), da Wikimedia Commons

Roma (Řím, Itálie), Santo Stefano al Rotondo by MONUDET, su Flickr

Celio, Santo Stefano rotondo by Spiros I., su Flickr

Roma (Řím, Itálie), Santo Stefano al Rotondo by MONUDET, su Flickr

Senza titolo by Stefano Pizzetti, su Flickr

Rome - Santo Stefano Rotondo - round church on the Caelian. by edk7, su Flickr

MURO CIRCOLARE CON DIPINTI DELLA BASILICA DI SANTO STEFANO ROTONDO by ANDREA COVELLI, su Flickr

Roma (Řím, Itálie), Santo Stefano al Rotondo by MONUDET, su Flickr

Rome - Santo Stefano Rotondo - round church on the Caelian. by edk7, su Flickr
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Old March 16th, 2017, 05:32 PM   #3564
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Chiesa di Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari, Venezia - Veneto

The Basilica di Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari, usually just called the Frari, is a church in Venice, northern Italy. One of the greatest churches in the city, it has the status of a minor basilica. It stands on the Campo dei Frari at the heart of the San Polo district. The church is dedicated to the Assumption (Italian: Assunzione della Beata Vergine).

The Franciscans were granted land to build a church in 1250, but the building was not completed until 1338. Work almost immediately began on its much larger replacement, the current church, which took over a century to build. The campanile, the second tallest in the city after that of San Marco, was completed in 1396.

The imposing edifice is built of brick, and is one of the city's three notable churches built in the Italian Gothic style. As with many Venetian churches, the exterior is rather plain. The interior contains the only rood screen still in place in Venice.

The Frari is a parish church of the Vicariate of San Polo-Santa Croce-Dorsoduro. The other churches of the parish are San Barnaba, San Ludovico Vescovo, Santa Maria del Soccorso and Santa Margherita.

Titian, the most important member of the 16th-century Venetian school of painting, is interred in the Frari.

Venice, Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari 434 by Peter, su Flickr


Basilica di Santa Maria dei Frari - Venezia [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], by Didier Descouens (Own work), from Wikimedia Commons

Basilica di Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari by ChihPing, su Flickr

Venice is must have seen by Werner Böhm, su Flickr

Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari 1 by Xavier, su Flickr

Venedig, Basilica di Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari, Chorgestühl (choir stalls) by HEN-Magonza, su Flickr

Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari 2 by Xavier, su Flickr


Frari (Venice) - Main altar [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], by Didier Descouens (Own work), from Wikimedia Commons


Frari (Venice) Cappella Corner - Pala di San Marco by Bartolomeo Vivarini [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], by Didier Descouens (Own work), from Wikimedia Commons


Frari (Venice) interior facade [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], by Didier Descouens (Own work), from Wikimedia Commons


Frari (Venice) interior facade - Monument to Alvise Pasqualigo [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], by Didier Descouens (Own work), from Wikimedia Commons


Frari (Venice) nave right - St.Antony Altar [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], by Didier Descouens (Own work), from Wikimedia Commons


Frari (Venice) nave right - Monument of Titian [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], by Didier Descouens (Own work), from Wikimedia Commons

Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari by GerardMJ, su Flickr
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Old March 16th, 2017, 05:51 PM   #3565
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Villa Valmarana Morosini, Altavilla Vicentina - Veneto

Villa Valmarana Morosini is a Venetian villa, located in the municipality of Altavilla Vicentina, in the province of Vicenza. Its creation was the work of architect Francesco Muttoni in 1724 by order of Count Benedetto Valmarana.

The main facade, visible from the highway, is incomplete, while the Marconi street is visible from the back side. The complex is used as a center of higher education since 1980.

La villa vista dal parco by Fondazione CUOA, su Flickr

Villa Valmarana Morosini, Altavilla Vicentina 09.03.2015 by Alexandra, su Flickr

La villa vista dalla strada by Fondazione CUOA, su Flickr

La villa vista dal parco by Fondazione CUOA, su Flickr

La villa con il portico by Fondazione CUOA, su Flickr
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Old March 16th, 2017, 06:21 PM   #3566
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Arche Scaligere, Verona - Veneto

The Scaliger Tombs (Italian: Arche scaligere) is a group of five Gothic funerary monuments in Verona, Italy, celebrating the Scala family, who ruled in Verona from the 13th to the late 14th century.

The tombs are located in a court outside the church of Santa Maria Antica, separated from the street by a wall with iron grilles. Built in Gothic style, they are a series of tombs, mostly freestanding open tabernacle-like structures rising high above the ground, with a sarcophagus surmounted by an elaborate baldachin, topped by a statue of the deceased, mounted and wearing armour. According to the French historian Georges Duby, they are one of the most outstanding examples of Gothic art.

The tombs are placed within an enclosure of wrought iron grilles decorated with a stair motif, referring to the name of the della Scala family, meaning "of the stairs" in Italian. The stone pillars of the enclosure have statues of saints.


Arche scaligere (Verona) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], by Didier Descouens (Own work), from Wikimedia Commons


Arche scaligere (Verona) Mastino II [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], by Didier Descouens (Own work), from Wikimedia Commons

Verona by Alessandro Ceci, su Flickr

Scaliger Tombs by Darko Markovic, su Flickr

20140711 Arche scaligere accessibilita Verona 653 by dismappa verona, su Flickr


Arca di Guglielmo da Castelbarco (Verona) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], by Didier Descouens (Own work), from Wikimedia Commons

Verona Arche Scaligere by Terence Faircloth, su Flickr


Arche scaligere (Verona) L'arca di Cangrande [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], by Didier Descouens (Own work), from Wikimedia Commons

Verona by Alessandro Ceci, su Flickr
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Old March 16th, 2017, 06:30 PM   #3567
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Piramide di Caio Cestio, Roma - Lazio

The Pyramid of Cestius is an ancient pyramid in Rome, Italy, near the Porta San Paolo and the Protestant Cemetery. It stands at a fork between two ancient roads, the Via Ostiensis and another road that ran west to the Tiber along the approximate line of the modern Via della Marmorata. Due to its incorporation into the city's fortifications, it is today one of the best-preserved ancient buildings in Rome.
The pyramid was built about 18–12 BC as a tomb for Gaius Cestius, a magistrate and member of one of the four great religious corporations in Rome, the Septemviri Epulonum. It is of brick-faced concrete covered with slabs of white marble standing on a travertine foundation. The pyramid measures 100 Roman feet (29.6 m) square at the base and stands 125 Roman feet (37 m) high.

In the interior is the burial chamber, a simple barrel-vaulted rectangular cavity measuring 5.95 metres long, 4.10 m wide and 4.80 m high. When opened in 1660, the chamber was found to be decorated with frescoes, which were recorded by Pietro Santi Bartoli. Only scant traces of these frescoes survive, and no trace of any other contents. The tomb had been sealed when it was built, with no exterior entrance, but had been plundered at some time thereafter, probably during antiquity. Until the end of restoration works in 2015, it was not possible for visitors to access the interior, except by special permission typically only granted to scholars. Since the beginning of May 2015, the pyramid is open to the public every second and fourth Saturday each month. Visitors must arrange their visit in advance.



Roma-Piramide Cestia [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) o CC BY-SA 2.5-2.0-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5-2.0-1.0)], di Jimmy P. Renzi (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons

Pirâmide de Caio Céstio e Porta di S. Paolo, Roma by carla.nabais, su Flickr


Pyramid of cestius [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], di Francesco Gasparetti from Senigallia, Italy (Piramide Cestia), da Wikimedia Commons


Piramide Caio Cestio area archeologica [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) o GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], di Alessio Damato (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons


Pyramid of Caius Cestius exterior 3 [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], di Torquatus (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons
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Old March 16th, 2017, 06:48 PM   #3568
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Mausoleo di Caecilia Metella, Via Appia Antica, Roma - Lazio

The Tomb of Caecilia Metella is a mausoleum located just outside Rome at the three mile marker of the Via Appia. It was built during the 1st century B.C to honor Caecilia Metella who was the daughter of Quintus Caecilius Metellus Creticus, a Consul in 69 B.C, and wife of Marcus Licinius Crassus (quaestor), son of the famous Marcus Crassus who served under Julius Caesar.

The Tomb of Caecilia is one of the most well known and well preserved monuments along the Via Appia and a popular tourist site.

Located on top of a hill along the Via Appia, the Tomb of Caecilia Metella consists of a cylindrical drum, or rotunda, atop a square podium with the Caetani Castle (Castrum) attached at the rear. The square podium stands at 8.3 meters tall with the cylindrical drum standing at 12 m. The monument in totality stands at a height of 21.7 meters tall. The diameter of the circular drum is 29.5 m, equivalent to 100 Roman feet.

On the outside of the monument, an inscription can be seen reading "CAECILIAE |Q·CRETICI·F | METELLAE·CRASSI" indicating to whom this tomb was dedicated. Further up the monument, decorations can be seen depicting festoons and bucrania, heads of bulls, which were the inspiration for the area being named Capo Di Bove, meaning head of the bovine. At the top of the monument, medieval battlements can be seen from the time when the tomb was used as a fortress.

At the rear, the Caetani Castle is attached to the tomb. The castle originally was three levels: ground level, first level, and second level. It is unknown what the second level was used for but the first floor was used for the elite gentlemen as evidenced by fireplaces and refined goods. The castle is now used to display various decorations from the monument.

Via Appia Antica by Atilla2008, su Flickr

1767 2010 Antichità romane, Urne, cippi e vasi cenerari by Alvaro de Alvariis, su Flickr

2588 R Roma Rim year ~ 1960 Via Appia Tomba di Cecilia Metella dijapozitiv by Vladimir Tkalčić, su Flickr


Via Appia Antica photo-4 [CC0], di AlfvanBeem (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons

Italy 151 by Chuck and Kelly Konopa, su Flickr

Roma by Patrizia Manco, su Flickr


Mausoleum of Caecilia Metella, Via Appia (9091330880) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], di Carole Raddato from FRANKFURT, Germany, da Wikimedia Commons
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Old March 16th, 2017, 07:09 PM   #3569
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Via Appia Antica, Roma - Lazio

The Appian Way was one of the earliest and strategically most important Roman roads of the ancient republic. It connected Rome to Brindisi, in southeast Italy. Its importance is indicated by its common name, recorded by Statius:

Appia longarum... regina viarum

"the Appian Way the queen of the long roads"
The road is named after Appius Claudius Caecus, the Roman censor who began and completed the first section as a military road to the south in 312 BC during the Samnite Wars.

The Appian Way was used as a main route for military supplies since its construction for that purpose in 312 B.C.[

The Appian Way was the first long road built specifically to transport troops outside the smaller region of greater Rome (this was essential to the Romans). The few roads outside the early city were Etruscan and went mainly to Etruria. By the late Republic, the Romans had expanded over most of Italy and were masters of road construction. Their roads began at Rome, where the master itinerarium, or list of destinations along the roads, was located, and extended to the borders of their domain — hence the expression, "All roads lead to Rome".

Shadows on the Appian Way by Atilla2008, su Flickr

Via Appia Antica by Alexander Toporov, su Flickr

Via Appiah Antica - the Appian Way, Ancient road - Rome 2016 by Erik Törner, su Flickr

Via Appia Antica by Andrew Buchsbaum, su Flickr

Rome, city wall near Via Appia by Gunter Hartnagel, su Flickr

Via Appia Antica by Alexander Toporov, su Flickr

Via Appia Antica by Spiros I., su Flickr

Rome, historical gate near Via Appia by Gunter Hartnagel, su Flickr

via Appia, Minturno by John Winder, su Flickr

Via Appia Antica, Rome, Italy Feb 2014 by QubeX, su Flickr
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Old March 16th, 2017, 08:02 PM   #3570
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Casino Nobile di Villa Torlonia, Roma - Lazio


Villa Torlonia 01304 [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)], by Lalupa (Self-published work by Lalupa), from Wikimedia Commons

Roma, Villa Torlonia, Casino Nobile by giulio gobbi, su Flickr

#Repost @a_r_t_i_t_u_d_e with @repostapp ・・・ La Sala da ballo del Casino Nobile in villa Torlonia. Mussolini fu tra gli abitanti del Casino! #arte#art#artistic#pittura#scultura#villatorlonia#roma#Italia#artwork#love#peace#relax#summer#visit#tagsforlikes#l by Musei in Comune Roma, su Flickr

Casino Nobile di Villa Torlonia by Musei in Comune Roma, su Flickr

Casino Nobile di Villa Torlonia by Musei in Comune Roma, su Flickr

Casino Nobile di Villa Torlonia by Musei in Comune Roma, su Flickr

Casino Nobile di Villa Torlonia by Musei in Comune Roma, su Flickr

Casino Nobile di Villa Torlonia by Musei in Comune Roma, su Flickr

Casino Nobile di Villa Torlonia by Musei in Comune Roma, su Flickr

Roma - Villa Torlonia - Casino Nobile by Massimo M., su Flickr

Rom, Villa Torlonia, Casino Nobile, Bacchuszimmer / Bacchus room / sala di Bacco by HEN-Magonza, su Flickr

2016-07-03--164643 Villa Torlonia by MicdeF, su Flickr

Villa Torlonia by oc, su Flickr
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Old March 19th, 2017, 06:37 PM   #3571
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Portofino, Liguria

Santa Margherita Ligure e PortoFino by DavidGutta, su Flickr

Santa Margherita Ligure e PortoFino by DavidGutta, su Flickr

Santa Margherita Ligure e PortoFino by DavidGutta, su Flickr

Santa Margherita Ligure e PortoFino by DavidGutta, su Flickr

Santa Margherita Ligure e PortoFino by DavidGutta, su Flickr

Santa Margherita Ligure e PortoFino by DavidGutta, su Flickr

Santa Margherita Ligure e PortoFino by DavidGutta, su Flickr

Santa Margherita Ligure e PortoFino by DavidGutta, su Flickr

Santa Margherita Ligure e PortoFino by DavidGutta, su Flickr
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Old March 19th, 2017, 06:43 PM   #3572
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Santa Margherita Ligure, Liguria

Santa Margherita Ligure e PortoFino by DavidGutta, su Flickr

Santa Margherita Ligure e PortoFino by DavidGutta, su Flickr

Santa Margherita Ligure e PortoFino by DavidGutta, su Flickr

Santa Margherita Ligure e PortoFino by DavidGutta, su Flickr

Santa Margherita Ligure e PortoFino by DavidGutta, su Flickr

Santa Margherita Ligure e PortoFino by DavidGutta, su Flickr

Santa Margherita Ligure e PortoFino by DavidGutta, su Flickr
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Old March 20th, 2017, 06:31 PM   #3573
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Abbazia di Rodengo, Brescia - Lombardia


Abbazia Rodengo Chiesa San Nicola [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) o GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], di Laurom (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons

The pit and the cloister. by Fabio Cecchin, su Flickr


Abbazia Rodengo Chiostro della Cisterna 01 [Public domain], di Laurom (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons

Rodengo Saiano - Abbazia Olivetana di San Nicola by Bandolerostanco, su Flickr

Fresco by Chiara S., su Flickr

Stairs by Chiara S., su Flickr

Inside by Chiara S., su Flickr

Le cappelle laterali by drugodragodiego (2,3 Millions of Thanks), su Flickr


Refettorio -veduta d'insieme- [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) o GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], di Ugo franchini (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons
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Old March 20th, 2017, 09:12 PM   #3574
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Chiesa Di San Giuseppe dei Teatini, Palermo - Sicilia

San Giuseppe dei Teatini is a church in the Sicilian city of Palermo. It is located near the Quattro Canti, and is considered one of the most outstanding examples of the Sicilian Baroque in Palermo.

The church was built at the beginning of the 17th century by Giacomo Besio, a Genoese member of the Theatines order. It has a majestic though simple façade. In the centre niche is housed a state of San Gaetano, founder of the Theatines order. Another striking feature is the large dome with a blue and yellow majolica covering. The tambour decorated with double columns, and was designed by Giuseppe Mariani. The belfry tower was designed by Paolo Amato.

The interior has a Latin cross plan with a nave and two aisles, divided by marble columns of variable height. The inner decoration is an overwhelming parade of Baroque art, with stuccoes by Paolo Corso and Giuseppe Serpotta. Great frescoes can be seen in the nave, in the vault of the transept: these were painted by Filippo Tancredi, Guglielmo Borremans and Giuseppe Velasquez. The frescoes were severely damaged during World War II, but have been accurately restored. The most important piece of art is however a wood crucifix by Fra' Umile of Petralia.

The crypt houses remains of a former church, dedicated to Madonna of Providence.


Palermo-San-Giuseppe-dei-Teatini-bjs2007-01 [CC BY-SA 2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], by Bjs (Own work), from Wikimedia Commons


Facade - San Giuseppe dei Teatini - Palermo - Italy 2015 [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], by José Luiz

Chiesa dei Teatini Interno, Palermo. Teatini's church in Palermo: The nave. by Rosario Sanguedolce, su Flickr

Above us, only sky... by Stefano N., su Flickr

Palerme, Sicile, Italie, Chiesa San Giuseppe dei Teatini aux Quattro Canti by Marie-Hélène Cingal, su Flickr

DSC01965 Sicily: Palermo - Chiesa di San Giuseppe dei Teatini by TuAnh Nguyen, su Flickr

DSC01971 Sicily: Palermo - Chiesa di San Giuseppe dei Teatini by TuAnh Nguyen, su Flickr

in cerca d'un'altra reincarnazione? by giuseppe modica, su Flickr

DSC01986 Sicily: Palermo - Chiesa di San Giuseppe dei Teatini by TuAnh Nguyen, su Flickr
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Old March 21st, 2017, 12:08 PM   #3575
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Akrai, Palazzolo Acreide - Sicilia

Akrai was a Greek colony founded in Sicily by the Syracusans in 663 BC. It was located near the modern Palazzolo Acreide.
Akrai was among the first colonies of Syracuse founded by Corinthian colonists arriving in Sicilian territory. It was on the road to Gela, along with the Pantalica, Kasmene (military outpost on Monte Lauro), Akrillai and Camarina (the most distant of the colonies, founded 598 BC). Akrai and Kasmene were founded by the Syracusans: Akrai, seventy years after Syracuse, Kasmenae about twenty years later (c.640 BC). The original colonisation of Kamarina is attributed to the Syracusans, around a hundred and thirty years after the foundation of Syracuse; the founders were called Daskon and Menekolos.

Constructed on the peak of a hill, Akrai was difficult to attack and at the time of its construction an ideal point for watching the surrounding territory. Thanks to the importance of its strategic position, the city achieved great prosperity, peaking during the reign of Hieron II (275 - 215 BC). Loyal to Syracuse, it nevertheless had its own political life with administrative and military autonomy. Notably, its army intercepted the invasion force of Nicias in the Val di Noto or Anapo uin 421 BC, contributing to his defeat.

In 211 BC, after the fall of Syracuse, it became part of the Roman province, being known in Latin as Acre. The city continued to be under Roman rule into the Byzantine period.

The community was completely destroyed by the Arabs in 827 and the abandoned city was slowly covered over by soil and vegetation, remaining hidden from view and forgotten for almost eight hundred years. One of the first scholars to identify the site of the lost city was the Sicilian scholar Tommaso Fazello (1498 – 1570). Subsequently others showed interest in the site, especially the Palazzolan baron Gabriele Judica, who undertook the first archaeological excavations at the site in the early nineteenth century and described his findings in the book Le antichità di Acre (The Antiquities of Akrai), published in 1819.

Later excavations of the archaic city have revealed a theatre which is small but veruy well preserved. From later periods there are two latomiae (stone quarries) from the mid fourth century, known as Intagliata and Intagliatella (Carved cave and Little carved cave). On the flat area above Intagliata are the foundation stones of the Aphrodision, the temple of Aphrodite, erected in the sixth century BC.

At the western end of the site is the Bouleuterion, where the city council met. East of the hill are the Feral Temples, dedicated to the cult of the goddess


https://www.facebook.com/Archeologia...type=3&theater

Akrai by Renate van der Meer, su Flickr

20160204_Teatro greco Akrai (17) by Mauro, su Flickr


Bouleterion di Akrai 02 [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], di Codas2 (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons

AKRAI Palazzolo Acreide by Michele Termine, su Flickr

Palazzolo Acreide (SR) Akrai by Bobo-1975, su Flickr

Picnic table? by Christine McIntosh, su Flickr

Erics Sicily_0293 by Eric Webb, su Flickr

562 Sicily - 14 August 08 by RoCam, su Flickr

Ruins, Akrai, Sicily by Alan Mosley, su Flickr


Catacombs of Akrai 01 [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], di Codas2 (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons


Catacombs of Akrai 03 [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], di Codas2 (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons
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Last edited by FAK; March 21st, 2017 at 11:36 PM.
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Old March 21st, 2017, 12:35 PM   #3576
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Villa di Poppea, Oplontis - Campania

The Villa Poppaea is an ancient Roman seaside villa (villa maritima) situated between Naples and Sorrento, in southern Italy. It is also referred to as the Villa Oplontis, or as Oplontis Villa A by modern archaeologists.The villa itself is a large structure situated in the ancient Roman town of Oplontis (the modern Torre Annunziata), about ten metres below modern ground level. Evidence suggests that it was owned by the Emperor Nero and believed to have been used by his second and rather notorious wife, Poppaea Sabina, as her main residence when she was not in Rome.

According to John R. Clarke in The Houses of Roman Italy, 100 B.C.-A.D. 250: Ritual, Space, and Decoration, the Villa Poppaea is best understood as a model on which many of the more modest city houses of ancient Pompeii and Herculaneum were based . This grandiose maritime villa is characterized by “rituals of reception and leisure” through both its physical space and its decoration.

Like many of the other houses in the area, the villa shows signs of remodeling, probably to repair damage from the earthquake in 62 CE. The oldest part of the house centers round the atrium and dates from the middle of 1st century BCE . During the remodeling, the house was extended to the east, with the addition of various reception and service rooms, gardens and a large swimming pool.

Like many of the frescoes that were preserved due to the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, those decorating the walls of the Villa Poppaea are striking both in form and in color. Many of the frescoes are in the “Second Style” (also called the Architectural Style) of ancient Roman painting, dating to ca. 90-25 BCE as classified in 1899 by August Mau. Details include feigned architectural features such as trompe-l'œil windows, doors, and painted columns.

Frescoes in the caldarium depicting Hercules in the Garden of the Hesperides are painted in the "Third Style" (also called the Ornate Style) dating to ca. 25 BCE-40 CE according to Mau. Attention to realistic perspective is abandoned in favor of flatness and elongated architectural forms which “form a kind of shrine" around a central scene, which is often mythological.

Immediately to the west of the triclinium is a large oecus, which was the main living room of a Roman house. Like the caldarium frescoes, the room is also painted in the Second Style. The east wall includes some wonderful details such as a theatre mask and peacock.

Much attention has been paid to the allusions to stage painting (scenae frons) in the Villa Poppaea frescoes, particularly those in Room 23.

Plan of the Villa.

OplontisPlanol [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], by Amadalvarez (Own work), from Wikimedia Commons

Oplontis by Margherita Ciliberti, su Flickr

Oplonti-Villa di Poppea by Carlo A.G. Tripodi, su Flickr


Oplontis-Peristil-5711 [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], by Amadalvarez (Own work), from Wikimedia Commons


Oplontis Peristyl room32 [Public domain], di Nessun autore leggibile automaticamente. AlMare presunto (secondo quanto affermano i diritti d'autore)., da Wikimedia Commons


Oplontis Caldarium room8 [Public domain], by User AlMare (Own work), from Wikimedia Commons


Oplontis room23 [Public domain], di Nessun autore leggibile automaticamente. AlMare presunto (secondo quanto affermano i diritti d'autore)., da Wikimedia Commons


Oplontis-3 [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], di Tony Wirthlin (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons

Oplonti Villa di Poppea Ruins, by Johnfranky T., su Flickr

Pitture della villa di Poppea by Johnfranky T., su Flickr

oplontis5 by Chuca Cimas, su Flickr


oplontis21 by Chuca Cimas, su Flickr

Oplonti by Rachael Webster, su Flickr

Villa Poppaea by CeBepuH, su Flickr


Oplontis-10 [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], di Tony Wirthlin (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons

oplontis18 by Chuca Cimas, su Flickr
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Old March 21st, 2017, 12:44 PM   #3577
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Viterbo, Lazio

Viterbo - Mura Medievali by Paolo Ramponi, su Flickr


Palazzo dei Papi Viterbo [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], di Claudio Caravano (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons

Piazza San Lorenzo by Paolo Capoccia, su Flickr


Viterbo-Duomo2013b [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) o CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], di Ben Skála, Benfoto (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons


Viterbo-Duomo2013interier [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) o CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], di Ben Skála, Benfoto (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons

Piazza San Pellegrino by Paolo Capoccia, su Flickr

viterbo beauty by bruno pagnanelli , su Flickr

Viterbo. by Marco Farolfi, su Flickr


Sta Maria della Quercia Kreuzgang [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], di Peter1936F (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons


Sta Maria della Quercia Hauptschiff [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], di Peter1936F (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons


Viterbo2013church3b [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) o CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], di Ben Skála, Benfoto (Opera propria), da Wikimedia Commons

Viterbo by dewartist, su Flickr

VanS3n - 08212013- Chiesa di Santa Maria Nouva, Viterbo -0001 by Christian Evren Gimotea Lozañes, su Flickr

VanS3n - 08212013- Chiesa di Santa Maria Nouva, Viterbo -0005 by Christian Evren Gimotea Lozañes, su Flickr

VanS3n - 08212013- Chiesa di Santa Maria Nouva, Viterbo -0010 by Christian Evren Gimotea Lozañes, su Flickr
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Old March 21st, 2017, 02:37 PM   #3578
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Ferento, Lazio

Ferento is a former city (state) and bishopric (now titular see) near Viterbo (in Lazio, Central Italy), which absorbed it.
Ferento started as an Ancient city, Ferentium, which was important enough to become a bishopric around 400 AD.

In 700 AD, its diocese was suppressed and its territory annexed to the Diocese of Bomarzo.

In 1172, the neighbouring city state Viterbo started its expansion, destroying the old city of Ferento.

Sito archeologico di Ferento by Jacqueline Poggi, su Flickr

Sito archeologico di Ferento by Jacqueline Poggi, su Flickr

Sito archeologico di Ferento by Jacqueline Poggi, su Flickr

Sito archeologico di Ferento by Jacqueline Poggi, su Flickr

1280px-Ferentium_1070 by etruria inside, su Flickr


Ferento Italy by S F William [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], by S. F. William (Own work), from Wikimedia Commons

1280px-Ferentium_1069 by etruria inside, su Flickr
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Old March 21st, 2017, 02:59 PM   #3579
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Isola di Bergeggi, Liguria

Curvatura by Giacomo Carena, su Flickr

Isola di Bergeggi by Davide Canepa, su Flickr

Bergeggi mon amour by Tiziano L. U. Caviglia, su Flickr

Isola di Bergeggi by PerixPic, su Flickr

7] Bergeggi(SV): la torre - ❹ by mpvicenza, su Flickr

Bergeggi (Savona) by *lutherblissett*, su Flickr
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Old March 22nd, 2017, 08:27 PM   #3580
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Cinecittà Studios, Roma - Lazio

Cinecittà is a large film studio in Rome that is considered the hub of Italian cinema. The studios were constructed during the Fascist era as part of a scheme to revive the Italian film industry.The purpose was not only for propaganda, but also to boost the Italian feature film industry, which was in crisis at the time. Mussolini himself inaugurated the studios on April 21, 1937.
In the 1950s, the number of international productions being made there led to Rome's being dubbed Hollywood on the Tiber.

As the home of Italian cinema, Cinecittà has seen the production of many classic films such as La Dolce Vita and Fellini Satyricon.

Since the days of Ben-Hur, the studios have welcomed international productions including Helen of Troy (1956), Francis of Assisi (1961), Cleopatra (1963), The Agony and the Ecstasy (1965), Fellini's Casanova (1976), Zeffirelli's Romeo and Juliet (1968), La Traviata (1982) and many other grand film productions. Recent films include Anthony Minghella's The English Patient, Martin Scorsese's Gangs of New York and Wes Anderson's The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou.

Cinecittà also hosts TV productions, such as Grande Fratello, the Italian version of Big Brother, where the Big Brother house is built on Cinecittà's premises. It has also been home to the filming of The Passion of the Christ, starring James Caviezel and directed by Mel Gibson.

In addition, the BBC/HBO series Rome was filmed there from 2004 to 2007, the show being widely acclaimed for its sets and designs. BBC Wales reused some of these sets for an episode of the 2008 series of Doctor Who set in ancient Pompeii, and Alexandre Astier reused this set for the Book VI of his television series Kaamelott set in Ancient Rome.

Cinecittà by Agostino Zamboni, su Flickr


Décors pour la Rome de César (Cinecittà) (5856289928) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], di Jean-Pierre Dalbéra from Paris, France (Décors pour la Rome de César (Cinecittà)), da Wikimedia Commons

Templi e tabularium by giannidedom ( the Cropman), su Flickr


SetRoma [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], by Claudio Caravano (Own work), from Wikimedia Commons


Décors pour la Rome de César (Cinecittà) (5856287720) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], di Jean-Pierre Dalbéra from Paris, France (Décors pour la Rome de César (Cinecittà)), da Wikimedia Commons


Décors pour la Rome de César (Cinecittà) (5856288300) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], di Jean-Pierre Dalbéra from Paris, France (Décors pour la Rome de César (Cinecittà)), da Wikimedia Commons

Cinecittà by Arjen Rienks, su Flickr

Cinecittà by rebecca.vanhulle, su Flickr


Martin scorsese gangs of new york set in cinecitta italy [Public domain], di Nessun autore leggibile automaticamente. Supercazzola presunto (secondo quanto affermano i diritti d'autore)., da Wikimedia Commons

cinecitta:set by giuseppe.dip50, su Flickr

_DSC3572 by Giovanni, su Flickr
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Last edited by FAK; March 22nd, 2017 at 08:41 PM.
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